Margaret G. Kibben

Margaret Grun Kibben (born 1960)[1] is a U.S. Presbyterian minister who is the chaplain of the United States House of Representatives. She served as the 26th Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy from 2014 to 2018; she was formerly the 18th Chaplain of the United States Marine Corps (CHMC) and the Deputy Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy from 2010 to 2014. Kibben was the first woman to hold each of these positions.

Margaret Kibben
Margaret Grun Kibben.jpg
61st Chaplain of the United States House of Representatives
Assumed office
January 3, 2021
Preceded byPat Conroy
26th Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy
In office
August 2, 2014 – July 22, 2018
Preceded byMark L. Tidd
Succeeded byBrent W. Scott
18th Chaplain of the United States Marine Corps
In office
May 14, 2010 – July 24, 2014
Preceded byMark L. Tidd
Succeeded byBrent W. Scott
Personal details
Born
Margaret Ellen Grun

1960 (age 60–61)
Warrington, Pennsylvania, U.S.
EducationGoucher College (BA)
Princeton Theological Seminary (MDiv, DMin)
Naval War College (MA)
Military service
Allegiance United States
Branch/service United States Navy
Years of service1986–2018
RankUS Navy O8 infobox.svg Rear Admiral
Awards

Early life and educationEdit

A native of Warrington, Pennsylvania, Kibben entered active duty in the U.S. Navy in 1986.[2] She earned a B.A. degree from Goucher College in Towson, Maryland in 1982. Kibben received both her Masters of Divinity (1986) and her Doctor of Ministry (2002) degrees from Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, New Jersey. She also earned an M.A. degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College in 1996.[3] Kibben was a senior fellow at the United States Institute of Peace.[4]

Military careerEdit

Kibben's Marine Corps assignments have included Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, where she served with Headquarters and Service Battalion, Security Battalion, the Brig, Marine Corps Air Facility and the president's Helicopter Squadron, HMX-1. She also served with the Marines of Second Force Service Support Group Camp Lejeune, N.C., making deployments to both Turkey and Norway. Later she was assigned to the Marine Corps Combat Development Command in Quantico as the doctrine writer for Religious Ministry.[4]

Kibben's Navy assignments include the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland as the first female chaplain. She was the Navy Chaplain Corps historian at the Chaplain Resource Board and the command chaplain, USS San Diego (AFS-6), in Norfolk, Virginia. As U.S. 3rd Fleet chaplain, Kibben was responsible for the training and certification of all carrier strike group and expeditionary strike group religious ministry teams. She completed a deployment as the command chaplain, Combined Forces Command Afghanistan as an individual augmentee.[4]

Kibben was detailed to the Office of the Chief of Navy Chaplains, first serving as the director for Force Structure and Community Management and then as the executive assistant to the chief of Navy Chaplains.[4]

Kibben was the 18th Chaplain of the United States Marine Corps (CHMC) and the Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy. She was the first woman to hold this office.[5][6]

 
26th Chief of Navy Chaplains

The Chief of Navy Chaplains is the Senior Chaplain in the Navy, the Head of the U.S. Navy Chaplain Corps, and the Director of Religious Ministry Support for the Department of the Navy.[7] He or she advises the Secretary of the Navy, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, the Chief of Naval Operations, and the Commandant of the Coast Guard "on all matters pertaining to religion within the Navy, United States Marine Corps, and United States Coast Guard."

 
Rear Adm. Kibben was relieved by Rear Adm. Brent Scott in July 2018.

After retirement from the Navy, Kibben became a lecturer in Leadership and Ethics at the School of Engineering of the Catholic University of America.[3][8]

Chaplain of the House of RepresentativesEdit

On December 31, 2020, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi appointed Rear Adm. Margaret Grun Kibben as the next House chaplain, making her the first woman to serve as chaplain in either chamber of Congress.[9] Her third day as House chaplain was marked by both the 2021 United States Electoral College vote count and the accompanying violent protests, during which she offered prayers upon the evacuation of House members.[10]

Awards and decorationsEdit

   
 
   
     
1st row Navy Distinguished Service Medal Legion of Merit with one gold award star[4] Bronze Star[4]
2nd row Meritorious Service Medal with two award stars[4] Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with two award stars[4] Joint Meritorious Unit Award[4]
3rd row Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation with two bronze service stars[4] Navy "E" Ribbon[4] Fleet Marine Force Ribbon[4]
4th row National Defense Service Medal with service star[4] Southwest Asia Service Medal with service star[4] Afghanistan Campaign Medal with service star[4]
5th row Global War on Terrorism Service Medal[4] Navy Sea Service Deployment Ribbon[4] Kuwaiti Kuwait Liberation[4]

Personal lifeEdit

Kibben is the daughter of William Allen Grun (April 24, 1920 – March 25, 2019)[11] and Jean Marie "Micki" (McFall) Grun (November 25, 1926 – June 19, 2009).[12] She has one sister. Her father served in the Naval Reserve during World War II, retiring from service as a lieutenant commander.[13]

Kibben is married to Timothy J. Kibben, a retired U.S. Marine Corps lieutenant colonel. The couple has a daughter.[2]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Navy.

  1. ^ Register of Commissioned and Warrant Officers of the United States Navy on Active Duty. Bureau of Naval Personnel. October 1, 1990. p. 315. Retrieved June 21, 2021.
  2. ^ a b "Rear Admiral Margaret Kibben". Wellesley College. Retrieved December 2, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Rear Admiral (retired) Margaret Kibben". The Catholic University of America School of Engineering. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Rear Admiral Margaret G. Kibben, USN". Biographies. United States Navy. Archived from the original on September 20, 2012. Retrieved October 6, 2010.
  5. ^ www.marines.mil, retrieved May 12, 2011. Archived October 5, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ marinesmagazine, retrieved May 13, 2011. Archived January 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "SECNAVINST 1730.1B" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 17, 2012. Retrieved May 13, 2011.
  8. ^ "Requirements". The Catholic University of America School of Engineering. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  9. ^ "OPNAVINST 1730.1D" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on August 14, 2011. Retrieved May 12, 2011.
  10. ^ How House chaplain calmed tense hours in besieged Capitol with prayers for ‘God’s covering’, Religion News Service
  11. ^ "'Birdhouse' Bill Grun, 98, certainly didn't act his age". Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania: Synod of the Trinity. March 27, 2019. Retrieved June 21, 2021.
  12. ^ "Jean Marie "Micki" McFall Grun". Find A Grave. Retrieved June 21, 2021.
  13. ^ Gianficaro, Phil (November 10, 2013). "World War II vet fanning freedom's flame". The Intelligencer. Langhorne, Pennsylvania. Retrieved June 21, 2021.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Margaret G. Kibben at Wikimedia Commons

Military offices
Preceded by Chaplain of the United States Marine Corps
2010–2014
Succeeded by
Deputy Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy
2010–2014
Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy
2014–2018
Religious titles
Preceded by Chaplain of the United States House of Representatives
2021–present
Incumbent