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NAIA Football National Championship

The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) Football National Championship is decided by a post-season playoff system featuring the best NAIA college football teams in the United States. Under sponsorship of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, the championship game has been played annually since 1956.[1] In 1970, NAIA football was divided into two divisions, Division I and Division II, with a championship game played in each division. In 1997, NAIA football was again consolidated into one division. The game is currently played at Daytona Stadium in Daytona Beach, Florida.[2]

NAIA Football National Championship
In operation1956–present
Preceded bySmall college polls &
NAIA Division II Championship
Number of playoff teams16
Championship trophyTom Osborne Trophy
Television partner(s)ESPN3
Most playoff championshipsTexas A&I (7)
Current championMorningside (IA)
WebsiteNAIA Football

Texas A&I (now known as Texas A&M–Kingsville) have been the most prolific program with seven NAIA championships. Carroll (MT) are the most successful team still playing at the NAIA level, with 6 national titles.

Morningside (IA) are the current champions, having defeated Benedictine (KS) in the 2018 championship, 35-28.

Game nameEdit

Over the years, the NAIA championship games were played under a variety of names:

  • Aluminum Bowl (1956)
  • Holiday Bowl (1957–1960)[a]
  • Camellia Bowl (1961–1963)[b]
  • Champion Bowl (1964–1976 and 1980–1996, Division I games only)
  • Apple Bowl (1977, Division I game only)
  • Palm Bowl (1978–1979, Division I games only)

A separate NAIA Division II Football National Championship was played between 1970 and 1996, when there were two divisions at the NAIA level.

ResultsEdit

Year Champion Score Runner-up Site Winning head coach(es)
1956 Montana State
Saint Joseph's (IN)
0–0[c] Little Rock, Arkansas Tony Storti
Bob Jauron
1957 Pittsburg State 27–26 Hillsdale Saint Petersburg, Florida Carnie Smith
1958 Northeastern State 19–13 Arizona State–Flagstaff Saint Petersburg, Florida Harold "Tuffy" Stratton
1959 Texas A&I 20–7 Lenoir–Rhyne Saint Petersburg, Florida Gil Steinke
1960 Lenoir–Rhyne 15–14 Humboldt State Saint Petersburg, Florida Phil Sarboe
1961 Pittsburg State 12–7 Linfield Sacramento, California Carnie Smith
1962 Central State (OK) 28–13 Lenoir–Rhyne Sacramento, California Al Blevins
1963 Saint John's (MN) 33–27 Prairie View A&M Sacramento, California John Gagliardi
1964 Concordia (MN)
Sam Houston State
7–7[c] Augusta, Georgia Jake Christiansen
Paul Pierce
1965 Saint John's (MN) 33–0 Linfield Augusta, Georgia John Gagliardi
1966 Waynesburg 42–21 Wisconsin–Whitewater Tulsa, Oklahoma Carl DePasqua
1967 Fairmont State 28–21 Eastern Washington Morgantown, West Virginia Harold "Deacon" Duvall
1968 Troy State 43–35 Texas A&I Montgomery, Alabama Billy Atkins
1969 Texas A&I 32–7 Concordia (MN) Kingsville, Texas Gil Steinke
1970 Texas A&I 48–7 Wofford Greenville, South Carolina Gil Steinke
1971 Livingston 14–12 Arkansas Tech Birmingham, Alabama Mickey Andrews
1972 East Texas State 21–18 Carson–Newman Commerce, Texas Ernest Hawkins
1973 Abilene Christian 42–14 Elon Shreveport, Louisiana Wally Bullington
1974 Texas A&I 34–23 Henderson State Kingsville, Texas Gil Steinke
1975 Texas A&I 37–0 Salem Kingsville, Texas Gil Steinke
1976 Texas A&I 26–0 Central Arkansas Kingsville, Texas Gil Steinke
1977 Abilene Christian 24–7 Southwestern Oklahoma State Seattle, Washington DeWitt Jones
1978 Angelo State 34–14 Elon McAllen, Texas Jim Hess
1979 Texas A&I 20–14 Central State (OK) McAllen, Texas Ron Harms
1980 Elon 17–10 Northeastern State Burlington, North Carolina Jerry Tolley
1981 Elon 3–0 Pittsburg State Burlington, North Carolina Jerry Tolley
1982 Central State (OK) 14–11 Mesa State Edmond, Oklahoma Gary Howard
1983 Carson–Newman 36–28 Mesa State Grand Junction, Colorado Ken Sparks
1984 Carson–Newman
Central Arkansas
19–19[c] Conway, Arkansas Ken Sparks
Harold Horton
1985 Hillsdale
Central Arkansas
10–10[c] Conway, Arkansas Dick Lowry
Harold Horton
1986 Carson–Newman 17–0 Cameron Jefferson City, Tennessee Ken Sparks
1987 Cameron 30–2 Carson–Newman Lawton, Oklahoma Brian Naber
1988 Carson–Newman 56–21 Adams State Jefferson City, Tennessee Ken Sparks
1989 Carson–Newman 34–20 Emporia State Jefferson City, Tennessee Ken Sparks
1990 Central State (OH) 38–16 Mesa State Grand Junction, Colorado Billy Joe
1991 Central Arkansas 19–16 Central State (OH) Wilberforce, Ohio Mike Isom
1992 Central State (OH) 19–16 Gardner–Webb Boiling Springs, North Carolina Billy Joe
1993 East Central 49–35 Glenville State Ada, Oklahoma Hank Walbrick
1994 Northeastern State 13–12 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Pine Bluff, Arkansas Tom Eckert
1995 Central State (OH) 37–7 Northeastern State Tahlequah, Oklahoma Rick Comegy
1996 Southwestern Oklahoma State 33–31 Montana Tech Weatherford, Oklahoma Paul Sharp
1997 Findlay 14–7 Willamette Savannah, Tennessee Dick Strahm
1998 Azusa Pacific 17–14 Olivet Nazarene Savannah, Tennessee Vic Shealy
1999 Northwestern Oklahoma State 34–26 Georgetown (KY) Savannah, Tennessee Tim Albin
2000 Georgetown (KY) 20–0 Northwestern Oklahoma State Savannah, Tennessee Bill Cronin
2001 Georgetown (KY) 49–27 Sioux Falls Savannah, Tennessee Bill Cronin
2002 Carroll (MT) 28–7 Georgetown (KY) Savannah, Tennessee Mike Van Diest
2003 Carroll (MT) 41–28 Northwestern Oklahoma State Savannah, Tennessee Mike Van Diest
2004 Carroll (MT) 15–13 (2 OT) Saint Francis (IN) Savannah, Tennessee Mike Van Diest
2005 Carroll (MT) 27–10 Saint Francis (IN) Savannah, Tennessee Mike Van Diest
2006 Sioux Falls 23–19 Saint Francis (IN) Savannah, Tennessee Kalen DeBoer
2007 Carroll (MT) 17–9 Sioux Falls Savannah, Tennessee Mike Van Diest
2008 Sioux Falls 23–7 Carroll (MT) Rome, Georgia Kalen DeBoer
2009 Sioux Falls 25–22 Lindenwood Rome, Georgia Kalen DeBoer
2010 Carroll (MT) 10–7 Sioux Falls Rome, Georgia Mike Van Diest
2011 Saint Xavier 24–20 Carroll (MT) Rome, Georgia Mike Feminis
2012 Marian 30–27 (OT) Morningside Rome, Georgia Ted Karras Jr.
2013 Grand View 35–23 Cumberlands (KY) Rome, Georgia Mike Woodley
2014 Southern Oregon 55–31 Marian Daytona Beach, Florida Craig Howard
2015 Marian 31–14 Southern Oregon Daytona Beach, Florida Mark Henninger
2016 Saint Francis (IN) 38–17 Baker Daytona Beach, Florida Kevin Donley
2017 Saint Francis (IN) 24–13 Reinhardt Daytona Beach, Florida Kevin Donley
2018 Morningside 35–28 Benedictine Daytona Beach, Florida Steve Ryan
  1. ^ Not to be confused with the NCAA Division I bowl of the same name.
  2. ^ Not to be confused with the NCAA Division I bowl of the same name.
  3. ^ a b c d Game ended in a tie with both teams as co-champions.

Championships by schoolEdit

Team Championships Winning years
Texas A&I (Texas A&M–Kingsville) 7 1959, 1969, 1970, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1979
Carroll 6 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2010
Carson-Newman 5 1983, 1984[a], 1986, 1988, 1989
Central Arkansas 3 1984[a], 1985[a], 1991
Central State (OH) 3 1990, 1992, 1995
Sioux Falls 3 2006, 2008, 2009
Pittsburg State 2 1957, 1961
Saint John's (MN) 2 1963, 1965
Abilene Christian 2 1973, 1977
Elon 2 1980, 1981
Central State (OK) (Central Oklahoma) 2 1962, 1982
Northeastern State 2 1958, 1994
Georgetown (KY) 2 2000, 2001
Marian 2 2012, 2015
Saint Francis (IN) 2 2016, 2017
Montana State 1 1956[a]
Saint Joseph's (IN) 1 1956[a]
Lenoir–Rhyne 1 1960
Concordia–Moorhead 1 1964[a]
Sam Houston State 1 1964[a]
Waynesburg 1 1966
Fairmont State 1 1967
Troy State 1 1968
Livingston 1 1971
East Texas State (Texas A&M–Commerce) 1 1972
Angelo State 1 1978
Hillsdale 1 1985[a]
Cameron 1 1987
East Central (OK) 1 1993
Southwestern Oklahoma 1 1996
Findlay (OH) 1 1997
Azusa Pacific 1 1998
Northwestern Oklahoma 1 1999
Saint Xavier 1 2011
Grand View 1 2013
Southern Oregon 1 2014
Morningside 1 2018
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Shared title

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "NAIA Football Championship History". National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved April 7, 2008. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. ^ http://www.naia.org/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=27900&ATCLID=205337130