Let's Get to It

Let's Get to It is the fourth studio album by Australian recording artist Kylie Minogue. It was the final studio album with Pete Waterman Limited (PWL), being released by the record label in the United Kingdom on 14 October 1991. Mushroom Records distributed the album in Australia on 25 November 1991. After Matt Aitken left the trio Stock Aitken Waterman (SAW) in early 1991, the remaining producers wanted to make another album with Minogue, although it was not a contractual obligation for her. Mike Stock and Pete Waterman agreed to share their songwriting credits with Minogue for the first time on six tracks. They spent months recording at PWL Studios, more time than any of her previous studio albums.

Let's Get to It
A black-and-white image of Minogue sporting a 1960s-style bouffant and looking away from the camera, with three men partially shown in the background
Studio album by
Released14 October 1991 (1991-10-14)
Recorded1991
StudioPWL
Genre
Length39:04
Label
Producer
Kylie Minogue chronology
Rhythm of Love
(1990)
Let's Get to It
(1991)
Greatest Hits
(1992)
Singles from Let's Get to It
  1. "Word Is Out"
    Released: 28 August 1991
  2. "If You Were with Me Now"
    Released: 21 October 1991
  3. "Give Me Just a Little More Time"
    Released: 13 January 1992
  4. "Finer Feelings"
    Released: 13 April 1992

Musically, Let's Get to It varies in sound, with it including hip hop, new jack swing, house and dance-pop genres. Music critics provided mixed reviews, recognising Minogue's creative control and her provocative image despite them being ambivalent towards the production. The album is one of Minogue's least successful studio albums to date, missing the top 10 in both her native Australia and the UK. Nonetheless, it has since been certified gold in Australia by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA).

Four singles were released from Let's Get to It, including UK top 10 entries "If You Were with Me Now" and "Give Me Just a Little More Time". The other singles, "Word Is Out" and "Finer Feelings", attained top 20 positions in the UK. Minogue further promoted the album with her Let's Get to It Tour, which traveled throughout Europe in October and November 1991. It was re-issued in the UK for the first time in 2015.

BackgroundEdit

In 1990, Minogue released her third studio album Rhythm of Love, reflecting a more sexually liberated image and dance-influenced sound. She became more involved in the album's creation and arrangement than her previous projects alongside being credited as co-writer for the first time, while Stock Aitken Waterman (SAW) were the primary producers.[1][2] Promotion for Rhythm of Love included controversial music videos for "Better the Devil You Know" and "What Do I Have to Do",[3][4] which continued to foster Minogue's increasingly provocative image.[5] Her romantic relationship with Australian rock band INXS's lead singer Michael Hutchence, one of her biggest influences during the production of Rhythm of Love,[2] also generated intense publicity.[6] In early 1991, Hutchence ended their 16-month relationship over the telephone.[7]

After finishing the Rhythm of Love Tour, which spanned through Australia and Asia in February and March 1991, Minogue took a short break and spent time in Paris with her friends.[8][9] Among them was British photographer Katerina Jebb, who later became a frequent collaborator of hers.[9] She dated model Zane O'Connell, who appears in the music videos for "What Do I Have to Do" and "Shocked".[10] During the production of Rhythm of Love, SAW struggled to find an audience for their pop output.[11] They were disappointed by the contemporary trends in music; Mike Stock commented: "We always tried to create pop hooks... By the 1990s, it was made by people who were off the heads on ecstasy. They'd be fascinated just with two notes going backwards and forwards."[11] As a result, Matt Aitken left SAW in 1991 because he felt he was "burnt out".[12] "People say all our records sound the same, but it came to a point where they started sounding all the same to me," he said.[13]

Recording and productionEdit

 
Pete Waterman (pictured), Mike Stock and Minogue wrote and produced Let's Get to It in 1991.

Let's Get to It was not a contractual obligation for Minogue; Pete Waterman Limited (PWL) had signed her initially for three studio albums.[14][15] However, Pete Waterman and PWL co-owner David Howells wanted to make another album with her because of the commercial benefits.[11][15] Stock contacted Minogue while she was in Paris and they both agreed to do it.[11] Over the course of 1991, Minogue left the city and returned to PWL Studios in London with her remaining producers Stock and Waterman.[16] The two agreed to share their songwriting credits with Minogue for the first time; she was listed as a co-writer on six tracks.[17][18] Waterman would provide hints about the content and song titles, while Stock and Minogue put the songs together by humming different melodies and recording them within a day.[19] She spent months working on Let's Get to It, more time than any of Minogue's earlier works.[20]

During the production, club music and the London club scene fascinated Minogue. Although her music had always been played in commercial clubs, the pop element of her earlier works made the exclusive clubs look down on her.[15][21] "If you go into Bowlers or you go into the Haçienda, you can't play 'I Should Be So Lucky' can you? They're going to lynch you!", Waterman said.[22] To give herself more credibility with clubs, Minogue created an alias for herself as "Angel K" and released several white label promotional vinyls. The tracks released included "Do You Dare" and "Closer", which later appeared as B-sides on the singles "Give Me Just a Little More Time" and "Finer Feelings", respectively.[15][21] Waterman also wanted to produce more "cutting edge dance music" for Minogue to fit in his show The Hitman and Her, which he considered a trendy show back then.[22] Minogue suggested she hoped to find time for more recording in 1991, telling Smash Hits in August that she "may do some more writing in America which may lead to another recording there", but the recordings never materialised.[23]

Waterman and PWL imported songs for Let's Get to It recorded by foreign acts like 2 Unlimited whose song, "Get Ready for This" (1991), is sampled heavily on "I Guess I Like It Like That".[12] Their intention was to buy these songs cheaply and make a profit from them. Stock felt uninspired by this and the mostly sample-based album, saying: "There's no point having an artist like [Minogue] or a writer like me there if the rule is [buying] cheap from abroad."[11] He composed "Finer Feelings" with Waterman, as Minogue wanted to put more sexual content on the album.[14] Minogue and American singer Keith Washington wrote and recorded the duet "If You Were with Me Now" separately. It was her first duet on any of her albums; "Especially for You" was recorded previously for Jason Donovan's Ten Good Reasons (1989).[24][25] One of the last tracks to be recorded for Let's Get to It was the cover of Chairmen of the Board's "Give Me Just a Little More Time" (1970).[26]

Music and lyricsEdit

 
American R&B vocalist Keith Washington co-wrote his duet with Minogue, "If You Were with Me Now"

Minogue stated her songs on Let's Get to It are quite different than her previous work, ranging from "big band swing stuff to a more soulful kind of thing", and "more mature dance music".[27] Digital Spy's Nick Levine called the album her most "diverse set of songs yet", with "no shortage of dance-poppy" moments.[28] Sal Cinquemani of Slant Magazine noted the sounds of hip hop, new jack swing, and house are featured prominently on Let's Get to It.[29] In Social Theory in Popular Culture, Lee Barron noted the significant musical differences from the "initial formula" of Minogue's early works, with "a sound even flirting with R&B influences",[30] while Chris True of AllMusic found the songs have "heavy breathing effects" and are "certainly as danceable as Rhythm of Love".[31] Joe Sweeney of PopMatters highlighted the takes on "new jack swing, Disney duet balladry and Jock Jams".[32] Nathan Wood of Foxtel's MaxTV called the album "a musical exploration". He felt Minogue's fondness for dance music emerged on Let's Get to It, with "forays into house and techno, as well as R&B; and swing".[33] Nick Griffiths of Select noted Minogue's previous teen pop material had been "superseded by a glossier, more soulful production".[34]

Let's Get to It opens with "Word Is Out", a new jack swing track with elements of jazz fusion.[28][35] Minogue duplicated General Johnson's trademark vocal style on her cover of "Give Me Just a Little More Time".[32] Levine found the track perky,[28] while Sweeney noted she puts more of her own personality into it than previous cover songs like "The Loco-Motion" or "Tears on My Pillow".[32] The house track "Too Much of a Good Thing" is followed by "Finer Feelings", a song that includes a reference to Marvin Gaye's "Sexual Healing" (1982) in the chorus with the lyrics: "What is love without the finer feelings / It's just sex without the sexual healing."[28][36] Levine felt that the lyrics show a "sexier and more sophisticated" side of Minogue.[28] "If You Were with Me Now", Minogue's duet with Washington, is a non-sexual and string-drenched sentimental ballad.[37]

Minogue urges her lover to "get this thing on the move" in the title track, written by Stock and Waterman.[38] "Right Here, Right Now", a house floor-filler track, follows it.[28] Sweeney found the song has a similar groove vibe to the work of CeCe Peniston, while the title is the same as that of the 1990 song by British rock band Jesus Jones.[32] It is entirely unrelated to the song of the same name that Minogue recorded with Italian producer Giorgio Moroder in 2015.[39] Minogue sings about living life to the fullest in "Live and Learn", followed by the acoustic ballad "No World Without You".[38][28] The six-minute techno-pop "I Guess I Like It Like That",[28] which serves as the album's closer, includes a stadium keyboard part that lays the foundation of the song.[31] The song contains a sample from 2 Unlimited's "Get Ready for This",[14] and an uncredited interpolation of "I Like It Like That" (1988) by Salt-N-Pepa.[40] Belgian producers Phil Wilde and Jean-Paul de Coster, who wrote and produced "Get Ready for This", were only credited as co-authors of "I Guess I Like It Like That" on the 2012 re-release of Let's Get to It in Japan.[41]

Artwork and releaseEdit

 
German fashion photographer Jürgen Teller shot the album cover.

German fashion photographer Jürgen Teller produced the artwork for Let's Get to It.[42] On the black-and-white cover, Minogue sports a 1960s-style bouffant and looks away from the camera, with three men partially shown in the background.[43] She wears a sleeveless minidress that was designed by Nobuhiko Kitamura for Japanese fashion brand Hysteric Glamour.[44] The minidress is a stretch lycra piece with multi-coloured vanity print and has shoestring shoulder straps of the same fabric.[44] Minogue found the cover interesting, saying it "will worry fans the most [with the] weird expression on my face".[19] Oliver Hurley of Classic Pop felt that Minogue looked moody and the artwork was "a striking contrast to the grinning popstrel" of her previous image.[14] Writing for Idolator, Mike Wass complimented the cover as "hip and edgy", and commented that "[Minogue] was entering her cool phase."[45] True commented that the sinister cover, and the title, helped Minogue transform fully "from her innocent dance-pop image to what the press dubbed 'SexKylie'", and described her as a "self-made sex kitten".[31] In 2004, Minogue donated the dress worn for the cover shot to the Cultural Gifts Program of the Arts Centre Melbourne.[44]

Minogue named the album Let's Get to It; she first revealed the title on 31 August 1991 while she was performing "Word is Out" on the children's television series Motormouth.[46] It was her final studio album under PWL released in the UK on 14 October 1991.[38] Mushroom Records released the album in Australia on 25 November 1991.[47] In Japan, it was first released on 21 November 1991 by PWL under the title of あなたもM? (Are you M too?), with instrumental bonus tracks.[48][49] WEA re-released it twice Let's Get to It in 1993 and 1995, respectively,[50] and PWL reissued it in 2012 with bonus tracks and mixes.[41] In October 2014, it was announced Let's Get to It, along with Minogue's studio albums Kylie (1988), Enjoy Yourself (1989), and Rhythm of Love, was to be re-released by Cherry Red Records and PWL.[51][52] The original release date of 27 October 2014 was later postponed to 9 February 2015.[51][53] The albums were digitally remastered from the original studio tapes and were made available on vinyl, CD, and DVD. This was the first time these albums had been re-released in the UK.[52][53]

Minogue's VHS release Let's Get To...The Videos included music videos from Rhythm of Love and Let's Get to It, as well as exclusive behind-the-scenes footage.[54] It was released in 1991 by Mushroom Records in Australia,[55] and by PWL in the UK and Japan.[56] Kylie's Remixes: Vol. 2, an eleven-track compilation of remixed songs from Rhythm of Love and Let's Get to It, was released across Japan in July 1992.[57] It peaked at number 90 on the Oricon Albums Chart and had sold 7,330 copies by 2006.[58][59] The compilation album was later released in Australia in 1993.[60]

PromotionEdit

 
The final show of the Let's Get to It Tour at the Point Theatre, Dublin (pictured) on 8 November 1991 was recorded and released on video albums in 1991 and 2011.

To promote Let's Get to It, Minogue visited Europe with the Let's Get to It Tour in October and November 1991.[61] The tour was an updated version of her Rhythm of Love Tour, featuring a new stage wardrobe curated by fashion designer John Galliano.[62] The costumes included a plastic raincoat,[63] a black fishnet costume with garter,[64] a black evening dress, pointy bras, and tight black shorts.[65] The choreography was more suggestive: Minogue danced, rubbed her cleavage in her chief choreographer Venol King, and pinned him to the floor.[66] The tracklist contains a performance of "Shocked", featuring rapper Jazzi P.[66] Like the Rhythm of Love Tour, Minogue received criticism of provocative nature for the Let's Get to It Tour, which was decried as "pornographic", and received comparisons to Madonna's Who's That Girl World Tour (1987).[67] The British press was fascinated with Minogue's provocative image and dubbed her "SexKylie".[68] EMI released the video album Live! internationally in 1992, which included footage shot during the last show of the Let's Get to It Tour at the Point Theatre, Dublin on 8 November 1991.[61][69] Mushroom Records distributed the video album in Australia under the title Live in Dublin.[70] In 2011, Immortal Records released other footage from the same night, also titled Live in Dublin, in Europe.[71]

SinglesEdit

"Word Is Out" was released as Let's Get to It's lead single in August 1991, with "Say the Word - I'll Be There" as the B-side track, which she had recorded in May of that year.[72] The single was available as a limited edition 12" Summer Breeze mix,[72] which "radically remixed" and reduced "the synthesised band sound" from the original version.[36] Mushroom Records released the remix in Australia, featuring Minogue's autograph on the B-side of the disc.[36][72] Filmed at Camden Lock, James Lebon directed the music video for "Word is Out".[72][73] It features English TV presenter Davina McCall,[28][72] and Minogue is seen seductively dancing in stockings and suspenders on the streets.[36] Her accompanying TV promotion followed the same sexual theme.[36] "Word Is Out" peaked at number 16 on the UK Singles Chart, becoming Minogue's first single to not reach the top 10 and this broke her run of 13 consecutive top 10 singles.[17][74] However, it reached number 10 in Australia, and number eight in Ireland.[75][76]

The album's second single "If You Were with Me Now", a duet by Minogue and Washington, was released in October 1991.[25] A music video, directed by Greg Masuak, accompanied it.[77] Minogue and Washington met briefly on the set for the first time before the video was shot. Masuak opted not to feature any shots of Minogue and Washington together.[24][25] "If You Were with Me Now" reached number four in the UK,[74] becoming Minogue's first co-written top five hit and Washington's last top 40 appearance there.[24][25] It also peaked at number seven in Ireland, and number 23 in Australia.[75][76] "Give Me Just a Little More Time" was released as the third single in January 1992, being accompanied by a music video directed by Masuak.[26][78] It peaked at number two on the UK Singles Chart, standing as the highest-charting single from Let's Get to It.[74] The song also reached the top 20 in Ireland and Belgium.[76][79] The 12" single was released with the B-side "Do You Dare".[15][26] "Finer Feelings" was originally planned as the second single, but "If You Were with Me Now" replaced it.[80] Brothers in Rhythm ultimately released the song in April 1992 as a 12" remix. They later became collaborators of Minogue's throughout the 1990s.[80][81] The remix is nearly seven-minutes long, and later became the 7" radio version as well.[81] "Closer" was also released as the B-side single.[15][21] The single peaked in the top 20 of the UK and Ireland.[74][76] An accompanying black-and-white music video, directed by Dave Hogan, was shot entirely in Paris.[80][82]

Critical receptionEdit

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic     [31]
Digital Spy     [28]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music     [83]
PopMatters          [32]
Select     [34]
Smash Hits          [84]

Let's Get to It was met with mixed reviews from music critics. True praised Minogue for "[showing] potential" by co-writing most of the album and taking more control of her career. However, he felt the album "seems to try too hard" and is "not her most solid release".[31] Griffiths hailed it as "easily her best album" because of the improved production, but still viewed the album as a "false tease" rather than "full-fledged sex", admitting Minogue's music "is still for virgins, even if they now read The Face".[34] In a review of the 2015 reissue of Let's Get to It, Sweeney said that despite Minogue's "confident" songwriting contributions, the album sounds "awkward" and "more dated by half than Rhythm of Love".[32] A writer from Classic Pop magazine ranked it as the eighth-best Stock Aitken Waterman album, deeming it as "an uneasy statement" by Minogue and complimented the dance-oriented track "I Guess I Like It Like That".[85]

A writer from Australian programme Rage felt Minogue sounded mature on Let's Get to It and had been successful in showcasing "a far more seductive side... that many had suspected was there". The programme was also keen on the inclusion of "richly beautiful ballads" like "If You Were With Me Now".[15] Wood highlighted "I Guess I Like it Like That" as a signal of her transformation "from a pop princess to an artist with diverse, genre-pushing tastes, [that] paved the way for her extensive exploration into the world of dance music that would come later".[33] Hurley was less impressed with the album's "ill-advised" R&B influence, saying that Aitken's absence "was noticeable" and the result was "all over the place".[86] Echoing the same sentiments in Smash Hits, Mark Andrews criticised the "dreary", "sloppy" and "instantly forgettable" material.[84]

In the biography Kylie: Naked (2012), Nigel Goodall and Jenny Stanley-Clarke recognized Minogue's writing contribution to Let's Get to It, calling it "the first of her albums to have a personal feel, with influences from her own tastes in music".[36] Levine commented that although the album is a "thoroughly satisfying listen", it "lacks a moment of pure pop brilliance" to match Minogue's earlier works and requires a "few plays to reveal its charms".[28] In 2018, Cinquemani wrote that none of the musical genres featured on the album were "particularly successful", and compared SAW-produced tracks unfavorably to "the distinctly American sound" of Clivillés and Cole, Jam and Lewis, and Full Force. He ranked it as Minogue's third-worst studio album.[29] The album was Minogue's only studio album, apart from her 1994 self-titled album, to receive a two-star rating from British writer Colin Larkin in the Encyclopedia of Popular Music (2011), who classified it as "disappointing", "week or dull and not recommended".[83]

Despite the mixed critical reception, Minogue received a nomination for Best Female Artist at the ARIA Music Awards of 1992 as a result of her work on Let's Get to It.[87] It was her third nomination in the category, following nominations for Kylie in 1989 and Enjoy Yourself in 1990.[88][89] Minogue lost the award to Australian singer-songwriter Deborah Conway for her album String of Pearls (1992).[87]

Commercial performance and aftermathEdit

Let's Get to It is among Minogue's least successful albums to date.[33] It debuted and peaked at number 15 on the UK Albums Chart after initially being released, becoming her first studio album to not reach the top 10.[14][90] In January 1992, the album re-entered at number 68 for one week.[91] When "Give Me Just a Little More Time" reached its peak at number two on the UK Singles Chart, Let's Get to It returned to the UK Albums Chart at number 50.[92][93] The album lasted for a total of 12 weeks on the chart, the shortest run by a Minogue studio album at the time.[74] In her native Australia, it peaked at number 13 and spent only five weeks on the chart.[94] Nevertheless, Let's Get to It was certified gold by Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) for selling 35,000 copies in the country in March 1992.[95][96] Let's Get to It peaked at number 37 on the Oricon Albums Chart, becoming Minogue's third consecutive top 40 entry in Japan.[48] It remained on the chart for three weeks, and has sold 25,350 copies as of 2006.[48][59] On the European Top 100 Albums, a chart compiled by Music & Media, it peaked at number 59 on the week of 9 November 1991.[97]

Minogue was disappointed with the output, feeling that SAW had reverted to "formulaic tunes" and by the time Let's Get to It came, "the magic [had] gone and the record sank quickly".[98] Besides from work commitments, she spent much of 1992 being away from the public.[99] By the end of 1992, PWL did not renew the contract with Minogue, who felt the singer "was [not] moving in a direction that was going to be successful", according to PWL co-owner David Howells.[100] Following her release after four years, Minogue stated that she felt stifled by SAW, saying "I wanted to break free of the chains binding me. I was tired of being the SAW popstrel."[101] In an interview with Q that year, Minogue said: "I was very much a puppet in the beginning. I was blinkered by my record company. I was unable to look left or right".[102] Minogue's final release under PWL was Greatest Hits (1992).[14]

In retrospect reviews, music critics viewed Let's Get to It as a clear statement for Minogue's departure from PWL.[29] True felt their musical relationship had become "restrictive" as the music scene "was beginning to move on" from the SAW familiar pop sound.[103] Hurley stated that the album was part of Minogue's crucial transition and signaled that the singer "was ready to move on".[14] The lack of interest to Let's Get to It was also discussed, which pointed towards the "SexKylie" image and the change in musical direction.[36] "The public saw [Minogue] dressed as a prostitute, and they wouldn't accept it," said Waterman.[36] Minogue, on the other hand, was flattered that the image gave her a new audience.[68] In a 2015 interview, Waterman said that he already knew Let's Get to It was Minogue's final studio album with SAW during the making of it, saying Minogue "was overshadowing us and killing our creativity... we should have actually sold that album before we made it."[22]

Track listingEdit

All songs produced by Mike Stock and Pete Waterman.

Let's Get to It – Standard version[38]
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Word Is Out"3:35
2."Give Me Just a Little More Time"3:08
3."Too Much of a Good Thing"
4:24
4."Finer Feelings"
  • Stock
  • Waterman
3:54
5."If You Were with Me Now" (duet with Keith Washington)
3:11
6."Let's Get to It"
  • Stock
  • Waterman
4:49
7."Right Here, Right Now"
  • Minogue
  • Stock
  • Waterman
3:52
8."Live and Learn"
  • Minogue
  • Stock
  • Waterman
3:15
9."No World Without You"
  • Minogue
  • Stock
  • Waterman
2:46
10."I Guess I Like It Like That"
  • Minogue
  • Stock
  • Waterman
  • Phil Wilde
  • Jean-Paul de Coster
6:00
Total length:39:04
Let's Get to It – 1991 Japanese bonus 3" CD[49]
No.TitleLength
1."Word Is Out" (Instrumental)3:31
2."What Do I Have to Do" (Instrumental)3:48
3."Step Back in Time" (Instrumental)3:30
Let's Get to It – 2012 Japanese reissue bonus tracks[41]
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
11."Do You Dare?" (NRG Edit)
  • Minogue
  • Stock
  • Waterman
3:21
12."Closer" (Pleasure Mix)
  • Minogue
  • Stock
  • Waterman
6:48
13."Say the Word - I'll Be There"
  • Minogue
  • Stock
  • Waterman
4:12
14."Word Is Out" (Summer Breeze 12" Mix) 7:44
15."If You Were With Me Now" (Extended) 5:09
16."Give Me Just a Little More Time" (Extended) 4:34
17."Finer Feelings" (Brothers in Rhythm 12") 6:48
Let's Get to It – 2015 reissue deluxe version (Disc 1)[53]
No.TitleLength
11."Say the Word - I'll Be There"4:13
12."Do You Dare?" (NRG Edit)3:21
13."Closer" (Edit)3:57
14."Keep On Pumpin' It" (Angelic Remix Edit)4:02
15."Word Is Out" (Extended Version)5:52
16."If You Were With Me Now" (Extended Version)5:10
17."Give Me Just a Little More Time" (Extended Version)4:35
18."Finer Feelings" (Brothers in Rhythm 12" Mix)6:49
Let's Get to It – 2015 reissue deluxe version (Disc 2)[53]
No.TitleLength
1."Keep on Pumpin' It" (Angelic Remix)7:26
2."Do You Dare?" (NRG Mix)7:05
3."Closer" (The Pleasure Mix)6:48
4."Word Is Out" (Summer Breeze Mix)7:45
5."Too Much of a Good Thing" (Original 12" Mix)5:50
6."Let's Get to It" (Tony King 12" Mix)6:00
7."Right Here, Right Now" (Tony King 12" Mix)7:57
8."Live and Learn" (Original 12" Mix)5:58
9."Keep on Pumpin' It" (Astral Flight Mix)6:55
10."Do You Dare?" (New Rave Mix)6:40
11."No World Without You" (Original Mix)2:54
12."If You Were With Me Now" (Orchestral Mix)3:12
13."Finer Feelings" (Brothers in Rhythm Dub)4:09
Let's Get to It – 2015 reissue deluxe version (Disc 3)[53]
No.TitleLength
1."Word Is Out" (Music video) 
2."If You Were With Me Now" (Music video) 
3."Give Me Just a Little More Time" (Music video) 
4."Finer Feelings" (Music video) 
5."What Kind of Fool (Heard All That Before)" (Music video) 
6."Celebration" (Music video) 
7."Word Is Out" (Australian version, part of the bonus footage section) 
8."Thank Yous" (Part of the bonus footage section) 
9."Word Is Out" (Live on Wogan) 
10."Word Is Out" (Live on Top of the Pops) 
11."Give Me Just a Little More Time" (Live on Going Live!) 
12."Finer Feelings" (Live on Top of the Pops) 
13."What Kind of Fool (Heard All That Before)" (Live on Top of the Pops) 
14."Celebration" (Live on Top of the Pops) 
15."Celebration" (Live at the Smash Hits Poll Winner's Party) 
Let's Get To...The Videos – VHS version[54]
No.TitleLength
1."Better the Devil You Know" (music video) 
2."Step Back in Time" (music video) 
3."What Do I Have to Do" (music video) 
4."Shocked" (music video) 
5."Word Is Out" (music video) 
6."If You Were with Me Now" (music video) 
7."Behind the scenes" 
Kylie's Remixes: Vol. 2[57]
No.TitleLength
1."Better the Devil You Know" (U.S. remix)6:03
2."Step Back in Time" (Walkin' Rhythm mix)7:55
3."What Do I Have to Do" (Between the Sheets remix)7:10
4."Shocked" (DNA 12" mix)6:16
5."Word Is Out" (12" version)5:53
6."If You Were with Me Now" (Extended version, with Keith Washington)5:11
7."Keep on Pumpin' It" (Angelic Remix)7:25
8."Give Me Just a Little More Time" (12" version)4:36
9."Finer Feelings" (Brothers in Rhythm 12" mix)6:51
10."Do You Dare?" (NRG mix)7:06
11."Closer" (The Pleasure mix)6:49
Notes
  • The Summer Breeze 7" edit of "Word Is Out" was used for the Australian release.[36]
  • "I Guess I like Like That" samples 2 Unlimited's "Get Ready For This" (1991) and contains an uncredited interpolation of Salt-N-Pepa's "I Like It Like That" (1988).[14][40] Belgian producers Phil Wilde and Jean-Paul de Coster, who wrote and produced "Get Ready for This", were only credited as co-authors in the 2012 re-release in Japan.[41]

PersonnelEdit

Adapted from the album's liner notes.[38]

ChartsEdit

Chart performance for Let's Get to It in 1991
Charts (1991) Peak
position
Australian Albums (ARIA)[94] 13
European Albums (Music & Media)[97] 59
Japanese Albums (Oricon)[48] 37
UK Albums (OCC)[90] 15

Certifications and salesEdit

Certifications and sales for Let's Get to It
Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[95] Gold 35,000^
Japan 25,350[59]

^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

Release historyEdit

Release dates and formats for Let's Get to It
Region Date Format(s) Label(s) Ref(s).
United Kingdom 14 October 1991 PWL [38]
Australia 25 November 1991 Mushroom Records [47]
Japan 21 November 1991 PWL [49][48]
10 July 1993 CD WEA [104]
25 April 1995 [105]
Australia 29 September 1998 Mushroom Records [106]
Japan 7 November 2012 PWL [41]
United Kingdom 9 February 2015
[51][53]
Japan [107]

ReferencesEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Macias, Ernest (1 February 2018). "Your guide to Kylie Minogue's disco-pop music career". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on 14 August 2019. Retrieved 13 April 2018.
  2. ^ a b Soutar 1990
  3. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 69
  4. ^ "Singles: What Do I Have to Do". Kylie.com. Archived from the original on 4 February 2008. Retrieved 3 December 2007.
  5. ^ Smash Hits 1990; Smith 2014, pp. 91–92
  6. ^ Smith 2014, pp. 91–92; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 66
  7. ^ Smith 2014, p. 100; Flynn 2019, p. 32: "Non-Stop Dancing" by Hurley, Oliver
  8. ^ "Rhythm of Love Tour 1991". Kylie.com. Archived from the original on 19 October 2007. Retrieved 19 October 2017.
  9. ^ a b Smith 2014, p. 101
  10. ^ Smith 2014, p. 106; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 74
  11. ^ a b c d e Flynn 2019, p. 29: "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  12. ^ a b Flynn 2019, p. 31: "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  13. ^ Petridis, Alexis (3 December 2005). "Return of the hitmen". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 15 May 2019. Retrieved 10 September 2016.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h Flynn 2019, p. 32: "Non-Stop Dancing" by Hurley, Oliver
  15. ^ a b c d e f g "Rage: Kylie Minogue Special". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 3 August 2002. Archived from the original on 7 January 2006. Retrieved 15 September 2015.
  16. ^ PWL 1991d; Smith 2014, p. 102
  17. ^ a b Smith 2014, p. 103
  18. ^ "Albums: Let's Get to It". Kylie.com. Archived from the original on 12 October 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2007.
  19. ^ a b Big! 1991
  20. ^ Bigsby, Hill & Dale 1991: [Minogue]: "... I spent a few months on this album, which is the most time I've spent on any album, which is really nice."
  21. ^ a b c Smith 2014, p. 104
  22. ^ a b c Fat Gay Vegan (9 February 2015). "Interview: Pete Waterman – with Kylie's first four albums getting the deluxe reissue treatment we talk to the producer behind them". Louder than War. Archived from the original on 10 September 2018. Retrieved 10 September 2020.
  23. ^ Doyle 1991
  24. ^ a b c Flynn 2019, p. 102: "Wash and Go" by Earls, John
  25. ^ a b c d "Singles: If You Were With Me Now". Kylie.com. Archived from the original on 12 October 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2007.
  26. ^ a b c "Singles: Give Me Just a Little More Time". Kylie.com. Archived from the original on 15 April 2012. Retrieved 3 December 2007.
  27. ^ Big! 1991; Doyle 1991
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Levine, Nick (22 May 2010). Copsey, Robert (ed.). "Kylie: Revisited #4: 'Let's Get To It'". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on 12 December 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2015.
  29. ^ a b c Cinquemani, Sal (5 April 2018). "Disco Down Under: Every Kylie Minogue Album Ranked". Slant Magazine. Archived from the original on 28 March 2019. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  30. ^ Barron 2012, p. 65
  31. ^ a b c d e True, Chris. "Let's Get to It – Kylie Minogue". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 3 April 2016. Retrieved 12 September 2015.
  32. ^ a b c d e f Sweeney, Joe (8 April 2015). "Kylie Minogue: Kylie / Enjoy Yourself / Rhythm of Love / Let's Get to It". PopMatters. Archived from the original on 12 April 2019. Retrieved 8 April 2015.
  33. ^ a b c Wood, Nathan (2014). "Kylie Minogue to Reissue First Four Albums". MaxTV. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 14 September 2015.
  34. ^ a b c Griffiths 1991
  35. ^ Eggar 1991
  36. ^ a b c d e f g h i Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 76
  37. ^ PWL 1991d; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 76
  38. ^ a b c d e f PWL 1991d
  39. ^ Hamard, Jonathan (2 February 2015). "Clip de 'Right Here, Right Now' : Kylie Minogue devient la muse de Giorgio Moroder (màj)" [Clip of 'Right Here, Right Now': Kylie Minogue becomes the muse of Giorgio Moroder (update)]. PureBreak Charts (in French). Archived from the original on 12 September 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  40. ^ a b Smith, Carl; Simms, Steve (28 May 2018). "Kylie Minogue's 15 most underrated tracks ever". Heatworld. Archived from the original on 20 October 2020. Retrieved 28 May 2018.
  41. ^ a b c d e PWL 2012
  42. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 32: "Non-Stop Dancing" by Hurley, Oliver; PWL 1991d
  43. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 32: "Non-Stop Dancing" by Hurley, Oliver; Big! 1991
  44. ^ a b c "Dress worn by Kylie Minogue in photographic shoot, 'Lets Get To It' album cover, 1991". Arts Centre Melbourne. Archived from the original on 7 September 2020. Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  45. ^ Wass, Mike; Daw, Robbie (24 January 2014). "Some Thoughts on Kylie Minogue's Exquisite Album Covers: Big Hair, Sex Appeal & That Gold Hat – Let's Get to It". Idolator (Photo gallery). Archived from the original on 13 November 2020. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  46. ^ Bigsby, Hill & Dale 1991: [Interviewer]: Is it titled? / [Minogue]: "Well, as of today, I decided this morning..." / [Interviewer]: "Oh, exclusive!" / [Minogue]: "...It's called Let's Get to It."
  47. ^ a b "New Release Summary > Product Available from 25 November 1991". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 1 October 2020. Retrieved 26 November 2019 – via Imgur.
  48. ^ a b c d e 「あなたもM?」 カイリー・ミノーグ [Are you M too? – Kylie Minogue] (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on 7 April 2014. Retrieved 7 April 2014.
  49. ^ a b c PWL 1991c
  50. ^ WEA 1993; WEA 1995
  51. ^ a b c "Kylie Minogue Reissue Campaign Announcement". PWL Records. 20 October 2014. Archived from the original on 6 April 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  52. ^ a b "First Four Kylie Minogue Albums Re-released". Classic Pop. August 2014. Archived from the original on 1 July 2019. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  53. ^ a b c d e f PWL & Cherry Red 2015a
  54. ^ a b PWL 1991a
  55. ^ "New Release Summary > Product Available from 16 December 1991". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 6 October 2020. Retrieved 26 November 2019 – via Imgur.
  56. ^ PWL 1991a; PWL 1991b
  57. ^ a b ALFA 1992
  58. ^ カイリーズ・リミクシーズVol.2 [Kylie's Remixes Vol.2 – Kylie Minogue] (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on 22 December 2013. Retrieved 22 December 2013.
  59. ^ a b c Okamoto 2006
  60. ^ Mushroom 1993
  61. ^ a b "Let's Get to It Tour 1991". Kylie.com. Archived from the original on 19 October 2007. Retrieved 11 September 2015.
  62. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 75
  63. ^ Adickman, Erika Brooks (25 May 2012). "Happy Birthday, Kylie Minogue! We Celebrate Her Sexy Style Evolution: Kylie Minogue Let's Get To It Tour 1991". Idolator (Photo gallery). Archived from the original on 7 October 2020. Retrieved 2 October 2016.
  64. ^ O'Keefe, Meghan (15 April 2013). "Kylie Minogue's 10 Most Butt-iful Moments". VH1. Archived from the original on 13 December 2019. Retrieved 2 October 2016.
  65. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 75; Flynn 2019, p. 106: "Lose It in the Music" by Guiltenane, Christian
  66. ^ a b Flynn 2019, p. 106: "Lose It in the Music" by Guiltenane, Christian
  67. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 106: "Lose It in the Music" by Guiltenane, Christian; Flynn 2019, p. 106: "Lose It in the Music" by Guiltenane, Christian
  68. ^ a b Bernstein 1995
  69. ^ EMI 1992
  70. ^ Mushroom 1992
  71. ^ Immortal 2011
  72. ^ a b c d e "Singles: Word Is Out". Kylie.com. Archived from the original on 12 October 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2007.
  73. ^ PWL 1991a, "Word is Out"
  74. ^ a b c d e "Kylie Minogue – Official Chart History". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 15 April 2019. Retrieved 15 April 2019.
  75. ^ a b "Kylie Minogue Discography". Australian-charts.com. Archived from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  76. ^ a b c d "Kylie Minogue Discography". Irish Recorded Music Association. Archived from the original on 20 August 2019. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  77. ^ PWL 1991a, "If You Were with Me Now"
  78. ^ Mushroom & Roadshow 1998, "Give Me Just a Little More Time"
  79. ^ "Ultratop.be – Kylie Minogue – Give Me Just a Little More Time" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Archived from the original on 29 September 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2016.
  80. ^ a b c "Singles: Finer Feelings". Kylie.com. Archived from the original on 12 October 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2007.
  81. ^ a b Smith 2014, p. 111
  82. ^ Mushroom & Roadshow 1998, "Finer Feelings"
  83. ^ a b Larkin 2011, pp. 3435–3437, "Kylie Minogue"
  84. ^ a b Andrews 1991
  85. ^ Elliot, Mark (July 2018). "Top 15 Stock Aitken Waterman Albums". Classic Pop. Archived from the original on 10 August 2019. Retrieved 10 August 2019.
  86. ^ Flynn 2019, pp. 32, 37: "Non-Stop Dancing" by Hurley, Oliver
  87. ^ a b "Winners by Year – 1992 ARIA Music Awards". ARIA Music Awards. Archived from the original on 27 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  88. ^ "Winners by Year – 1989 ARIA Music Awards". ARIA Music Awards. Archived from the original on 27 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  89. ^ "Winners by Year – 1990 ARIA Music Awards". ARIA Music Awards. Archived from the original on 27 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  90. ^ a b "Official Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  91. ^ "Official Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. 5 January 1992. Archived from the original on 25 March 2019. Retrieved 7 October 2020.
  92. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 75". Official Charts Company. 26 January 1992. Archived from the original on 14 April 2019. Retrieved 7 October 2020.
  93. ^ "Official Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. 26 January 1992. Archived from the original on 20 February 2018. Retrieved 7 October 2020.
  94. ^ a b "Australiancharts.com – Kylie Minogue – Let's Get to It". Hung Medien. Retrieved 19 September 2015.
  95. ^ a b "Kylie Minogue Albums Chart History". Australian Recording Industry Association. 16 July 2018. Archived from the original on 11 October 2019. Retrieved 16 July 2018 – via Imgur. The High Point number in the NAT column displays the release's peak on the national chart.
  96. ^ "The Australian Top 100 Albums Chart". The ARIA Report. 29 March 1992. Archived from the original on 7 October 2020. Retrieved 7 October 2020 – via Imgur.
  97. ^ a b Music & Media 1991
  98. ^ Baker & Minogue 2002
  99. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 77
  100. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 78; Flynn 2019, p. 31: "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  101. ^ Sullivan 1994
  102. ^ "How does Kylie Minogue look back on her musical evolution?". BBC. 2018. Archived from the original on 17 October 2019. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  103. ^ True, Chris. "Kylie Minogue – Biography & History". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 26 August 2019. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  104. ^ WEA 1993
  105. ^ WEA 1995
  106. ^ Mushroom 1991
  107. ^ PWL & Cherry Red 2015b

Media notesEdit

  • Greatest Video Hits (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Australia: Mushroom / Roadshow. 1998. ASIN B000059GIM. MUSH81007.8. Archived from the original on 8 October 2020 – via AllMusic.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie's Remixes 2 (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: ALFA. 1992. ASIN B000005RL0. ALCB-564. Archived from the original on 22 July 2020 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie's Remixes, Vol.2 (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Australia: Mushroom. 1993. D19757. Archived from the original on 20 September 2017. Retrieved 1 July 2019 – via AllMusic.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Let's Get To...The Videos (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. United Kingdom: PWL. 1991. ASIN B00008T4H9. VHF21. Archived from the original on 30 September 2012 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Let's Get To...The Videos (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: PWL. 1991. ALLB-19. Archived from the original on 20 March 2005 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Let's Get to It (Liner notes). Kylie Minogue. United Kingdom: PWL. 1991. ASIN B000057LKJ. HFCD21. Archived from the original on 6 April 2016 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Let's Get to It (Media notes). Kylie Minogue (Collector's ed.). UK & Europe: PWL / Cherry Red. 2015. ASIN B00MR2NNMG. KYLIE 4 T. Archived from the original on 1 July 2019. Retrieved 1 July 2019.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Let's Get to It (Media notes). Kylie Minogue (Collector's ed.). Japan: PWL /Cherry Red. 2015. ASIN B00MR2NMNG. KYLIE 4. Archived from the original on 1 July 2019. Retrieved 1 July 2019.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Let's Get to It (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Australia: Mushroom. 1991. ASIN B00MR2NOJ8. MUSH32216.2.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Live! (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. United Kingdom: EMI. 1992. ASIN B00004RZU4. MVN9913473. Archived from the original on 17 May 2005 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Live in Dublin (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Australia: Mushroom. 1992. V82459. Archived from the original on 6 October 2020 – via Trove.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Live in Dublin (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Europe: Immortal. 2011. ASIN B00505E4VQ. IMM940240. Archived from the original on 6 October 2020 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • あなたもM? (Liner notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: PWL. 1991. ASIN B000024550. ALCB-406. Archived from the original on 16 June 2016 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • あなたもM? (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: WEA. 1993. ASIN B00000727V. WMC5-624.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • あなたもM? (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: WEA. 1995. ASIN B00005HG1E. WPCR-312.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • あなたもM? (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: PWL. 2012. ASIN B00006O9RA. TOCP-71443. Archived from the original on 7 October 2020 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Bigsby, Nick (director); Hill, Vanessa (producer); Dale, John (writer) (31 August 1991). "Episode #4.1". Motormouth. Season 4. United Kingdom. ITV.

Print sourcesEdit

External linksEdit