Point Pleasant, New Jersey

Point Pleasant is a borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States.[22] As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 18,392,[11][12][13] down from 19,306 in 2000 but still up from 18,177 in 1990.[23]

Point Pleasant, New Jersey
Borough of Point Pleasant
Map of Point Pleasant in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Point Pleasant in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Point Pleasant, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Point Pleasant, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°04′38″N 74°04′12″W / 40.077328°N 74.070068°W / 40.077328; -74.070068Coordinates: 40°04′38″N 74°04′12″W / 40.077328°N 74.070068°W / 40.077328; -74.070068[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyOcean
IncorporatedMay 19, 1920
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorRobert A. Sabosik (R, term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • AdministratorFrank Pannucci Jr.[5]
 • Municipal clerkAntoinette Jones[6]
Area
 • Total4.17 sq mi (10.79 km2)
 • Land3.49 sq mi (9.04 km2)
 • Water0.67 sq mi (1.74 km2)  16.26%
Elevation13 ft (4 m)
Population
 • Total18,392
 • Estimate 
(2019)[14]
18,772
 • Rank140th of 566 in state
11th of 33 in county[15]
 • Density5,377.26/sq mi (2,076.12/km2)
 • Density rank104th of 566 in state
1st of 33 in county[15]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)732[18]
FIPS code3402959880[1][19][20]
GNIS feature ID0885357[1][21]
Websitewww.ptboro.com

The Borough is a Jersey Shore community situated south of the Manasquan River and north and east of the Beaverdam Creek and its confluence with the Metedeconk River.

Point Pleasant was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 21, 1920, from portions of Brick Township, based on the results of a referendum held on May 19, 1920. The borough was reincorporated on March 12, 1928.[24] Point Pleasant is distinct from Point Pleasant Beach, which is a separate community.[25] The borough gets its name from Point Pleasant Beach, which gets its name from its location at the northern end of the Barnegat Peninsula, a long, narrow barrier peninsula that divides the Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean at the Manasquan Inlet.[26]

HistoryEdit

Around 1500, the area that included the future Point Pleasant was the ceremonial meeting place of the Lenape Native Americans, who called it the "Land of Tall Timber". In approximately 1665, the first European settlers arrived in the area, mainly fishermen, farmers and boat builders.[25]

On February 15, 1850, Governor Daniel Haines and the New Jersey Legislature separated Ocean County from Monmouth County, and created Brick Township, including the Point Pleasant area, which became independent of Brick Township in 1920, though the post office carried the designation "West Point Pleasant" until 1956. According to the town's official website, many longtime residents still use that name. The town's first mayor was Melville B. Parker, chosen after J.H. Harvey declined the position after being elected. The town was initially a logging town, although logging was never a significant part of the local economy.[25]

In 1925, the Manasquan River-Bay Head Canal was completed as part of the inland waterway. The canal, which divides Point Pleasant in half, provides a passage for boats, and is the northernmost leg of the Intracoastal Waterway which traverses the East Coast of the United States along the Atlantic Ocean between New Jersey and Florida. In 1964, Senator Clifford P. Case introduced legislation that changed the canal's name to the Point Pleasant Canal.[25][27] The two lift bridges over the canal, at Route 88 and Bridge Avenue, can be opened as many as 300 times per day during the summer to allow boats to pass underneath as marine traffic has the right of way.[28]

Though often regarded as a summer resort, the borough's website emphasizes that it is a "year round community of approximately 19,000 residents".[25]

GeographyEdit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 4.167 square miles (10.790 km2), including 3.489 square miles (9.035 km2) of land and 0.678 square miles (1.755 km2) of water (16.26%).[1][2]

The borough is bounded on the north by the Manasquan River, on the east by Point Pleasant Beach and Bay Head, on the south by Beaver Dam Creek and on the west by Brick Township; the borough also borders Mantoloking in Ocean County and Brielle in Monmouth County.[25][29][30][31]

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
19302,058
19402,0821.2%
19504,00992.6%
196010,182154.0%
197015,96856.8%
198017,74711.1%
199018,1772.4%
200019,3066.2%
201018,392−4.7%
Est. 201918,772[14]2.1%
Population sources:
1930–2000[32] 1930[33]
1930–1990[34] 2000[35][36] 2010[10][11][12][13]

Census 2010Edit

The 2010 United States Census counted 18,392 people, 7,273 households, and 4,982.005 families in the borough. The population density was 5,272.1 per square mile (2,035.6/km2). There were 8,331 housing units at an average density of 2,388.1 per square mile (922.1/km2). The racial makeup was 96.05% (17,666) White, 0.41% (75) Black or African American, 0.13% (24) Native American, 0.72% (133) Asian, 0.03% (6) Pacific Islander, 1.66% (305) from other races, and 0.99% (183) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.08% (935) of the population.[11]

Of the 7,273 households, 30.0% had children under the age of 18; 52.5% were married couples living together; 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present and 31.5% were non-families. Of all households, 25.8% were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.03.[11]

22.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 24.3% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.0 years. For every 100 females, the population had 94.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 92.3 males.[11]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,521 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,209) and the median family income was $94,399 (+/- $4,750). Males had a median income of $67,632 (+/- $4,111) versus $47,428 (+/- $5,097) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,596 (+/- $1,783). About 1.8% of families and 3.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.5% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.[37]

Census 2000Edit

As of the 2000 United States Census[19] there were 19,306 people, 7,560 households, and 5,231 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,461.6 people per square mile (2,111.6/km2). There were 8,350 housing units at an average density of 2,362.2 per square mile (913.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.83% White, 5.33% African-American, Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.41%, 0.14% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races.[35][36]

There were 7,560 households, out of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.8% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no spouse, and 30.8% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.06.[35][36]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 23.7% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.[35][36]

The median income for a household in the borough was $55,987, and the median income for a family was $64,798. Males had a median income of $50,828 versus $32,886 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,715. About 2.0% of families and 3.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[35][36]

GovernmentEdit

Local governmentEdit

Point Pleasant is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 565) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[38] The governing body consists of the Mayor and the six-member Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Point Pleasant is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[39][40]

The Mayor is the head of municipal government; sees that state laws and borough ordinances are faithfully executed; presides over the Council. votes only to break ties; can veto ordinances subject to override by ⅔ majority of Council; and appoints subordinate officers with Council approval. After thirty days or upon Council disapproval, Council fills posts. The Borough Council is the legislative body of municipality. The Council overrides a mayor's veto by ⅔ majority of all members, confirms mayor's appointments. The Council gains appointment power upon failure to confirm mayor's appointee or after office vacant for thirty days. The Council has all executive responsibility not placed in office of mayor.

As of 2020, the Mayor of Point Pleasant is Republican Robert A. Sabosik, whose term of office ends December 31, 2022. The members of the Borough Council are Borough President Pamela Snyder (R, 2020), Charlene Archer (R, 2022), William T. Borowsky (R, 2021), Antoinette "Toni" DePaola (R, 2021), Joseph Furmato Jr. (R, 2022) and John R. Wisniewski (R, 2020).[3][41][42][43][44][45][46]

In February 2015, the Borough Council selected Michael Thulen Jr., from a list of three candidates recommended by the Republican municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2016 that had been held by Robert A. Sabosik vacant until he was sworn in as mayor the previous month.[47] In the November 2015 general election, Thulen was elected to serve the one year remaining on the term of office.[48]

Federal, state and county representationEdit

Point Pleasant is split between the 3rd and 4th Congressional Districts[49] and is part of New Jersey's 30th state legislative district.[12][50][51] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Point Pleasant had been in the 10th state legislative district.[52] Prior to the 2010 Census, all of Point Pleasant had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[52] As part of the 2013 redistricting, 1,802 residents in a wedge-shaped section in the western part of the borough were placed in the 3rd District, while the remaining 16,590 were placed in the 4th District.[49][53]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Andy Kim (D, Bordentown).[54] For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Chris Smith (R, Hamilton Township).[55][56] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[57] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[58][59]

For the 2020–2021 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 10th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James W. Holzapfel (R, Toms River) and in the General Assembly by John Catalano (R, Brick Township) and Gregory P. McGuckin (R, Toms River).[60][61]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[62] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2019, Ocean County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and department directorship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Virginia E. Haines (R, 2019, Toms River; Parks and Recreation and Natural Lands),[63] Freeholder Deputy Director John P. Kelly (R, 2019, Eagleswood Township; Law and Public Safety),[64] Gerry P. Little (R, 2021, Surf City; Roads),[65] Gary Quinn (R, 2021, Lacey Township; Human Services and Transportation)[66] and Joseph H. Vicari (R, 2020, Toms River; Senior Services and County Operations).[67][68][69] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2019, Barnegat Light),[70][71] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2019; Toms River)[72] and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2023, Beachwood).[73][74]

PoliticsEdit

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 12,681 registered voters in Point Pleasant, of which 2,336 (18.4%) were registered as Democrats, 4,026 (31.7%) were registered as Republicans and 6,311 (49.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 8 voters registered to other parties.[75] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 68.9% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 88.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[75][76]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 56.7% of the vote (5,141 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 42.4% (3,843 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (89 votes), among the 9,161 ballots cast by the borough's 13,245 registered voters (88 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 69.2%.[77][78] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 56.5% of the vote (5,599 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 41.4% (4,103 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (138 votes), among the 9,904 ballots cast by the borough's 13,154 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.3%.[79] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 60.5% of the vote (5,857 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 38.2% (3,700 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (85 votes), among the 9,683 ballots cast by the borough's 12,795 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 75.7.[80]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 71.6% of the vote (4,352 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 26.6% (1,619 votes), and other candidates with 1.7% (105 votes), among the 6,179 ballots cast by the borough's 13,118 registered voters (103 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 47.1%.[81][82] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 64.4% of the vote (4,606 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 27.6% (1,977 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.9% (421 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (69 votes), among the 7,152 ballots cast by the borough's 12,905 registered voters, yielding a 55.4% turnout.[83]

EducationEdit

The Point Pleasant School District, consisting of four school facilities, serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprising four schools, had an enrollment of 2,780 students and 238.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.7:1.[84] Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[85]) are: Nellie F. Bennett Elementary School[86] (745 students; in grades PreK-5), Ocean Road School[87] (493; K-5), Memorial Middle School[88] for grades 6-8 (658) and Point Pleasant Borough High School[89] for grades 9-12 (850).[90][91]

Saint Peter School, founded in 1923, serves students in grades K-8 and operates under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton.[92][93] In 2016, the school was one of ten schools in New Jersey, and one of four private schools in the state, recognized as a National Blue Ribbon School by the United States Department of Education, a recognition celebrating excellence in academics.[94][95]

InfrastructureEdit

TransportationEdit

 
Route 13 eastbound in Point Pleasant

Roads and highwaysEdit

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 78.04 miles (125.59 km) of roadways, of which 64.28 miles (103.45 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.86 miles (12.65 km) by Ocean County and 3.30 miles (5.31 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[96]

State highways include Route 13, which extends a total of .56 miles (0.90 km), most of which is in the borough with a small portion in Bay Head.[97] Route 88 traverses the borough to its eastern terminus at Route 35, just across the border with Point Pleasant Beach.[98]

Public transportationEdit

NJ Transit provides bus service to Philadelphia on the 317 route.[99]

Ocean Ride local service is provided on the OC3A Brick – Point Pleasant and the OC4 Lakewood – Brick Link routes.[100][101][102]

Health careEdit

Point Pleasant Hospital was founded in 1918 and became part of Ocean Medical Center in 1982. The hospital closed its doors in 2001.[103]

In mediaEdit

Notable peopleEdit

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Point Pleasant include: ((B) denotes that the person was born there)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor and Borough Council, Borough of Point Pleasant. Accessed March 3, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ Borough Administrator, Borough of Point Pleasant. Accessed March 3, 2020.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Point Pleasant. Accessed March 3, 2020.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 53.
  8. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 26, 2020.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Point Pleasant, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  10. ^ a b 2010 Census Populations: Ocean County, Asbury Park Press. Accessed July 30, 2011.
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  12. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
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  14. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  15. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  16. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Point Pleasant, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  17. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  18. ^ Area Code Lookup – NPA NXX for Point Pleasant, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  19. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ Geographic codes for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 1, 2019.
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  26. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 21, 2015.
  27. ^ The Point Pleasant Canal; When the canal was opened in 1925 the upper Barnegat Bay was transformed from a stable fresh water area to a salt water bay with tides and currents. No environmental impact statement was needed., Point Pleasant History. Accessed March 3, 2020. "There are varying accounts of exactly when the canal became navigable in 1926, but a climatic moment came at 3:15 p.m. on December 15, 1925 when a scoop dredge lifted a shovel full of dirt and allowed the waters of the Manasquan River and Barnegat Bay to intermingle.... Citing the fact that the waterway is entirely within Point Pleasant Borough's boundaries, and wanting to be more closely identified with the canal, Point Pleasant officials in 1964 successfully petitioned Congress to change the name from the Bay Head — Manasquan Canal to the Point Pleasant Canal."
  28. ^ a b Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Point Pleasant, N.J.; A Borough With a Variety of Boating", The New York Times, November 9, 2003. Accessed November 1, 2013. "The most famous Point Pleasant resident was Eugene O'Neill, who married a local girl named Agnes Boulton and grumbled about being bored through the winter of 1918–19, as he lived rent free in a home owned by Agnes's parents... Seven years later, the couple divorced and Agnes moved back to Point Pleasant with their two children, Shane and Oona, who would marry Charlie Chaplin."
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  37. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Point Pleasant borough, Ocean County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 12, 2012.
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  66. ^ Freeholder Gary Quinn, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 4, 2019.
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  80. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 31, 2012.
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  84. ^ District information for Point Pleasant Borough School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  85. ^ School Data for the Point Pleasant School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  86. ^ Nellie F. Bennett Elementary School, Point Pleasant Borough Schools. Accessed January 25, 2020.
  87. ^ Ocean Road School, Point Pleasant Borough Schools. Accessed January 25, 2020.
  88. ^ Memorial Middle School, Point Pleasant Borough Schools. Accessed January 25, 2020.
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  90. ^ About Us, Point Pleasant School District. Accessed March 3, 2020. "Nestled in the heart of Point Pleasant, New Jersey, the Point Pleasant Borough School District is comprised of two elementary schools, one middle school and one high school that together provide Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 educational services to approximately 2,800 students."
  91. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Point Pleasant Borough Board of Education, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  92. ^ General Information, Saint Peter School. Accessed November 13, 2016. "Founded in 1923, Saint Peter School is the first and oldest Catholic school in Ocean County. Saint Peter School serves students in grades K through eight."
  93. ^ School Finder, Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton. Accessed March 3, 2020.
  94. ^ 2016 National Blue Ribbon Schools All Public and Non-Public, National Blue Ribbon Schools Program. Accessed November 13, 2016.
  95. ^ Clark, Adam. "These 10 N.J. schools earn Blue Ribbon honors", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, September 28, 2016. Accessed November 13, 2016. "The U.S. Department of Education on Wednesday announced that 10 New Jersey schools have been named National Blue Ribbon Schools, a recognition celebrating excellence in academics."
  96. ^ Ocean County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 1, 2013.
  97. ^ Route 13 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, February 2007. Accessed November 1, 2013.
  98. ^ Route 88 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, February 2009. Accessed November 1, 2013.
  99. ^ Ocean County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  100. ^ Ocean County Bus Service Archived 2015-08-14 at the Wayback Machine, Greater Mercer TMA. Accessed August 11, 2015.
  101. ^ Ocean Ride Rider's Guide Archived June 27, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed August 11, 2015.
  102. ^ Ocean County Transit Guide Archived September 23, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed August 11, 2015.
  103. ^ Out History, Ocean Medical Center. Accessed January 25, 2020. "In 1918, the hospital began in four rooms in the Point Pleasant Beach home of Dr. Frank Denniston, a physician whose teenage assistant, Arnold Lane, later became the hospital administrator for 33 years.... In 1982, Point Pleasant Hospital changed its name to Northern Ocean Hospital System and construction began on Brick Hospital.... Point Pleasant Hospital closed in 2001."
  104. ^ via Associated Press. "Point Pleasant disturbs namesake town: Fox drama brings devil's daughter to New Jersey", MSNBC, January 14, 2005. Accessed July 30, 2011. "The one-hour drama centers on pretty blond Christina Nickson, who turns up on the beach in Point Pleasant, N.J., one day and soon begins raising hell – wherever she goes, storm clouds gather, candles blow out, cars explode in flames. The reason soon becomes clear: She's the devil's daughter."
  105. ^ Staff. "Alec Baldwin and Jimmy Fallon: Point Pleasant Police Department", Dan's Papers', October 22, 2013. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  106. ^ Qaroone, Nawal. "For Antonella, Idol finale is bittersweet", The Star-Ledger, May 22, 2007. Accessed December 31, 2012. "Barba, of Point Pleasant, made it to the top 16 on the show, but gained notoriety amid racy photographs that surfaced on the Internet."
  107. ^ Staff. "Skid Row's Bolan Makes Music on the Track", Charlotte Motor Speedway, July 24, 2004, backed up by the Internet Archive as of April 3, 2013. Accessed October 23, 2018. "The Point Pleasant, N.J., native was a huge fan of seven-time NASCAR champion Dale Earnhardt and he carries a No. 3 with Earnhardt's signature on the dashboard of his Legends Car."
  108. ^ Staff. "Mrs. Agnes Kaufman, 75, Dies; Eugene O'Neill's Second Wife; Writer of Short Stories and Pulp Novels Was Mother of Oona and Shane", The New York Times, November 26, 1968. Accessed November 1, 2013. "They soon moved to her house in Point Pleasant, making it necessary for her to turn out her parents and her daughter, Barbara Burton, whose father had died shortly before Agnes moved to New York."
  109. ^ D'Agnese, Joseph. "Destinations; With this Franchise, The State Is on a Roll", The New York Times, April 2, 2000. Accessed July 12, 2012. "It certainly is for Mr. Cancro. At age 14, he followed his brother's lead and got a job at Mike's sandwich shop in their hometown, Point Pleasant."
  110. ^ Assembly Member Caroline Casagrande's Biography, Project Vote Smart. Accessed November 1, 2013.
  111. ^ Garofolo, Chris. "Former legislator Chard, 76, dies", Brattleboro Reformer, February 19, 2010. Accessed October 23, 2018. "Born in Point Pleasant, N.J., on July 14, 1933, to Burtis Rue and Thelma Risden Imlay, she graduated from Upsala College and earned a Master's in History at Rutgers University."
  112. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey, p. 230. E. J. Mullin, 2008. Accessed July 22, 2020. "Senator Ciesla was bom in Point Pleasant on July 24, 1953. He attended St. Peter's Grammar School and Point Pleasant High School."
  113. ^ Lavietes, Stuart. "Fred J. Cook, 92, the Author of 45 Books, Many Exposés", The New York Times, May 4, 2003. Accessed November 1, 2013. "Fred James Cook was born in Point Pleasant, N.J., in 1911. He graduated from Rutgers University in 1932."
  114. ^ Dick Cooke, Baseball-reference.com. Accessed November 1, 2013.
  115. ^ Chris Cummiskey - Biography, Vote Smart. Accessed August 5, 2019. "Birth Place: Point Pleasant, NJ"
  116. ^ Tawny Cypress – K-Ville, Fox Broadcasting Company. Accessed December 6, 2007. "A native of Point Pleasant, NJ, Cypress currently lives in New York City."
  117. ^ Wallye. "The story of the Assemblyman who got caught stealing an air conditioner", PolitickerNJ, May 7, 2009. Accessed September 21, 2015. "In July 1974, six months after taking office, D'Ambrosa was arrested on charges that he sold an air conditioner owned by Rahway for $600, pocketing the money, and he took a $200 bribe from a contractor. He was also accused of lying to a grand jury, and for using city materials and employees to do work on his shore home in Point Pleasant.... After prison, he moved to Point Pleasant full-time and started a nautical supply business. He owns Arnold's Yacht Basin."
  118. ^ New Jersey's 23rd Legislative District – Senator Michael Doherty, New Jersey State Republicans. Accessed November 1, 2013. "Mike Doherty was born in Point Pleasant, New Jersey on May 24, 1963."
  119. ^ Staff. "Celebrity Central / Top 25 Celebs: Kirsten Dunst", People. Accessed July 15, 2012. "Name: Kirsten Dunst; Date of Birth: April 30, 1982; Birth Place: Point Pleasant, N.J."
  120. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "On Jersey Shore, a Crucial State Race", The New York Times, October 25, 1989. Accessed November 13, 2016. "On the Democratic ticket with Mr. Doyle is former Assemblywoman Marlene Lynch Ford, 35, of Point Pleasant, while Mr. Singer's running mate is John A. Peterson Jr., 38, the Mayor of Seaside Park."
  121. ^ Leonardi, Ron."Athletics part of family life for Frazier", Erie Times-News, April 10, 2008. Accessed November 1, 2013. "As youngsters growing up in Point Pleasant, N.J., Charlie, Todd and Jeff were known for their rambunctious approach to anything they participated in against each other, from no blood-no foul backyard basketball games to Wiffle Ball, pool and ping pong."
  122. ^ Lucas, Ed. "Nice to report Jersey native Todd Frazier is making good with Cincinnati Reds", The Jersey Journal, June 1, 2012. Accessed July 15, 2012. "Earlier this week, Cincinnati Reds third baseman and Point Pleasant native Todd Frazier was having lunch in a Pittsburgh restaurant before heading to the ballpark for that night's game. In the middle of his meal, he noticed a man sitting at the next table choking on a piece of steak. Without hesitation, Frazier jumped up and successfully performed the Heimlich maneuver on his fellow diner, saving his life."
  123. ^ Americans Playing Abroad Archived 2013-10-30 at the Wayback Machine, Soccer Times, as of September 15, 2013. Accessed November 1, 2013. "Nick Gkionis – midfielder – FC Atlas Brussels – Point Pleasant, N.J."
  124. ^ Staff. Fitzgerald's Legislative Manual, State of New Jersey, 2001, p. 718. E. J. Mullin, 2001. "She was born in Point Pleasant on June 6, 1946. She graduated from Lakewood High School and attended Ocean County Community College."
  125. ^ Haberstroh, Christina. "A hometown baseball legend is remembered; Shop owners deliver on decades-old promise to mother of Frankie Hayes", Sentinel, June 30, 2011. Accessed October 23, 2018. "Hayes ultimately finished his 14-year career in the majors in 1947 after 1,364 games played and 1,164 hits for a career batting average of .259. He had 119 homeruns and 585 RBIs. He moved to Point Pleasant, where he opened a small sporting goods store and worked with a larger company to produce a Frank Hayes model catcher's mitt, with a nohinge deep pocket that allowed the catcher to secure the ball without using the other hand."
  126. ^ Wilson, Michael. "Lieutenant Who Won Pension Rights for Her Domestic Partner Dies at 49", The New York Times, February 20, 2006. Accessed December 18, 2007. "Lieutenant Hester died in the house in Point Pleasant that she owned with her partner, Stacie Andree."
  127. ^ Christopher, Sam. "Toms River Vet to be Honored by Monmouth University"[permanent dead link], copy of article from Ocean County Observer, May 6, 2007. Accessed April 7, 2008.
  128. ^ Leonard, Pat. "New Jersey's Ryan Malleck catching on with Giants at tight end", New York Daily News, July 31, 2016. Accessed January 29, 2018. "Two of the most impressive catches of Giants mini-camp in June required a double-take to identify jersey No. 88 as tight end Ryan Malleck, a rookie free-agent signing out of Virginia Tech, and a local kid born in Teaneck, who grew up down the shore in Point Pleasant rooting for the Giants and Eli Manning."
  129. ^ Teddy Mann Archived 2012-02-01 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Boxing Hall of Fame. Accessed November 1, 2013. "Born on September 5, 1951, Point Pleasant, NJ as Ted Groff. He changed his name legally to Ted Mannschreck in 1967, which evolved to Ted 'The Irish' Mann for promotional purposes in 1977."
  130. ^ Rose, Lisa. "Movie buff's vision: founder of N.J. cinema chain sees world of possibilities", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, January 20, 2013. Accessed September 21, 2015. "Bud Mayo, 71, of Point Pleasant, is a former investment banker who got his start in the film business 26 years ago."
  131. ^ Serrano, Ken. "Point Pleasant native picked to head U.S. Secret Service", Asbury Park Press, May 1, 2019. Accessed August 5, 2019. "Following a shakeup at the Department of Homeland Security in early April, a Point Pleasant native has been sworn is as the director of the U.S. Secret Service. James M. Murray, a 23-year veteran of the agency, took over as the 26th director Wednesday."
  132. ^ Scovell, Jane. Oona Living in the Shadows: A Biography of Oona O'Neill Chaplin p. 7. Hachette Digital, 2009. ISBN 9780446564946. "When at last Agnes returned to Point Pleasant, Oona was thrilled and so was Jim Delaney."
  133. ^ Kuperinsky, Amy. "Wrestling fans blast Nancy Grace after Diamond Dallas Page interview", The Star-Ledger, April 10, 2014. Accessed August 10, 2014. "Nancy Grace's interview with Diamond Dallas Page, a veteran wrestler from Point Pleasant, about the death of The Ultimate Warrior, has wrestling fans crying foul."
  134. ^ D'Alessandro, Dave. "NJ's Christie Rampone's quiet leadership as captain helps keep U.S. women's soccer on top", The Star-Ledger, July 27, 2012. Accessed August 10, 2014. "Christie Rampone, the Point Pleasant native who is the last link to the 1999 Women's World Cup championship team, is seeking her third Olympic soccer gold medal."
  135. ^ Obejas, Achy. "Soraya, a Singer Who Needed No Translation", The Washington Post, May 12, 2006. Accessed July 30, 2011. "Soraya was born in Point Pleasant, N.J., but spent her early years traveling to and from Cali, Colombia, her family's home town."
  136. ^ Rogers, Rick. "OSU choral conductor on getting to know his students", The Oklahoman, November 20, 2011. Accessed October 23, 2018. "Hometown: Point Pleasant, New Jersey."
  137. ^ Staff. "Auto News and Notes", Brooklyn Daily Eagle, August 11, 1904. Accessed September 21, 2015. "Arthur A. Zimmerman, the former cycle racing star, who is now a resident of Point Pleasant. N. J., will act as referee and E. C. Bald, another old cyclist, will be his assistant."

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