Kylie (album)

  (Redirected from Kylie's Remixes)

Kylie is the debut studio album by Australian recording artist Kylie Minogue, released on 4 July 1988 by Mushroom Records. Minogue had established herself as a child actress before signing to the record label in early 1987. The success of her debut single, "Locomotion", resulted in her working with Stock, Aitken and Waterman, who produced the album and wrote nine of its ten tracks. Their recording sessions, which started in September 1987 and took place in London and Melbourne, coincided with Minogue filming for the soap opera Neighbours.

Kylie
Minogue smiling and wearing a hat of hair
Studio album by
Released4 July 1988 (1988-07-04)
RecordedOctober 1987 – April 1988
Studio
Genre
Length35:22
Label
ProducerStock Aitken Waterman
Kylie Minogue chronology
Kylie
(1988)
Enjoy Yourself
(1989)
Singles from Kylie
  1. "I Should Be So Lucky"
    Released: 29 December 1987
  2. "Got to Be Certain"
    Released: 2 May 1988
  3. "The Loco-Motion"
    Released: 28 July 1988
  4. "Je ne sais pas pourquoi"
    Released: 10 October 1988
  5. "It's No Secret"
    Released: 15 December 1988
  6. "Turn It into Love"
    Released: 21 December 1988
Repackaged edition cover
The Kylie Collection artwork
The Kylie Collection artwork

Musically, Kylie is a bubblegum pop and dance-pop album. It received mixed reviews from music critics who criticized its dated production. It was a commercial success, peaking at number one in the United Kingdom for six weeks and becoming the fifth highest-selling album of the decade. It peaked at number two in her native Australia, while reaching the top ten in Germany, Norway, and Switzerland. Kylie was re-issued in 1988 as The Kylie Collection, and in 2015 when it returned to the UK Albums Chart. The album has sold over five million copies worldwide.

Six singles were released Kylie. "I Should Be So Lucky" reached number one in Australia and the United Kingdom, the first for any artist. The subsequent singles—"Got to Be Certain", the re-recorded "The Loco-Motion", and "Je ne sais pas pourquoi" all peaked in the top two on the UK Singles Chart. "It's No Secret" was her third top-forty single on the Billboard Hot 100, while "Turn It into Love" was released exclusively in Japan. The album's commercial success helped Minogue establish herself as an international teen idol and launch her recording career.

BackgroundEdit

Kylie Ann Minogue was born in Melbourne in 1968, the eldest of three children.[1] Kylie learned to play violin and piano at a very young age while taking singing and dancing lessons with her sister Dannii.[2] Kylie was a child actress from the age of eleven, appearing in cameo roles in The Sullivans (1979) and Skyways (1980).[3] In 1985, Kylie used her earnings from The Henderson Kids to record three songs with producer Greg Petherick at Young Talent Time, a weekly Australian music programme which already featured Dannii as a regular performer.[4] In April 1986, Kylie played Charlene Mitchell, a schoolgirl turned garage mechanic, in the soap opera Neighbours.[5] Jason Donovan, whom Kylie began dating at the time, played her onscreen love interest as Scott Robinson.[2] Their romantic relationship culminated with a wedding in an episode that attracted an audience of 20 million British viewers in 1987.[6]

During her time in Neighbours, Minogue joined a band along with cast members Guy Pearce, Peter O'Brien and Alan Dale, which Petherick arranged.[7] He later suggested Minogue cover the song "The Loco-Motion" with the band during a Fitzroy Football Club benefit concert at the Festival Hall in 1986, where she also sang a duet of "I Got You Babe".[8] Impressed by the performance, Petherick arranged for Minogue to record the former song, re-titled as "Locomotion", with producer Kaj Dahlstrom, who invested $10,000 to record it.[9] Petherick submitted the demo track to many record labels before reaching out to Michael Gudinski, head of Mushroom Records.[7] Gudinski was reluctant at first, calling the demo "a bit of a one-hit wonder".[9] During a trip to London several months after receiving the demo track, Gudinski decided to sign Minogue because of her popularity from Neighbours.[7] She signed with the label in early 1987.[10] Critics and employees of Mushroom Records gave polarised opinions; many thought it would be the end of the company and dubbed Minogue as "The Singing Budgie."[7]

In June 1987, Mushroom Records had Mike Duffy, an audio engineer for Stock Aitken Waterman producers, over for a three-month residency at Platinum Studios in South Yarra.[11] He was asked to remix the "Locomotion" demo track with the help of a synthesizer to make it sound more like Bananarama's cover of "Venus" (1986).[12] It was the first time he had produced a record himself.[9] The song was released as Minogue's debut single on 27 July 1987, three weeks after Neighbours wedding episode premiered.[7] A week after its release, the single topped the Australian charts, remaining there for seven weeks and becoming the best-selling single of the decade.[13] Around that time, Minogue was set up with Terry Blamey, who would be her manager for 25 years.[14]

RecordingEdit

 
Along with Matt Aitken and Mike Stock, Pete Waterman (pictured) wrote and produced Kylie

The success of "Locomotion" resulted in Minogue and Blamey travelling to London to work with Stock, Aitken and Waterman in September 1987.[15] Pete Waterman, the only member of the trio aware of Minogue's trip, was unavailable; he was busy making The Hit Man and Her and had not told Mike Stock she was in London.[16] Minogue and Blamey waited for ten days in their hotel without hearing from the producers.[17] They eventually turned up at the studio at the last minute.[18] The producers wrote "I Should Be So Lucky" in 40 minutes and Minogue recorded it quickly before she returned to Australia that afternoon to work on Neighbours.[19] Stock recalled the abrupt session: "Her ear is very tuned in so I sang her the tune and she sang it back at me and at that point I put the tapes aside and went on to other things ... We treated [Minogue] rather shabbily."[20] He wrote the lyrics in response to what he had learned about Minogue: although she was a successful soap star, he thought there had to be something wrong with her and figured she must be unlucky in love.[20] At the time, the producers did not take Minogue's career seriously because of time constraints and her obligations to Neighbours.[21] They did not even listen to the song until Waterman heard it played by a DJ at a Christmas party that year and thought that it was remarkable.[22]

In February 1988, Stock traveled to Melbourne and apologised to Minogue for her previous recording session.[20] They went on to record "Got to Be Certain" and "Turn It into Love" with her.[23] Recording sessions with Stock and engineer Karen Hewitt took place at Allan Eaton Studios and RBX Studios in Melbourne for only a couple of hours at night, between filming her last episodes for Neighbours.[24] She frequently broke down emotionally at the studio due to pressure from work.[24] The album was recorded in snatches; Stock taught Minogue the songs she would be recorded in an hour.[25] "If you could get four hours with her, it was the most you could get... We were almost not able to even play her the songs!," Waterman recalled.[26] Despite the pressure, he found the sessions wasn't stressful because of their work ethic, saying "that's what we were used to. In fact, in hindsight, the truth is it was so enjoyable because we didn't have time to get stressed."[26] In March, Minogue took a break from filming Neighbours to record the album in London.[23] The producers had a copy of "Locomotion" produced by Duffy, which Waterman was not keen on.[27] They re-recorded it with Minogue at their studio in London and changed the name back to "The Loco-Motion".[28] Portions of the vocals from the demo track were kept in the new version.[20] The singer stayed with her mother in Waterman's apartment during the recording sessions over Easter in 1988, which took place at PWL Studios 1, 2 & 5 (London).[29]

Music and lyricsEdit

Stock, Aitken, and Waterman composed and produced all the tracks on Kylie except "The Loco-Motion" written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King.[30] The producers wanted to make a smooth and synthesized pop album that appeals to teenagers.[31] The album also avoided getting into heavy statements and deep themes that might alienate Minogue's young fans.[31] The singer was interested in recording more contemporary R&B material but her request was denied by Waterman.[31] "These producers think pop music is candy music. They're saying: 'Here kids, have a piece of candy'... What Peterman wants, he gets", said Minogue.[31] Her voice was double-tracked for most of the album; the producers only allowed Minogue to use her real voice on "Look My Way", a track that she felt sounds more like herself than the rest.[31] Stock explained his intention was to make an album full of single-potential tracks, similar to the form of greatest hits compilations.[32]

Critics described Kylie as a bubblegum pop and dance-pop album.[33] Sal Cinquemani of Slant Magazine described it as a collection of house tracks blended with "hi-NRG beats, Italo-disco synths and Motown melodies."[34] Joe Sweeney of PopMatters and Quentin Harrison of Albumism noted the musical similarities to other albums produced by PWL, with the lyrics about romantic relationships and positive mentality.[35] Sweeney commented that such themes would later infuse Minogue's post-millennial work.[36] Matthew Lindsay of Classic Pop, on the other hand, pointed out the main themes about heartbreak, betrayal and frustration.[37] In a 2019 interview, Minogue said that she didn't realize at the time about the dark tone in the lyrics—in the case of "I Should Be So Lucky", she stated "We all sing like it's really happy, but it's not. She wishes she was lucky in love."[38]

Song analysisEdit

Kylie opens with "I Should Be So Lucky", a light dance-pop track that uses a drum machine, keyboards and bass by Stock.[39] It depicts a frustrated young woman who feels unlucky in romance and has been compared to the work of Rick Astley.[40] For the album's version of "The Loco-Motion", the producers re-recorded the backing track from Duffy's demo, featuring railway sound effects and less spontaneous vocals.[41] The slow-tempo "Je ne sais pas pourquoi" and reggae-infused "It's No Secret" contain melodies that are reminiscent of Waterman's earlier work in the 1960s at the Mecca Dance Hall.[42] "It's No Secret" features cascading synth and a jaunty melody, whose chorus begins with the line "Our love was a lie".[43] Minogue sings "Got to Be Certain", a lovelorn Hi-NRG track, in an upbeat and carefree way.[44] It was first recorded by fellow PWL artist Mandy Smith for her debut album but abandoned; both versions share the same musical backing.[45]

The sixth track, "Turn It Into Love", discusses unrequited love with a wistful-yet-optimistic approach.[46] Musically, the low-key Hi-NRG song gained comparison to the soundtrack of the 1983 romance film Flashdance.[47] The mid-tempo "I Miss You" and "I'll Still Be Loving You" resemble other late-80s pop tracks, particularly the work of Climie Fisher and Living in a Box.[42] Two final tracks, "Look My Way" and "Love at First Sight", were written for other PWL artists in the previous year before appearing on the album. Originally written for Heywoode, "Look My Way" draws musical inspiration from The Whispers' "Rock Steady" (1987), Madonna's "Into the Groove" (1984) and Debbie Gibson's "Shake Your Love" (1987).[44] "Love at First Sight", whose lyrics discusses a teenage love story, was an instrumental demo track for Sinitta and is unrelated to her 2002 song with the same title.[42]

Artwork and releaseEdit

 
Minogue singing the album's third single, "The Loco-Motion", during her Golden Tour (2018―19)

Kids and teenagers were the target audience for Kylie; Waterman adapted the idea and was fascinated by how teenagers reacted to Minogue's work.[32] It is reflected in the album's artwork, shot by photographer Lawrence Lawry, which shows Minogue grinning and wearing a hat of hair with curls cascading out of the top.[48] Designer David Howells said the artwork shows Minogue in a girlie and carefree way that kids can relate to, instead of "some icon on a pedestal".[49] He was inspired by the way teenagers tear pictures out of magazines and stick them to walls, referring to it as the "magazine approach".[50] Other PWL artists posing with hats using the same strategy can be seen on the covers of Mandy Smith's Mandy (1988), Minogue's follow-up Enjoy Yourself (1989) and Sonia's Everybody Knows (1990).[51] Ernie Long of The Morning Call noted similarities between the release of Kylie and the 1988 eponymous debut albums of Tracie Spencer and Rachele Cappelli. All three shows close-up shots of the singer on the front cover, while making silly facial expressions on the back.[52]

Kylie was first released in the UK on 4 July 1988, and was released in Australia a fortnight later, on 18 July 1988.[53] Similar to other late 80s records, the record company took control of Kylie's running orders and pushed future singles to the front.[42] Gudinski stated the producers from PWL were not focused on promoting Kylie in the United States' market.[5] However, Blamey sent Minogue to look into releasing her material during her two-week break there.[54] David Geffen, founder of Geffen Records, agreed in distributing the album after watching several video clips of Minogue.[54]

Additional releasesEdit

Kylie was repackaged as The Kylie Collection in Australia on 5 December 1988, featuring bonus mixes and music videos of the singles.[55] Ian Gormely of Exclaim! called it a compilation of "unremarkable and cheesy clips that present the singer as a clean-cut teen".[2] PWL re-released Kylie in Japan in 2012 with bonus mixes.[56] In October 2014, Cherry Red Records and PWL announced to re-released Kylie along with her studio albums Enjoy Yourself, Rhythm of Love (1990), and Let's Get to It (1991).[57] The release date was later postponed to 9 February 2015.[58] The albums have been digitally remastered from the original studio tapes. They were available on vinyl, CD, and DVD. This is the first time these albums have been released in the United Kingdom since their original release.[58]

Minogue's debut VHS release, The Videos, which was distributed by Mushroom Records in 1988 in Australia, contains the music videos for "The Loco-Motion" and "I Should Be So Lucky", as well as the behind the scenes footage.[59] That same year, a follow-up VHS titled Kylie: The Videos was released in Japan, France, and the United Kingdom. It included an interview with Minogue, as well as music videos for "Got to Be Certain" and "Je Ne Sais Pas Pourquoi".[60] Kylie: The Videos was the top-selling video in 1988 in the UK, with 330,000 copies sold after 42 weeks of release.[61] Kylie's Remixes, a nine-track remix compilation of seven songs from Kylie, was released in 1988 in Japan.[62] It peaked at number 13 on the Oricon Albums Chart and sold 84,000 copies, as of 2006.[63] It was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of Japan in May 1989.[64] The compilation was later released in Australia in 1993.[65]

PromotionEdit

After filming her last scenes for Neighbours in June and July 1988, Minogue was able to relocate to London to concentrate on the promotional work for Kylie.[66] This included her performances on Terry Wogan's television talk show and the opening for a new ride at Alton Towers amusement park.[67] Waterman also spent a large amount of money on TV advertising for the album.[68] In September, Minogue did a three-month promotional trip in the United States, Japan, Melbourne and the United Kingdom. The singer had to cut it short due to emotional exhaustion.[69] In October 1989, more than a year after the album was released, Minogue launched her first concert tour, Disco in Dream performing several songs from both Kylie and Enjoy Yourself.[70] It began in Japan, where she performed in front of 38,000 fans at the Tokyo Dome.[71] She later joined other artists from the PWL label on a ten-date theatre tour in the United Kingdom, which attracted 170,000 fans.[72] Its run in the United Kingdom was sponsored by local radio stations and was re-titled The Hitman Roadshow.[73] ALFA International and Video Collection International released the video album On the Go: Live in Japan in April 1990 in Japan and the United Kingdom.[74] It contained footage shot during the Disco in Dream concert tour and was available in VHS and Laserdisc formats.[74] A video from the concert tour with backstage footage and various clips of Kylie around Japan was shown on a Christmas special on ITV called Kylie On The Go in 1990.[75]

SinglesEdit

 
Minogue performing a medley of album singles "I Should Be So Lucky" and "Got to Be Certain" during her Kiss Me Once Tour (2014)

Despite the buzz surrounding "Locomotion" in 1987, Waterman could not get a major label interested in "I Should Be So Lucky". He decided to issue it on his own PWL Records imprint instead.[76] Released as the first single from Kylie in late December 1987, "I Should Be So Lucky" topped the charts in the United Kingdom and Australia, the first time this had been achieved by any artist.[77] It remained at number-one on the UK Singles Chart for five consecutive weeks, and on Australia's Kent Music Report for another sixth consecutive weeks.[78] It peaked at number twenty-eight on the Billboard Hot 100 and topped the charts in Switzerland, and Germany.[79] Two music videos were made for the single: one with Minogue singing in a bubble-filled bath, and another where she hangs out of a convertible BMW driving through Sydney.[80]

"Got to Be Certain", the second single, was released on 2 May 1988.[81] It was Minogue's third number-one single in Australia.[82] In the United Kingdom, it reached number two for three weeks, while peaking within the top ten in Germany and Switzerland.[83] Its music video shows Minogue doing a fashion photo shoot, singing on top of the KPMG Tower and alongside the Yarra River.[84] "The Loco-Motion" was released in Europe and the United States on 25 July 1988 as the third single.[85] It debuted on the UK Singles Chart at number two, setting the record for the highest entry by a female artist.[86] It also peaked at number three on the Billboard Hot 100, and number five on the RPM Canadian Top Singles chart.[87] The music video for "The Loco-Motion" was re-edited from footage of the original Australian release, which was shot at Essendon Airport and the ABC Studios in Melbourne.[88] In the video, Minogue is seen dancing against a backdrop of graffiti and singing in a studio, while her brother Brendan appeared as a cameo at the end of the clip.[89]

Originally planned as a double A-side with new track "Made in Heaven", "Je ne sais pas pourquoi" was released as the fourth single on 17 October 1988.[90] It was re-titled as "I Still Love You (Je Ne Sais Pas Pourquoi)" in Australia and the United States.[90] It was Kylie's fifth top two single on the UK Singles Chart, Minogue's strongest run of singles from an album—the four singles had sold a combine 1.8 million units in the UK in 1988 alone.[91] It also reached the top ten in Norway and New Zealand.[92] Its music video features Minogue dancing and speaking French.[84] The fifth single "It's No Secret" was released in North America, Japan and New Zealand on 7 February 1989.[93] It peaked at number 37 on the Billboard Hot 100, Minogue's third consecutive top forty single in the United States.[94] A still from the music video, which shows Minogue walking through to the beach and to a pool at the Mirage Resort, was used as the front cover of the Australian single release.[84] "Turn It into Love" was released exclusively in Japan as the fifth single, peaking at number 34. It had sold 46,320 copies in the country as of 2006.[95]

Critical receptionEdit

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic     [96]
Digital Spy     [97]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music     [98]
Number One     [99]
The Record     [100]
Record Mirror     [101]
Record-JournalF[102]
Smash Hits          [103]

Kylie received mixed reviews from contemporary music critics, many of whom questioned its production.[104] Tim Nicholson of Record Mirror wrote that besides the cover of "The Loco-Motion", the album is full of "rattling, Hi-NRG based perfect pop [songs]" that has hit-single potential.[101] In the Recommended section, the writers of Billboard applauded the cover of "The Loco-Motion" but found the "mechanical production and assembly-line writing... may lack the warm necessary for a U.S. breakthrough".[105] Chris Heath of Smash Hits praised the simple disco tracks,[103] while Shaun Carney of The Age criticized its calculated and commercialize nature.[106] Barbra Jaeger of The Record panned the overuse of drum machines and echo vocals by the SAW producers, finding their music is "just a variation of the same beat".[100]

Several reviewers criticized Minogue's vocal delivery.[107] J.D. Considine of The Baltimore Sun felt the record was aggravated by her lack of maturity and poor pronunciation, especially on "It's No Secret".[108] Donovan, writing a review of Kylie for Number One, suggested Minogue "sounds a bit too much like Minnie Mouse after a while."[99] Jim Zebora of American newspaper Record-Journal panned her nasal vocals and her lack of input on the songwriting and producing process, referring to the singer as another Madonna wannabe.[102] Long, on the other hand, felt her fragile voice sounds natural with the dance-pop material.[52] Dennis Hunt of The Los Angeles Times felt her voice sounds warmer and more human than other SAW collaborators.[109] Writing for The Age, Mike Daly commented that despite having a reasonable voice, Minogue was overpowered by the manufactured and forgettable production.[110]

In their retrospect reviews, Chris True from AllMusic and Nick Levine of Digital Spy panned the dated production but felt Minogue's upbeat personality compensated for its weaknesses.[111] In a review for the 2015 reissue of Kylie, Sweeney found the production flaws were made up by the "well-crafted melodies".[36] While reviewing the album on its 30th anniversary, Harrison described it as an "unassuming, but charming collection of well-intentioned commercial pop".[112] Rolling Stone suggested the songs are as "cheesily and identically redolent of the late 80s' as a pair of stone-washed jean shorts".[113] Classic Pop writers Ian Peel and Mark Elliot commended the memorable hooks and the Hi-NRG pop tunes that set the benchmark for her career; the latter critic ranked it as the third-best Stock Aitken Waterman album.[114] Cinquemani, however, ranked Kylie as Minogue's worst studio album in 2018, criticizing the lightweight content and her vocals as if "she was forced to suck down a lungful of helium".[34] In the Encyclopedia of Popular Music (2011), British writer Colin Larkin gave the album three out of five stars, classifying it as "recommended" and "highly listenable".[98]

At the ARIA Music Awards of 1988, Minogue won the Highest Selling Single for "Locomotion".[115] At the following ceremony, she received nominations for Breakthrough Artist – Album, Highest Selling Album, and Best Female Artist for Kylie, winning the second time for Highest Selling Single for "I Should Be So Lucky" and receiving the Special Achievement Award.[116] The single also earned Minogue a Japan Gold Disc Award for Single of the Year in 1989.[117] It was added to the National Film and Sound Archive's Sounds of Australia registry in 2011.[118]

Commercial performanceEdit

The album debuted at number two on the UK Albums Chart on 16 July 1988.[119] In its seventh week, it peaked at number one and stayed there for four consecutive weeks.[120] Minogue became the youngest artist to have a number-one album when she was 20 years and 8 months old—she held that record until Canadian recording artist Avril Lavigne's Let Go reached the top of the chart in 2002, when she was 18.[121] Kylie topped the chart for two additional weeks in November, for a total of six weeks in the number-one position, her longest-running number-one album on this chart.[122] It was the best-selling album of 1988 in the UK, with sales of 1.29 million copies over the course of six months.[123] On 5 January 1989, it was certified six times platinum by British Phonographic Industry.[124] Kylie sold 1.9 million copies by the time Enjoy Yourself was released in late 1989, becoming the fifth highest-selling album of the decade—the highest by a female solo artist—in the UK.[125] It was the first album by a female solo artist to exceed sales of two million in the UK, selling 2,105,698 copies as of 2006.[126] Kylie returned to the UK Albums Chart in 2015, when the reissue peaked at number eighty-five on 15 February.[127]

In Minogue's native Australia, Kylie entered at number two, where it remained for three consecutive weeks. It stayed in the top fifty for a total of twenty-eight weeks.[128] It was certified four times platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association.[129] In New Zealand, it debuted at number ten, and eventually topped the chart for six weeks. It is her only number-one album in the region and stayed on the charts for a total of fifty-three weeks.[130] In November 1989, it was certified platinum by Recorded Music NZ.[131] The album reached the top ten in Germany, Norway, and Switzerland.[132] In the United States, it debuted and peaked at number fifty-three on the Billboard 200. This was Minogue's only charting album in the United States, until her 2001 album Fever hit the charts in 2002.[133] In 1989, the album was certified gold in the United States, selling over 500,000 copies.[134] Kylie was certified platinum in Hong Kong by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry for selling over 15,000 units.[135] In Japan, it peaked at number 30 and sold 102,000 copies as of 2006.[136] As of 2018, Kylie has sold over five million copies worldwide.[137]

ImpactEdit

 
Donovan, Minogue's then-boyfriend and Neighbours co-star, pursued his singing career after being motivated by the success of Kylie

The album's commercial success helped Minogue establish herself as an international teen idol and launch her recording career.[138] Writing for Official Charts Company, Justin Myers opined "If 1988 was anyone's year it was Kylie Minogue's... She was the most exciting thing to happen to pop for quite a long time."[139] Jim Schembri of The Guardian wrote the success of Kylie and its singles, her popular concerts in Britain and Japan, as well as her public appearances have quickly "turned [Minogue] into a pop cultural icon—as well as a multi-millionare".[140] Guinness World Records recognized Minogue as the most successful foreign UK chart debut for Kylie; the record was later equaled by Irish boy band Boyzone in 1998.[141]

In the US market, Kylie was a notable pop album among dozens of popular Australian rock-oriented releases in the late 1980s, including albums by rock bands INXS, Midnight Oil, Crowded House, The Church, and Icehouse.[142] Following its release in the US, Minogue was considered as one of the most aspiring female teen pop artists, along with American singers Debbie Gibson and Tiffany.[143] George Albert of The Sentinel viewed 1988 as a remarkable year for young female acts—he identified Minogue, Martika, Taylor Dayne, and Karyn White as a group of emerging artists who specialized in singing instead of writing music, and willing to record well-crafted contemporary pop songs that have potential on the music charts.[144]

Music journalists attributed the album's success to Minogue's already established image as Charlene on Neighbours.[145] She made a risky transition to music at a time when not many established actors in television chose to make a record.[146] Motivated by the success of Kylie, Donovan pursued his singing career with SAW and signed with Mushroom Records.[147] He recorded "Especially for You" with Minogue in late 1988, which became the fourth highest-selling single of the year, and left Neighbours the following year.[148] Minogue went on to make three more studio albums with SAW until 1991, when Aitken left the trio.[149] Minogue has since felt detached from the album, saying in an interview in late 1988: "I didn't have much say about [the album] and it doesn't sound like me. [SAW] did what they thought they had to do to deliver a hit, which they did. But the album still isn't me".[109]

Track listingEdit

All songs written, produced and arranged by Mike Stock, Matt Aitken and Pete Waterman, except where noted.

Kylie – Standard version[30]
No.TitleLength
1."I Should Be So Lucky"3:24
2."The Loco-Motion" (writers: Gerry Goffin, Carole King)3:13
3."Je ne sais pas pourquoi"4:01
4."It's No Secret"3:57
5."Got to Be Certain"3:18
6."Turn It into Love"3:36
7."I Miss You"3:15
8."I'll Still Be Loving You"3:49
9."Look My Way"3:36
10."Love at First Sight"3:10
Total length:35:22
The Kylie Collection – Side C[150]
No.TitleLength
1."I Should Be So Lucky" (Extended mix)6:03
2."The Loco-Motion" (Kohaku Mix)5:55
The Kylie Collection – Side D[150]
No.TitleLength
1."I Still Love You (Je ne sais pas pourquoi)" (Moi Non Plus Mix)5:51
2."Got to Be Certain" (Extended)6:34
3."Made in Heaven" (Maid in Australia Mix)6:16
The Kylie Collection – VHS version[151]
No.TitleLength
1."I Should Be So Lucky" (Music video)3:35
2."Got to Be Certain" (Music video)3:17
3."The Loco-Motion" (Music video)3:17
4."Je Ne Sais Pas Pourquoi" (Music video)4:25
5."It's No Secret" (Music video)4:58
6."Made in Heaven" (Music video)3:40
Kylie's Remixes[62]
No.TitleLength
1."I Should Be So Lucky" (The Bicentennial Remix)6:12
2."Got to Be Certain" (The Extra Beat Boys Remix)6:52
3."The Loco-Motion" (The Sankie Remix)6:36
4."Je Ne Sais Pas Pourquoi" (Moi Non Plus Mix)5:55
5."Turn It into Love"3:37
6."It's No Secret" (Extended version)5:49
7."Je Ne Sais Pas Pourquoi" (The Revolutionary Mix)7:16
8."I Should Be So Lucky" (New Remix)5:33
9."Made in Heaven" (Made in England Mix)6:19
Total length:54:09
Kylie – 2012 Japanese reissue bonus tracks[56]
No.TitleLength
11."Made in Heaven"3:33
12."Getting Closer" (Extended OZ Mix)4:10
13."I Should Be So Lucky" (The Bicentennial Mix)6:11
14."Got to Be Certain" (Extended)6:35
15."The Loco-Motion" (The Kohaku Mix)5:59
16."It's No Secret" (Alternative Extended Version)5:47
17."Je Ne Sais Pas Pourquoi" (The Revolutionary Mix)7:14
Kylie – 2015 reissue deluxe version (Disc 1)[152]
No.TitleLength
11."Made in Heaven"3:33
12."Locomotion"3:16
13."I Should Be So Lucky" (Extended Version)6:06
14."Got to Be Certain" (Extended)6:35
15."The Loco-Motion" (The Kohaku Mix)5:59
16."Je ne sais pas pourquoi" (Moi Non Plus Mix)5:53
17."It's No Secret" (Extended)5:47
18."Made in Heaven" (Maid in England Mix)6:17
Kylie – 2015 reissue deluxe version (Disc 2)[152]
No.TitleLength
1."Locomotion" (Chugga Motion Mix)7:37
2."Getting Closer" (Extended Oz Mix)4:11
3."I Should Be So Lucky" (The Bicentennial Mix)6:11
4."Got to Be Certain" (Extra Beat Boys Remix)6:51
5."The Loco-Motion" (The Sankie Remix)6:37
6."Je ne sais pas pourquoi" (The Revolutionary Mix)7:15
7."Made in Heaven" (Original 12" Mix)7:10
8."I Should Be So Lucky" (12" Remix)5:31
9."The Loco-Motion" (12" Master)9:12
10."Glad to Be Alive" (writers: Claude Carranza, Craig Harnath)3:41
11."Getting Closer" (UK Mix)4:02
12."Made in Heaven" (Heaven Scent Mix)4:45
13."The Loco-Motion" (The Oz Tour Mix)5:40
Kylie – 2015 reissue deluxe version (Disc 3)[152]
No.TitleLength
1."I Should Be So Lucky" (Music video) 
2."Got to Be Certain" (Music video) 
3."The Loco-Motion" (Music video) 
4."Je Ne Sais Pas Pourquoi" (Music video) 
5."It's No Secret" (Music video) 
6."Made in Heaven" (Music video) 
7."Locomotion" (Australian version, part of the bonus footage section) 
8."I Should Be So Lucky" (Alternative version, part of the bonus footage section) 
9."Got to Be Certain" (Original version, part of the bonus footage section) 
10."Got to Be Certain" (Location-only, part of the bonus footage section) 
11."Interviews & Behind the Scenes" (Part of the bonus footage section) 
12."The Loco-Motion" (Live on Top of the Pops) 
13."Je Ne Sais Pas Pourquoi" (Live on Top of the Pops) 

PersonnelEdit

Credits adapted from the album's liner notes.[30]

ChartsEdit

Certifications and salesEdit

Certifications and sales for Kylie
Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[129] 4× Platinum 280,000^
France (SNEP)[175] Platinum 316,300[174]
Finland (Musiikkituottajat)[176] Gold 25,000[176]
Germany (BVMI)[177] Gold 250,000^
Hong Kong (IFPI Hong Kong)[135] Platinum 20,000*
Japan 102,000[178]
New Zealand (RMNZ)[131] Platinum 15,000^
Switzerland (IFPI Switzerland)[179] Platinum 50,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[124] 6× Platinum 2,105,698[180]
United States (RIAA)[134] Gold 500,000^

* Sales figures based on certification alone.
^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

Release historyEdit

Release dates and formats for Kylie
Region Date Format(s) Distributor(s) Ref(s).
United Kingdom 4 July 1988 PWL [181]
Various [182]
Japan Alfa [183]
Australia 18 July 1988 Mushroom [184]
United States 1988 Geffen [185]
Australia 5 December 1988
  • LP
  • cassette
  • VHS
Mushroom [186]
Japan 7 November 2012
  • CD
  • DVD
  • LP
PWL [56]
United Kingdom 9 February 2015 [58]
Japan 10 February 2015 [187]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ Smith 2014, p. 11; The Sydney Morning Herald 2005
  2. ^ a b c Gormely 2018
  3. ^ The Sydney Morning Herald 2005; Gormely 2018
  4. ^ Gormely 2018; Adams 2007
  5. ^ a b Adams 2017
  6. ^ Gormely 2018; Simpson 2008
  7. ^ a b c d e Adams 2007; Adams 2017
  8. ^ Adams 2017; Smith 2014, p. 49
  9. ^ a b c Adams 2007
  10. ^ Smith 2014, p. 51; Popson 1988
  11. ^ Adams 2007; Flynn 2019, p. 23: "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  12. ^ Adams 2017; Flynn 2019, p. 11: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark
  13. ^ Adams 2007; Adams 2017; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 39; Flynn 2019, p. 11: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark
  14. ^ Adams 2013; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 42
  15. ^ Adams 2007; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 44
  16. ^ a b Stomps & Walker 2003; Flynn 2019, p. 19: Track by Track from "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian
  17. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 44; Stomps & Walker 2003
  18. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 44
  19. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 11: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark; Stomps & Walker 2003
  20. ^ a b c d Stomps & Walker 2003
  21. ^ Kheraj 2016; Fat Gay Vegan 2015
  22. ^ Kheraj 2016; Flynn 2019, p. 11: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark
  23. ^ a b Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 46
  24. ^ a b Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 46; Flynn 2019, p. 13: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark; Adams 2017
  25. ^ Fat Gay Vegan 2015; Hunt 1988, p. 70
  26. ^ a b Fat Gay Vegan 2015
  27. ^ Adams 2017; Flynn 2019, p. 14: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark; Hunt 1988, p. 70
  28. ^ Adams 2017; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 48
  29. ^ Myers 2013; Mushroom 1988a
  30. ^ a b c Mushroom 1988a
  31. ^ a b c d e Hunt 1988, p. 70
  32. ^ a b Flynn 2019, p. 26: "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  33. ^ True A; Flynn 2019, p. 14: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark; Long 1988
  34. ^ a b Cinquemani 2018
  35. ^ Sweeney 2015; Harrison 2018
  36. ^ a b Sweeney 2015
  37. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 30: Devil in the Details from "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  38. ^ Gillespie 2019
  39. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 44; Flynn 2019, p. 19: Track by Track from "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian
  40. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 11: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark; Felt 2005; Sweeney 2015
  41. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 19: Track by Track from "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian; Adams 2007
  42. ^ a b c d Flynn 2019, p. 19: Track by Track from "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian
  43. ^ Sweeney 2015; Flynn 2019, p. 30: Devil in the Details from "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  44. ^ a b Flynn 2019, p. 19: Track by Track from "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian; Flynn 2019, p. 30: Devil in the Details from "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  45. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 13: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark; Flynn 2019, p. 19: Track by Track from "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian; Adams 2018
  46. ^ Sweeney 2015; Levine 2010
  47. ^ Sweeney 2015; Adams 2018
  48. ^ Myers 2013; Flynn 2019, p. 115: Hat Tricks from "Dress Me Up 100 Ways" by Guiltenane, Christian
  49. ^ Flynn 2019, pp. 26–27: "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew; Flynn 2019, p. 115: Hat Tricks from "Dress Me Up 100 Ways" by Guiltenane, Christian
  50. ^ Flynn 2019, pp. 26–27: "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  51. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 115: Hat Tricks from "Dress Me Up 100 Ways" by Guiltenane, Christian
  52. ^ a b Long 1988
  53. ^ Mushroom 1988a; Levine 2010; Australian Music Report 1988
  54. ^ a b Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 47
  55. ^ Pymble 1988; Carney 1988b; Mushroom 1988b; Mushroom 1988c; Mushroom 1988d
  56. ^ a b c PWL 2012
  57. ^ PWL Records 2014; Classic Pop 2014
  58. ^ a b c PWL & Cherry Red 2015a; PWL Records 2014; Classic Pop 2014
  59. ^ Mushroom 1988e
  60. ^ PWL 1988a; PWL 1988b; CBS 1988
  61. ^ Music Week 1989
  62. ^ a b PWL 1988c
  63. ^ Oricon A; Okamoto 2006a
  64. ^ Recording Industry Association of Japan A
  65. ^ Mushroom 1993
  66. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 14: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 50
  67. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 50
  68. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 14: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark
  69. ^ Popson 1988; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 52
  70. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 61
  71. ^ The Daily Telegraph 2017
  72. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 66; Collinson 2015
  73. ^ Collinson 2015
  74. ^ a b Video Collection International 1990; ALFA International 1990
  75. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 65
  76. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 13: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark; Flynn 2019, p. 21: "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian; Elliot 2018
  77. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 13: "The Sweet Sensation" by Elliot, Mark; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 45
  78. ^ Copsey 2019; ARIA Charts 2018
  79. ^ Billboard A; Hung Medien A; GfK Entertainment Charts A
  80. ^ Wright 2015; Flynn 2019, p. 21: The Big Picture – The Videos from "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian
  81. ^ Kylie.com A
  82. ^ Australian Recording Industry Association 2017
  83. ^ Official Charts Company A; Kylie.com A
  84. ^ a b c Flynn 2019, p. 21: The Big Picture – The Videos from "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian
  85. ^ Kylie.com B; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 48
  86. ^ Myers 2013; Kylie.com B
  87. ^ Billboard A; RPM 1988b
  88. ^ Kylie.com B; Kylie.com C
  89. ^ Adams 2007; Hill 2015
  90. ^ a b Kylie.com D; Myers 2013
  91. ^ Official Charts Company A; Copsey 2019; Music Week 1989
  92. ^ Hung Medien B; Hung Medien C
  93. ^ Myers 2013; Kylie.com E
  94. ^ Billboard A; Kylie.com E
  95. ^ Kylie.com F; Okamoto 2006b
  96. ^ True A
  97. ^ Levine 2010
  98. ^ a b Larkin 2011, pp. 3435–3437, "Kylie Minogue"
  99. ^ a b Donovan 1988
  100. ^ a b Jaeger 1988
  101. ^ a b Nicholson 1988
  102. ^ a b Zebora 1988
  103. ^ a b Heath 1988
  104. ^ The Daily Telegraph 2018; Dolman-Telling 1988
  105. ^ Rosenbluth & Morris 1988
  106. ^ Carney 1988a
  107. ^ Dolman-Telling 1988; Hunt 1988, p. 70
  108. ^ Considine 1988
  109. ^ a b Hunt 1988, p. 79
  110. ^ Daly 1988
  111. ^ True A; Levine 2010
  112. ^ Harrison 2018
  113. ^ Kemp 2004, p. 544, "Kylie Minogue"
  114. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 19: Track by Track from "Classic Album: Kylie" by Peel, Ian; Elliot 2018
  115. ^ ARIA Music Awards A
  116. ^ ARIA Music Awards B
  117. ^ Recording Industry Association of Japan B
  118. ^ Taylor 2011
  119. ^ Official Charts Company B
  120. ^ Official Charts Company A; Official Charts Company C
  121. ^ Carrier 1999; Gormely 2018; Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 48; Music Week 2012
  122. ^ Official Charts Company A; Copsey 2019
  123. ^ a b Scaping 1991, pp. 66–67: "Top 100 Albums: 1988"; Kylie.com G; Copsey 2019; Myers 2013
  124. ^ a b British Phonographic Industry
  125. ^ Music Week 1989; Jones 1989; Savage 2020
  126. ^ Official Charts Company D; Harris 2006
  127. ^ a b Official Charts Company E
  128. ^ a b Hung Medien D
  129. ^ a b c Ryan 2011, pp. 190–191; Australian Recording Industry Association 2018
  130. ^ a b Hung Medien E
  131. ^ a b Recorded Music NZ A
  132. ^ GfK Entertainment Charts B; Hung Medien F; Hung Medien G
  133. ^ a b Billboard B
  134. ^ a b Recording Industry Association of America
  135. ^ a b IFPI Hong Kong
  136. ^ a b Oricon B; Okamoto 2006a
  137. ^ Kylie.com G; The Daily Telegraph 2018
  138. ^ Goodall & Stanley-Clarke 2012, p. 48; Harrison 2018; Popson 1988; True A; True B
  139. ^ Myers 2013
  140. ^ Schembri 1989
  141. ^ Carrier 1999; Music Week 1989
  142. ^ The News-Messenger 1988; The Post-Crescent 1988
  143. ^ USA Weekend 1988; The News-Messenger 1988
  144. ^ Albert 1988
  145. ^ Tuohy 1988; Adams 2017
  146. ^ True B; Adams 2017
  147. ^ Saner 2021; Tuohy 1988
  148. ^ Tuohy 1988; Scaping 1991, pp. 64–65: "Top 100 Singles: 1988"; Saner 2021
  149. ^ Flynn 2019, p. 31: "The Hitmen & Her" by Lindsay, Matthew
  150. ^ a b Mushroom 1988b
  151. ^ Mushroom 1988d
  152. ^ a b c PWL & Cherry Red 2015a
  153. ^ Hung Medien H
  154. ^ RPM 1988a
  155. ^ Billboard 1988
  156. ^ Hung Medien I
  157. ^ Music & Media 1988
  158. ^ InfoDisc C
  159. ^ GfK Entertainment Charts B
  160. ^ Hung Medien F
  161. ^ Salaverrie 2005
  162. ^ Hung Medien J
  163. ^ Hung Medien G
  164. ^ Official Charts Company C
  165. ^ Lazell 2002, section "M"
  166. ^ Australian Recording Industry Association
  167. ^ Music & Media 1989a
  168. ^ InfoDisc D
  169. ^ GfK Entertainment Charts C
  170. ^ Hung Medien K
  171. ^ Recorded Music NZ B
  172. ^ Music & Media 1989b
  173. ^ Jones 1989
  174. ^ InfoDisc B
  175. ^ InfoDisc E
  176. ^ a b Musiikkituottajat – IFPI Finland
  177. ^ Bundesverband Musikindustrie
  178. ^ Okamoto 2006a
  179. ^ IFPI Switzerland
  180. ^ Harris 2006
  181. ^ PWL 1988d
  182. ^ PWL 1988e
  183. ^ PWL 1988f
  184. ^ Australian Music Report 1988
  185. ^ Geffen 1988
  186. ^ Pymble 1988; Mushroom 1988b; Mushroom 1988c
  187. ^ PWL & Cherry Red 2015b

WebsitesEdit

Chart positions and certifications
Others

Media notesEdit

  • Kylie (Liner notes). Kylie Minogue. Australia: Mushroom. 1988. TVL-93277. Archived from the original on 28 September 2019. Retrieved 28 September 2019 – via Apple Music.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. United Kingdom: PWL. 1988. HFCD 3. Archived from the original on 6 December 2008. Retrieved 2 October 2007 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. South Korea: PWL. 1988. SWPR-001. Archived from the original on 6 December 2008. Retrieved 2 October 2007 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: PWL. 1988. 32XB-280. Archived from the original on 6 December 2008. Retrieved 2 October 2007 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: PWL. 2012. ASIN B009L6QOKY. TOCP-71441. Archived from the original on 5 August 2019 – via Oricon.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. United States: Geffen. 1988. 9 24195-2. Archived from the original on 6 December 2008. Retrieved 2 October 2007 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie (Media notes). Kylie Minogue (Collector's ed.). UK & Europe: PWL / Cherry Red. 2015. ASIN B00MR2NMQI. KYLIE 1 X. Archived from the original on 1 July 2019. Retrieved 20 October 2018.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: PWL / Cherry Red. 2015. ASIN B00MR2NOMU. KYLIE 1. Archived from the original on 7 October 2015. Retrieved 7 October 2015 – via Amazon.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie's Remixes (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: PWL. 1988. ASIN B0053F41BG. 25B2-20. Archived from the original on 15 March 2016 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie's Remixes (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Australia: Mushroom. 1993. D19756. Archived from the original on 28 January 2016. Retrieved 1 July 2019 – via AllMusic.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie: The Videos (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: PWL. 1988. 35BZ-2. Archived from the original on 14 October 2012 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie: The Videos (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. United Kingdom: PWL. 1988. ASIN B00008T7A4. UHF3. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Kylie: The Videos (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. France: CBS. 1988. ASIN B00008T7A4. CBS 049819 2.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • On the Go: Live in Japan (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. United Kingdom: Video Collection International. 1990. ASIN B001MNBKUI. VC 4093. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • On the Go: Live in Japan (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Japan: ALFA International. 1990. ASIN B00009MEDP. ALLB-5. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • The Kylie Collection (Media notes). Kylie Minogue (Double Vinyl ed.). Australia & New Zealand: Mushroom. 1988. TVL 93277. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 22 July 2007 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • The Kylie Collection (Media notes). Kylie Minogue (Cassette ed.). Australia & New Zealand: Mushroom. 1988. TVC 93277. Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 22 July 2007 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • The Kylie Collection (Media notes). Kylie Minogue (VHS ed.). Australia & New Zealand: Mushroom. 1988. 82052. Archived from the original on 1 July 2019. Retrieved 22 July 2007 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • The Videos (Media notes). Kylie Minogue. Australia: Mushroom. 1988. 80002. Archived from the original on 1 July 2019 – via Eil.com.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  • Stomps, Richard; Walker, Clinton (2 November 2003). "I Should Be So Lucky". Love is in the Air. Season 1. ABC. Archived from the original on 13 January 2017. Transcript archived on 3 July 2007.

Print sourcesEdit

Books
Newspapers and magazines

External linksEdit