Nanda (Hinduism)

According to the Harivamsha and the Puranas, Nanda was a Kshatriya chief[2] and the foster-father of Krishna.[3] Nanda was the son of Parjanya,[4][5] a ruler of the Mahavan-Braj region,[6] who was a son of the Yadava king Devamida.[7] Nanda was the chief of Gokula, which was one of the most powerful divisional areas of the Yadava tribe.[8]

Nanda
Indischer Maler um 1755 002.jpg
Nanda and Yashoda pushing baby Krishna on a swing
Devanagariनंद
TextsBhagavata Purana, Harivamsa, Vishnu Purana, Mahabharata [1]
Personal information
SpouseYashoda
ChildrenKrishna, Balrama (adopted) and Yogamaya (biological)
DynastyYadava/Yaduvanshi (chandravanshi)

Nanda was the cousin of Vasudeva, and they were also close friends.[7][9][8][10] Vasudeva took his newborn son, Krishna, to Nanda on the night of the child's birth so that Nanda could raise him. Nanda, who was married to Yashoda, brought up both Krishna and his brother, Balarama. Krishna derives his name Nandanandana (son of Nanda) from him.[11][12]

Nanda's storyEdit

Yadu
Yadava Dynasty (After 74 generations)
Vrishni (Yadava King)
VesparnaDevamida (Yadava King)Madisha
Parjanya (Yadava King)Vareeyasi (Yadava Queen)Surasena (Yadava King)Marisha (Princess)
Nanda Baba (Yadava King)Yasoda (Yadava Queen)Vasudeva (Yadava Prince)Devaki (Kamsa's Sister)
Yogmaya in the disguise of a child born to YasodaKrishna

'King' NandaEdit

Nanda was the foster-father of Krishna. He also helped to raise Balarama. Nanda, identified as King Nanda in many scriptures[13]was a kinsman and a great friend of Vasudeva.[14] The fact that King Nanda and King Vasudeva were cousins is confirmed both by Bhagavata Purana, Book 10, and Mahabharata.[15][16]

Krishna and NandaEdit

According to Bhagavata Purana, King Nanda of Gokul Kingdom was brother of King Vasudeva.[17]

King Vasudeva married Devaki, the daughter of King Ugrasena of Mathura. Devaki's brother, an evil tyrant named Kamsa, had imprisoned Ugrasena and usurped the throne. Owing to the divine prediction that Kamsa would be slain by the eighth child of Devaki, Kamsa arranged that all of Devaki's sons should die at birth. Six children thus perished.[18] Vasudeva wife give birth to Balarama and Krishna himself was placed by Vasudeva into the hands of Nanda. Both Krishna and Balrama were brought up by Nanda, the cowherd chief and his wife Yashoda.[19][20]

[21]

In popular cultureEdit

 
nandagaon
 
Women waiting for Gopis in the streets of Nandgaon during Lath mar Holi

NandagaonEdit

Nandagaon is one of the religious places near Barsana in Braj. It was capital of feudal Nanda Baba, where he resided with his followers and the cowherds.[22]

Nanda Bhawan (Chaurasi Khamba Mandir)Edit

The residence of Nanda, known as Nanda Bhawan, where Krishna grew up and spent the first three years of his childhood is a main and most famous temple in Mahavan. This yellow coloured building has many wall paintings depicting pastimes of Krishna has 84 pillars inside. It is believed that there are 84,00,000 species in this material world and each pillar is said to symbolize 100,000 species, thus representing all the life in the universe.[23]

Nanda GhataEdit

Nanda Ghata is situated on the bank of the sacred river Yamuna. The Ghata (Riverbank) is related to the rescue of Nanda Baba's abduction by the followers of God Baruna, while Nanda was taking bath in a holy river Yamuna.[24]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brahmavaivarta Purana Sri-Krishna Janma Khanda (Fourth Canto) Chapter 13.Verse 224 English translation by Shantilal Nagar Parimal Publications Link: https://archive.org/details/brahma-vaivarta-purana-all-four-kandas-english-translation
  2. ^ Soni, Lok Nath (2000). The Cattle and the Stick: An Ethnographic Profile of the Raut of Chhattisgarh. Anthropological Survey of India, Government of India, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, Department of Culture. p. 13. ISBN 978-81-85579-57-3.
  3. ^ His Divine Grace A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupad. Krsna, the Supreme Personality of Godhead- Chepter-5. The Bhaktivedanta Book Trust. ISBN 978-9171495587.
  4. ^ Swarup Das (1999). Śrī Śrī 84 Krosh Vrajamaṇḍala. Samir Debanth.
  5. ^ A. W. Entwistle (1987). Braj: Centre of Krishna Pilgrimage. E. Forsten. ISBN 978-90-6980-016-5.
  6. ^ "Mahavan". Radhanath Swami Yatras. Retrieved 9 May 2021.
  7. ^ a b Viśvanātha Cakravartī (2004). Sārārtha Darśini: Tenth Canto Commnetaries [of] Srimad Bhagavatam. Mahanidhi Swami.
  8. ^ a b Gopal Chowdhary (2014). The Greatest Farce of History. Partridge Publishing. p. 119. ISBN 978-1482819250.
  9. ^ Sanghi, Ashwin (2012). The Krishna key. Chennai: Westland. p. Key7. ISBN 9789381626689. Retrieved 9 June 2016.
  10. ^ Lok Nath Soni (2000). The Cattle and the Stick: An Ethnographic Profile of the Raut of Chhattisgarh. Anthropological Survey of India, Government of India, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, Department of Culture, Delhi: Anthropological Survey of India, Government of India, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, Department of Culture, 2000 Original from the University of Michigan. p. 16. ISBN 978-8185579573.
  11. ^ John Stratton Hawley (2014). At Play with Krishna: Pilgrimage Dramas from Brindaran. Princeton Legacy Library: Princeton University Press. p. 316. ISBN 978-1400859122.
  12. ^ Charles Barnett (2014). Blazing Sadhus or Never Trust a Holy Man Who Can't Dance. Charles Barnett. pp. III. ISBN 978-1632958624.
  13. ^ Carl Woodham (2011). A God Who Dances: Krishna for You. Torchlight Publishing. pp. 95, 99, 103, 104. ISBN 978-0981727363.
  14. ^ Prem ságar; or, The ocean of love. Oxford University. 1867. p. 18.
  15. ^ Carl Olson (2007). Hindu Primary Sources: A Sectarian Reader. Rutgers University Press. pp. 240–. ISBN 978-0-8135-4070-2. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  16. ^ Jīva Gosvāmī (2006). Śrī Kr̥ṣṇa-sandarbha. Rasbiharilal & sons. ISBN 978-81-8403-018-1. Retrieved 21 August 2017.
  17. ^ Carl Woodham (2011). A God Who Dances: Krishna for You. Torchlight Publishing. p. 96. ISBN 978-0981727363.
  18. ^ Carl Woodham (2011). A God Who Dances: Krishna for You. Torchlight Publishing. p. 84. ISBN 978-0981727363.
  19. ^ Carl Woodham (2011). A God Who Dances: Krishna for You. Torchlight Publishing. pp. 103–121. ISBN 978-0981727363.
  20. ^ Winthrop Sargeant, Christopher Key Chapple (1984). The Bhagavad Gita: Revised Edition. SUNY Press. pp. 9, 14. ISBN 978-0873958318.
  21. ^ Jürgen Neuß (2012). Narmad?parikram? - Circumambulation of the Narmad? River: On the Tradition of a Unique Hindu Pilgrimage Volume 42 of Brill's Indological Library. BRILL. p. 265. ISBN 978-9004228573.
  22. ^ Trilochan Dash (2012). Krishna Leeela in Brajamandal a Retrospect. Saudamini Dash. p. 196.
  23. ^ Dev Prasad (2010). Krishna: A Journey through the Lands & Legends of Krishna. Jaico Publishing House. ISBN 978-8184951707.
  24. ^ Trilochan Dash (2012). Krishna Leeela in Brajamandal a Retrospect. Saudamini Dash. p. 211.