March 1930

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The following events occurred in March 1930:

March 1, 1930 (Saturday)Edit

March 2, 1930 (Sunday)Edit

March 3, 1930 (Monday)Edit

March 4, 1930 (Tuesday)Edit

  • The London Naval Disarmament Conference reopened after two weeks' adjournment due to the French cabinet crisis.[6]

March 5, 1930 (Wednesday)Edit

  • London stockbroker Buckmaster & Moore caused a stir in the British banking world when it issued a circular to its clients advising them to sell their shares in British industry and invest in the United States and Canada instead. It expressed the opinion that England's business depression was part of a permanent decline, while "the economic, the political and climatic advantages of the United States and Canada in the next few decades will be so overwhelmingly great that these countries offer the most attractive field for investment."[7]
  • Born: Del Crandall, baseball player, in Ontario, California

March 6, 1930 (Thursday)Edit

March 7, 1930 (Friday)Edit

  • Hjalmar Schacht quit as President of the Reichsbank, explaining he could not agree to the ratification of the Young Plan in its present version because it had been "adulterated by politicians in the last fourteen months."[11]
  • President Herbert Hoover said that all evidence indicated "that the worst effects of the crash upon unemployment will have been passed during the next sixty days with the amelioration of seasonal unemployment, the gaining strength of other forces, and the continued cooperation of the many agencies actively cooperating with the government to restore business and to relieve distress."[12]
  • Born: Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon, photographer and filmmaker, in London, England

March 8, 1930 (Saturday)Edit

March 9, 1930 (Sunday)Edit

March 10, 1930 (Monday)Edit

  • 105 people, almost all children, were killed when a fire broke out in a warehouse showing a film at the Chinkai Guard District in Korea. The movie was about the Battle of Mukden, marking the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Japanese victory in that battle, and most of the 600 gathered to watch the film were Japanese naval officers and their families.[18]
  • Born: Claude Bolling, jazz musician, in Cannes, France

March 11, 1930 (Tuesday)Edit

March 12, 1930 (Wednesday)Edit

March 13, 1930 (Thursday)Edit

March 14, 1930 (Friday)Edit

  • A committee, by a majority of four to one, endorsed constructing of a tunnel from England to France.[25]

March 15, 1930 (Saturday)Edit

March 16, 1930 (Sunday)Edit

  • Former Spanish dictator Miguel Primo de Rivera was found dead by his son in a Paris hotel room. He had been on his way to the German spa town of Wiesbaden to seek treatment for diabetes.[28]
  • 9 American sailors were wounded in Manila in race riots with Filipinos.[29]
  • Died: Miguel Primo de Rivera, 60, Spanish military officer and dictator

March 17, 1930 (Monday)Edit

March 18, 1930 (Tuesday)Edit

March 19, 1930 (Wednesday)Edit

March 20, 1930 (Thursday)Edit

  • Mahatma Gandhi arrived in Kareli during the Salt March where he instructed villagers to refuse to fetch water for the tax collector as long as he worked for the British government.[36]
  • Born: Willie Thrower, American football player, in New Kensington, Pennsylvania (d. 2002)

March 21, 1930 (Friday)Edit

March 22, 1930 (Saturday)Edit

March 23, 1930 (Sunday)Edit

  • Fascist Italy abolished customs laws dating back to medieval times which had given municipalities the right to levy a tax on farmers entering city gates with their produce.[40]

March 24, 1930 (Monday)Edit

March 25, 1930 (Tuesday)Edit

March 26, 1930 (Wednesday)Edit

March 27, 1930 (Thursday)Edit

  • Hermann Müller resigned as Chancellor of Germany over disagreements with his coalition government on the issue of unemployment insurance for the country's 3 million jobless.[44]

March 28, 1930 (Friday)Edit

  • Turkey officially requested that all countries stop referring to its largest city as Constantinople and call it Istanbul instead.[45]
  • Persia adopted the gold standard.[46]
  • The British government decided to abolish capital punishment for four crimes in the British army: misbehaviour before the enemy in such a manner as to show cowardice, leaving a guard, picket, patrol or post without orders, intentionally sounding a false alarm and leaving a post when acting as a sentinel. The death penalty for mutiny, treason and desertion was maintained.[47]
  • In a speech in Toronto, the Governor General of Canada Viscount Willingdon suggested that Canada take over the British West Indies, explaining that the West Indies had a "feeling of enormous gratitude for the steps taken by Canada following the recent trade agreement" and that they wanted to be "linked directly with Canada."[48]
  • Born: Robert Ashley, composer, in Ann Arbor, Michigan (d. 2014); Jerome Isaac Friedman, physicist and Nobel Laureate, in Chicago, Illinois

March 29, 1930 (Saturday)Edit

  • The French Chamber of Deputies ratified the Young Plan by an overwhelming vote of 530 to 55.[49]

March 30, 1930 (Sunday)Edit

  • Paul von Hindenburg appointed Heinrich Brüning to be the new German chancellor.[50]
  • Australian Prime Minister James Scullin laid out the seriousness of the country's economic problems, including a 13% unemployment rate, at a conference of state premiers in Canberra. "Australia must realize she must export in the next few years as much produce as she can", Scullin said. "This means Australia must do with fewer luxuries and with less of foreign-made goods."[51]
  • Born: John Astin, actor, in Baltimore, Maryland; Rolf Harris, entertainer, in Bassendean, Western Australia

March 31, 1930 (Monday)Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 2, 1930). "German Cabinet Near Fall over Radical Tax Plan". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10.
  2. ^ Wales, Henry (March 2, 1930). "Channel Tunnel Seen as Key to Navy Deadlock". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  3. ^ "Russia Loosens Iron Grip in Peasant Class". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 3, 1930. p. 6.
  4. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 390. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  5. ^ "Tageseinträge für 2. März 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  6. ^ Steele, John (March 5, 1930). "Naval Parley Reopens; Hears Experts' Report". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6.
  7. ^ Steele, John (March 6, 1930). "London Brokers Advide British to Invest in U.S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  8. ^ "Tageseinträge für 6. März 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  9. ^ "Reds Arrested, Many Injured in Petty Riots". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 7, 1930. p. 3.
  10. ^ "First frozen food sold: March 6, 1930". HealthCentral. March 3, 2014. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  11. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 8, 1930). "Schacht Quits Reichsbank Job; Raps Young Plan". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6.
  12. ^ Crawford, Arthur (March 8, 1930). "Hoover Says Industry's Slump Is Nearing End". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  13. ^ Crawford, Arthur (March 9, 1930). "Taft Dead; 30 Day Mourning". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  14. ^ "Liberty or Jail, Mahatma Gandhi Followers Cry". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 9, 1930. p. 4.
  15. ^ "Ruth Signs; Gers $160,000 for Two Years". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 9, 1930. p. 29.
  16. ^ "Tageseinträge für 8. März 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  17. ^ Ziolkowski, Theodore. Scandal on Stage: European Theater as Moral Trial. Cambridge University Press. p. 99. ISBN 978-0-521-11260-4.
  18. ^ "Fire and Panic Kill 105 at War Movie in Corea". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 11, 1930. p. 3.
  19. ^ a b "Ex-Chancellor Luther Is Head Of Reichsbank". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 11, 1930. p. 1.
  20. ^ Crawford, Arthur (March 12, 1930). "Taft Buried in Arlington Cemetery". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  21. ^ "2,000 Youths Fight Police as Gandhi Marches". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 13, 1930. p. 3.
  22. ^ Wales, Henry (March 13, 1930). "Briand Quits; Perils Parley". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  23. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 14, 1930). "Hindenburg Ends Young Plan War by Sweep of Pen". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 9.
  24. ^ Stern, Alan; Tholen, David James, eds. (1997). Pluto and Charon. University of Arizona Press. p. xv. ISBN 978-0-8165-1840-1.
  25. ^ Steele, John (March 15, 1930). "Channel Tunnel, 300 Feet Under Sea, Wins O.K.". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  26. ^ Wales, Henry (March 16, 1930). "Tardieu Arrives for Final Effort to Save Parley". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  27. ^ "President Won't Let Cabinet Quit in Polish Crisis". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 16, 1930. p. 5.
  28. ^ Allen, Jay (March 17, 1930). "Spain's Exiled Dictator Dies in Paris". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  29. ^ Wilkins, Ford (March 17, 1930). "9 U.S. Sailors Hurt in Riots in Philippines". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  30. ^ Lawson, William (March 17, 1930). "Capone Speeds for Chicago". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  31. ^ Harvey, Robert C. (1994). The Art of the Funnies: An Aesthetic History. University Press of Mississippi. p. 124. ISBN 978-0-87805-674-3.
  32. ^ "Tageseinträge für 17. März 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  33. ^ "Senate Votes Censorship on Obscene Books". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 19, 1930. p. 1.
  34. ^ "15,583 British Lose Jobs in a Week; Total, 1,563,800". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 19, 1930. p. 2.
  35. ^ Darrah, David (March 20, 1930). "Pope Opens War of prayer on Godless Russia". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12.
  36. ^ "Gandhi Orders Water Strike on Tax Collectors". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 21, 1930. p. 17.
  37. ^ "Tageseinträge für 21. März 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  38. ^ Steele, John (March 23, 1930). "Balfour Carried to Scotch Grave on Farm Cart". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16.
  39. ^ Knopf, Robert (1999). The Theater and Cinema of Buster Keaton. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. p. 188. ISBN 0-691-00441-2.
  40. ^ Darrah, David (March 24, 1930). "Mussolini Lifts Tax Burden on Italy's Farmer". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12.
  41. ^ Wales, Henry (March 25, 1930). "Italy Proposes 6 Month Recess of Naval Parley". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7.
  42. ^ "Two Big German Ship Lines Form 50 Year Merger". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 26, 1930. p. 6.
  43. ^ "Reports by Labor Show Employment Gains in a Month". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 26, 1930. p. 10.
  44. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 28, 1930). "Jobless Dole Row Wrecks Berlin Cabinet". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  45. ^ "1930: Istanbul, not Constantinople". National Geographic History. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  46. ^ "Chronology 1930". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  47. ^ "British Abolish Death for Four Crimes in Army". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 29, 1930. p. 4.
  48. ^ "Canada Urged to Take British Islands off U.S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 29, 1930. p. 4.
  49. ^ Allen, Jay (March 30, 1930). "French Ratify Young Plan by Huge Majority". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7.
  50. ^ Adam, Thomas (2005). Germany and the Americas: O-Z. ABC-CLIO. pp. 184–185. ISBN 978-1-85109-628-2.
  51. ^ Dailey, Charles (March 31, 1930). "Australia Told 'Do or Die' Spirit is Business Hope". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13.
  52. ^ Doherty, Thomas Patrick. Pre-Code Hollywood: Sex, Immorality, and Insurrection in American Cinema 1930–1934. New York: Columbia University Press 1999; ISBN 0-231-11094-4.