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Norwich South (UK Parliament constituency)

Norwich South is a constituency in Norfolk represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom,[n 1] since 2015 by Clive Lewis, of the Labour Party.[n 2]

Norwich South
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Norwich South in Norfolk.
Outline map
Location of Norfolk within England.
CountyNorfolk
Electorate73,569 (December 2010)[1]
Current constituency
Created1950
Member of parliamentClive Lewis (Labour)
Number of membersOne
Created fromNorwich
Overlaps
European Parliament constituencyEast of England

Contents

HistoryEdit

The constituency was created by the Representation of the People Act 1948 for the 1950 general election, when the two-seat Norwich constituency was divided into Norwich North and Norwich South. The Labour MP for this seat from 1997 to 2010 was Charles Clarke who served in the cabinet for five years from 2001 to 2006, first as Minister without Portfolio, then as Secretary of State for Education and Skills and latterly as Home Secretary.

Norwich South was Labour's safest seat in Norfolk until 2005. Although it was lost to the Conservatives in 1983, it was regained by Labour in 1987 and was the only Labour seat in Norfolk until 1997. In 2005 the Labour majority was cut by over 5000, leaving Norwich North as the safest Labour seat in the county.

At the 2010 election, the seat was considered a three-way marginal between the incumbent Labour party, the Liberal Democrats and the Conservatives. The seat was also targeted by the Green Party. The Liberal Democrats won the seat, with the lowest percentage share of the vote in a constituency in the 2010 election. The loss was considered an embarrassment for the Labour Party as it was the seat of a former Home Secretary.

In the 2015 election, Norwich South was the Green Party's number one target seat, and due to the tiny majority of just 310 votes for the Liberal Democrat Simon Wright over Labour in the previous election, it was a key Labour target. In the event, Wright came fourth with under half his 2010 vote, behind the Greens, Conservatives and Labour, whose left-wing candidate Clive Lewis won the seat with a 10.6% swing from the Liberal Democrats to Labour. The Green Party share of the vote actually fell by 1% compared to 2010, with the Conservative vote slightly increasing.

In the 2017 election, UKIP did not contest the seat but endorsed the Conservatives.[2] Clive Lewis increased Labour's vote share by 22 percentage points to win 31,311 votes (61.0%), the most votes any party has ever won in the constituency. This happened despite the Conservative share of the vote also increasing by 7.1%. The swing was entirely from the Liberal Democrats (who had held the seat from 2010 to 2015) whose vote fell to 5.5%, and the Green Party (who had made the seat a top target in 2015) who dropped to 2.9%, their worst result in Norwich South since 1997.

Boundaries and boundary changesEdit

1950–1974: The County Borough of Norwich wards of Ber Street, Conesford, Earlham, Eaton, Lakenham, Nelson, St Stephen, and Town Close.[3]

1974–1983: The County Borough of Norwich wards of Bowthorpe, Earlham, Eaton, Lakenham, Nelson, St Stephen, Town Close, and University.[4]

Further to the Second Periodic Review of Parliamentary Constituencies a redistribution of seats was enacted in 1970. However, in the case of the two Norwich constituencies, this was superseded before the February 1974 general election by the Parliamentary Constituencies (Norwich) Order 1973 which followed on from a revision of the County Borough of Norwich wards in 1971, resulting in a realignment of the boundary with Norwich North.

1983–1997: The City of Norwich wards of Bowthorpe, Eaton, Heigham, Henderson, Lakenham, Mancroft, Nelson, St Stephen, Thorpe Hamlet, Town Close, and University.[5]

Extended northwards, gaining southern parts of Norwich North.

1997–2010: The City of Norwich wards of Bowthorpe, Eaton, Heigham, Henderson, Lakenham, Mancroft, Nelson, St Stephen, Thorpe Hamlet, Town Close, and University, and the District of South Norfolk wards of Cringleford and Colney, and New Costessey.[6]

The two District of South Norfolk wards were transferred from the constituency of South Norfolk.

2010–present: The City of Norwich wards of Bowthorpe, Eaton, Lakenham, Mancroft, Nelson, Thorpe Hamlet, Town Close, University, and Wensum, and the District of South Norfolk ward of New Costessey.[7]

Following their review of parliamentary constituencies in Norfolk that concluded in 2004 and came into effect for the 2010 general election, the Boundary Commission for England created a slightly modified Norwich South constituency. The part of the Crome ward around Morse Road became part of Norwich North, while the area around Mousehold Street in Thorpe Hamlet moved to Norwich South. The villages of Cringleford and Colney were lost to the South Norfolk constituency.

The changes were necessary to re-align the constituency boundaries with the new local government ward boundaries introduced in South Norfolk and Norwich in 2003 and 2004 respectively and to take account of Norfolk being awarded an additional, ninth constituency by the Boundary Commission.

Proposals for 2022Edit

The Boundary Commission for England submitted their final proposals in respect of the Sixth Periodic Review of Westminster Constituencies (the 2018 review) in September 2018. If these proposals are approved by Parliament they will reduce the total number of MPs from 650 to 600 and come into effect at the next UK general election which is due to take place in May 2022 under the terms of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011.

In order to meet the strict requirements of the electoral quota range, the Commission have recommended that the District of South Norfolk ward of Cringleford and Old Costessey would be transferred from the constituency of South Norfolk, partly offset by the transfer of the City of Norwich ward of Wensum to Norwich North.[8]

Members of ParliamentEdit

ElectionsEdit

Elections in the 2010sEdit

General Election 2017: Norwich South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Clive Lewis 31,311 61.0 +21.7
Conservative Lana Hempsall 15,715 30.6 +7.1
Liberal Democrat James Wright 2,841 5.5 -8.1
Green Richard Bearman 1,492 2.9 -11.0
Majority 15,596 30.4 +14.6
Turnout 51,359 69.2 +4.5
Labour hold Swing +7.3
General Election 2015: Norwich South[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Clive Lewis 19,033 39.3 +10.6
Conservative Lisa Townsend 11,379 23.5 +0.6
Green Lesley Grahame 6,749 13.9 -1.0
Liberal Democrat Simon Wright 6,607 13.6 -15.7
UKIP Steve Emmens 4,539 9.4 +7.0
Class War David Peel 96 0.2 N/A
Independent Cengiz Ceker 60 0.1 N/A
Majority 7,654 15.8
Turnout 48,463 64.7 +0.1
Labour gain from Liberal Democrat Swing +5.0
General Election 2010: Norwich South[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Simon Wright 13,960 29.4 N/A
Labour Charles Clarke 13,650 28.7 N/A
Conservative Antony Little 10,902 22.9 N/A
Green Adrian Ramsay 7,095 14.9 N/A
UKIP Stephen Emmens 1,145 2.4 N/A
BNP Len Heather 697 1.5 N/A
Workers Revolutionary Gabriel Polley 102 0.2 N/A
Majority 310 0.7 N/A
Turnout 47,551 64.6 N/A
Liberal Democrat win (new seat)

*NB boundary changes occurred between 2005 and 2010.

Elections in the 2000sEdit

General Election 2005: Norwich South[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Charles Clarke 15,904 37.7 −7.8
Liberal Democrat Andrew Aalders-Dunthorne 12,251 29.0 +6.4
Conservative Antony Little 9,567 22.7 −2.1
Green Adrian Ramsay 3,101 7.4 +4.0
UKIP Vandra Ahlstrom 597 1.4 +0.3
English Democrat Christine Constable 466 1.1 N/A
Legalise Cannabis Don Barnard 219 0.5 −1.0
Workers Revolutionary Roger Blackwell 85 0.2 N/A
Majority 3,653 8.7
Turnout 42,190 65.0 +5.2
Labour hold Swing −7.1
General Election 2001: Norwich South[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Charles Clarke 19,367 45.5 −6.2
Conservative Andrew French 10,551 24.8 +1.1
Liberal Democrat Andrew Aalders-Dunthorne 9,640 22.6 +4.0
Green Adrian Holmes 1,434 3.4 +1.9
Legalise Cannabis Alun Buffrey 620 1.5 0.0
Socialist Alliance Edward Manningham 507 1.2 N/A
UKIP Tarquin Mills 473 1.1 N/A
Majority 8,816 20.7
Turnout 42,592 59.8 −12.8
Labour hold Swing -3.65

Elections in the 1990sEdit

General Election 1997: Norwich South[14][15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Charles Clarke 26,267 51.7 +3.0
Conservative Bashir Khanbhai 12,028 23.7 −12.9
Liberal Democrat Andrew Aalders-Dunthorne 9,457 18.6 +5.7
Referendum David Holdsworth 1,464 2.9 N/A
Legalise Cannabis Howard Marks 765 1.5 N/A
Green Adrian Holmes 736 1.4 −0.2
Natural Law Bryan Parsons 84 0.2 0.0
Majority 14,239 28.0
Turnout 50,801 72.6 −8.0
Labour hold Swing +8.0
General Election 1992: Norwich South[16][17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Garrett 24,965 48.7 +10.8
Conservative David Baxter 18,784 36.6 −0.6
Liberal Democrat Christopher Thomas 6,609 12.9 −12.0
Green Adrian Holmes 803 1.6 N/A
Natural Law Bryan Parsons 104 0.2 N/A
Majority 6,181 12.1 +11.4
Turnout 51,265 80.6 +0.0
Labour hold Swing +5.7

Elections in the 1980sEdit

General Election 1987: Norwich South[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Garrett 19,666 37.9 +2.6
Conservative John Powley 19,330 37.3 −1.5
Social Democratic Charles Hardie 12,896 24.9 +0.4
Majority 336 0.7
Turnout 51,892 80.6 +4.2
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +2.1
General Election 1983: Norwich South[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Powley 18,998 38.8 −2.8
Labour John Garrett 17,286 35.3 −9.6
Social Democratic Charles Hardie 11,968 24.5 N/A
Ecology Anthony D. Carter 468 1.0 N/A
National Front Peter C. Williams 145 0.3 −0.4
Independent Jon C. Ward 91 0.2 N/A
Majority 1,712 3.5
Turnout 48,956 76.4 −3.8
Conservative gain from Labour Swing +3.4

Elections in the 1970sEdit

General Election 1979: Norwich South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Garrett 16,240 44.9 −2.2
Conservative I. Coutts 15,042 41.6 +4.1
Liberal P. Mackintosh 4,618 12.8 −2.6
National Front Andrew Fountaine 264 0.7 N/A
Majority 1,198 3.3
Turnout 36,164 80.2 +1.7
Labour hold Swing −3.2
General Election October 1974: Norwich South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Garrett 16,590 47.1 +5.8
Conservative M. Tomison 13,185 37.5 −2.0
Liberal P.G. Smith 5,429 15.4 −3.9
Majority 3,405 9.7
Turnout 35,204 78.5 −5.5
Labour hold Swing +3.9
General Election February 1974: Norwich South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Garrett 15,393 41.3 −3.4
Conservative Thomas Stuttaford 14,741 39.5 −7.5
Liberal L. Parker 7,183 19.3 +11.0
Majority 652 1.8
Turnout 37,317 84.0 +5.8
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +2.1
General Election 1970: Norwich South[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Thomas Stuttaford 17,067 47.0 +1.8
Labour Conrad Ascher 16,241 44.7 −10.1
Liberal Lesley Parker 3,031 8.3 N/A
Majority 826 2.3
Turnout 36,339 78.2 −5.0
Conservative gain from Labour Swing +6.0

Elections in the 1960sEdit

General Election 1966: Norwich South[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Christopher Norwood 19,163 54.8 +3.9
Conservative Anthony Gurney 15,808 45.2 −3.9
Majority 3,355 9.6
Turnout 34,971 83.2 +3.9
Labour hold Swing +3.9
General Election 1964: Norwich South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Christopher Norwood 17,973 50.9 +4.0
Conservative Geoffrey Rippon 17,362 49.1 −4.0
Majority 611 1.7
Turnout 35,335 82.7 +3.9
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +4.0

Elections in the 1950sEdit

General Election 1959: Norwich South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Geoffrey Rippon 19,128 53.1 +0.6
Labour George Wallace 16,884 46.9 −0.6
Majority 2,244 6.2
Turnout 36,012 82.2 +3.9
Conservative hold Swing +0.6
General Election 1955: Norwich South[22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Geoffrey Rippon 18,659 52.5 +0.0
Labour Mabel Tylecote 16,901 47.5 +0.0
Majority 1,758 4.9
Turnout 35,560 78.3 −6.0
Conservative hold Swing +0.0
General Election 1951: Norwich South[23]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Henry Strauss 19,082 52.5 −0.8
Labour Mabel Tylecote 17,234 47.5 +0.8
Majority 1,848 5.1
Turnout 36,316 84.3 −0.7
Conservative hold Swing −0.8
General Election 1950: Norwich South[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Henry Strauss 18,693 53.3 N/A
Labour Mabel Tylecote 16,368 46.7 N/A
Majority 2,325 6.6 N/A
Turnout 35,061 85.0 N/A
Conservative win (new seat)

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Electorate Figures – Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  2. ^ Grimmer, Dan. "UKIP announce they will not have Norwich general election candidates and urge supporters to 'lend' votes to Conservatives". Eastern Daily Press. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  3. ^ "Representation of the People Act, 1948". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 15 March 2019.
  4. ^ "The Parliamentary Constituencies (Norwich) Order 1973". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 15 March 2019.
  5. ^ "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1983". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 15 March 2019.
  6. ^ "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1995". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 15 March 2019.
  7. ^ "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 2007". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 15 March 2019.
  8. ^ Boundary Commission for England, 2018 Review, Associated consultation documents (September 2018). "Final recommendations report".CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  9. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "N" (part 3)
  10. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  11. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  12. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  13. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  14. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  15. ^ "Norwich South". The Guardian.
  16. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  17. ^ "UK General Election results April 1992". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  18. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  19. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  20. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1970.
  21. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1966.
  22. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1955.
  23. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1951.
  24. ^ The Times' Guide to the House of Commons. 1950.

Coordinates: 52°37′N 1°16′E / 52.62°N 1.27°E / 52.62; 1.27