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Korea women's national ice hockey team

The Korea women's national ice hockey team is a representative side which is composed of players from both South Korea and North Korea.

Korea
Shirt badge/Association crest
General ManagerLee Ji-yoon
Head coachSarah Murray
AssistantsRebecca Baker
Kim Do-yun
Pak Chol-ho
CaptainPark Jong-ah
Team colors         
IIHF codeN/A
Ranking
Current IIHFUnranked
First international
 Sweden 3–1 Korea 
(Incheon, South Korea; 5 February 2018)
Biggest win
None
Biggest defeat
  Switzerland 8–0 Korea 
(Gangneung, South Korea; 10 February 2018)
 Sweden 8–0 Korea 
(Gangneung, South Korea; 12 February 2018)
Olympics
Appearances1 (first in 2018)
International record (W–L–T)
0–5–0

The team competed at the 2018 Winter Olympics, competing as "Korea" under the IOC country code "COR".

Contents

HistoryEdit

In 2014, it was confirmed that South Korea women's national ice hockey team had qualified to participate at the 2018 Winter Olympics as part of the host country. Their participation at the 2018 Winter Olympics had been their second appearance following their debut in the 1998 Olympics in Nagano, Japan.[1]

South Korea had proposed a unified team of the two Koreas at the Games. It was proposed that the team would participate at least in the women's ice hockey event and possibly more disciplines.[2] The proposal came after North Korea competed in the Group A tournament of IIHF Women's World Championship Division II which was hosted in South Korea on April 2017.[3] North Korea initially refused the proposal in June 2017 on the grounds of time constraints.[4][5] However, an agreement was made with four weeks left before the Games commenced.[3]

On 20 January 2018, the International Olympic Committee allowed a Unified Korean team to compete in the women's ice hockey event for the 2018 Winter Olympics[6] under the "Olympic Korean Peninsula Declaration", allowing the team to compete as "Korea", using the acronym "COR".[7] On 30 January 2018, the full roster of the unified Korean team was named.[3]

The language difference of Korean spoken by players from South and North Korea became a challenge for the team during training. South and North Korea also use different terminology in ice hockey and head coach Sarah Murray does not speak Korean and has to rely her assistant and manager to communicate to the team's players.[8]

The unified team played their first friendly match against Sweden on 4 February 2018 at the Seonhak International Ice Rink in Incheon before an audience of 3,000 people ahead of the Winter Olympics.[9] They lost 1–3 to their European opposition.[10] The Koreans scored their only goal during the first period. Four of the 22 players in the roster for that game were North Koreans.[11]

Team imageEdit

 
The Korean Unification Flag was used by the team.

The anthem which plays when the Korea team plays in international ice hockey is the folk song Arirang instead of the national anthems of either South Korea or North Korea. The team's uniform features the silhouette of the Korean peninsula with the text "Korea".[10]

There was some opposition to the formation of the team. Critics of the unified team believe that the team has less chance to win a medal compared to a team solely composed of South Koreans.[12]

Olympic Games recordEdit

  • 2018 – Finished in 8th place

Fixtures and resultsEdit

Exhibition gamesEdit

4 February 2018Korea  1–3
(1–3, 0–0, 0–0)
  SwedenSeonhak International Ice Rink, Incheon
Attendance: 3,000

2018 Winter OlympicsEdit

Preliminary round – Group B
Pos Team Pld W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1    Switzerland 3 3 0 0 0 13 2 +11 9 Quarterfinals
2   Sweden 3 2 0 0 1 11 3 +8 6
3   Japan 3 1 0 0 2 6 6 0 3 Classification
4   Korea (H) 3 0 0 0 3 1 20 −19 0
Source: IIHF
(H) Host.
10 February 2018
21:10
Switzerland   8–0
(3–0, 3–0, 2–0)
  KoreaKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 3,606

12 February 2018
21:10
Sweden  8–0
(4–0, 1–0, 3–0)
  KoreaKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 4,244

14 February 2018
16:40
Korea  1–4
(0–2, 1–0, 0–2)
  JapanKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 4,110

5–8th place semifinal
18 February 2018
12:10
Switzerland   2–0
(1–0, 1–0, 0–0)
  KoreaKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 3,811

Seventh place game
20 February 2018
12:10
Sweden  6–1
(2–1, 1–0, 3–0)
  KoreaKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 4,125

TeamEdit

Current rosterEdit

The squad has a total of 35 players, more than other competing national teams at the Games although the IOC has mandated that only 22 players can play in each match "with respect to fair play" and that the coach must select at least three North Koreans to form the squad in each game.[7]

The following is the Korean roster for the women's ice hockey tournament at the 2018 Winter Olympics.[13]

Head coach:   Sarah Murray[14]     Assistant coaches:   Kim Do-yun,   Pak Chol-ho,   Rebecca Baker

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate 2017–18 team
1 G Genevieve Knowles 1.60 m (5.2 ft) 60 kg (130 lb) 25 April 2000   Phoenix
2 F Ko Hye-in 1.63 m (5.3 ft) 68 kg (150 lb) 18 July 1994   Ice Avengers
3 D Eom Su-yeon 1.68 m (5.5 ft) 60 kg (130 lb) 1 February 2001   Ice Avengers
4 F Kim Un-hyang 1.57 m (5.2 ft) 59 kg (130 lb) 10 December 1992   Kanggye
5 F Caroline Park 1.59 m (5.2 ft) 56 kg (123 lb) 18 November 1989   Phoenix
6 F Choi Yu-jung 1.56 m (5.1 ft) 56 kg (123 lb) 27 March 2000   Ice Beat
7 F Danelle Im 1.62 m (5.3 ft) 55 kg (121 lb) 21 January 1993   Phoenix
8 D Kim Se-lin 1.56 m (5.1 ft) 60 kg (130 lb) 3 April 2000   Ice Avengers
9 F Park Jong-ahC 1.60 m (5.2 ft) 59 kg (130 lb) 13 June 1996   Ice Avengers
10 F Choi Ji-yeon 1.59 m (5.2 ft) 52 kg (115 lb) 21 August 1998   Ice Avengers
11 D Park Ye-eun 1.62 m (5.3 ft) 54 kg (119 lb) 28 May 1996   Ice Beat
12 F Kim Hee-won 1.64 m (5.4 ft) 55 kg (121 lb) 1 August 2001   Ice Avengers
13 F Lee Eun-ji 1.54 m (5.1 ft) 48 kg (106 lb) 8 March 2001   Phoenix
14 F Ryo Song-hui 1.57 m (5.2 ft) 61 kg (134 lb) 15 January 1994   Taesongsan
15 D Park Chae-lin 1.58 m (5.2 ft) 52 kg (115 lb) 17 December 1998   Ice Beat
16 F Jo Su-sieA 1.62 m (5.3 ft) 55 kg (121 lb) 9 September 1994   Ice Beat
17 F Han Soo-jin 1.69 m (5.5 ft) 63 kg (139 lb) 22 September 1987   Ice Beat
18 F Kim Un-jong 1.56 m (5.1 ft) 63 kg (139 lb) 28 October 1992   Taesongsan
20 G Han Do-hee 1.59 m (5.2 ft) 60 kg (130 lb) 16 November 1994   Ice Avengers
21 F Lee Yeon-jeong 1.60 m (5.2 ft) 52 kg (115 lb) 2 November 1994   Ice Beat
22 F Jung Si-yun 1.71 m (5.6 ft) 64 kg (141 lb) 8 September 2000   Ice Avengers
23 D Park Yoon-jungA 1.71 m (5.6 ft) 65 kg (143 lb) 18 December 1992   Phoenix
24 D Cho Mi-hwan 1.60 m (5.2 ft) 58 kg (128 lb) 30 March 1995   Ice Avengers
25 G Ri Pom 1.63 m (5.3 ft) 62 kg (137 lb) 28 May 1995   Sajabong
26 F Kim Hyang-mi 1.62 m (5.3 ft) 72 kg (159 lb) 10 February 1995   Taesongsan
27 F Jong Su-hyon 1.60 m (5.2 ft) 58 kg (128 lb) 10 October 1996   Taesongsan
29 F Lee Jin-gyu 1.63 m (5.3 ft) 59 kg (130 lb) 13 January 2000   Phoenix
31 G Shin So-jung 1.65 m (5.4 ft) 63 kg (139 lb) 4 March 1990   Ice Beat
32 D Jin Ok 1.58 m (5.2 ft) 56 kg (123 lb) 28 January 1990   Kanggye
33 F Choe Un-gyong 1.52 m (5.0 ft) 52 kg (115 lb) 29 January 1994   Susan
37 F Randi Griffin 1.65 m (5.4 ft) 58 kg (128 lb) 2 September 1988   Phoenix
39 F Hwang Chung-gum 1.63 m (5.3 ft) 59 kg (130 lb) 11 September 1995   Taesongsan
41 D Hwang Sol-gyong 1.60 m (5.2 ft) 60 kg (130 lb) 9 January 1997   Jangjasan
42 D Ryu Su-jong 1.60 m (5.2 ft) 59 kg (130 lb) 24 July 1995   Kimchaek
47 D Choe Jong-hui 1.58 m (5.2 ft) 62 kg (137 lb) 12 December 1991   Kimchaek

All-time record against other nationsEdit

Last match update: 20 February 2018

Team GP W T L GF GA
  Japan 1 0 0 1 1 4
  Sweden 3 0 0 3 2 17
   Switzerland 2 0 0 2 0 10

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Steiss, Adam (19 September 2014). "Korea headed to the Olympics: National teams granted entry to PyeongChang 2018". IIHF. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  2. ^ "N. Korean IOC member keeps mum on Olympic co-hosting with S. Korea". Yonhap News Agency. 23 June 2017. Retrieved 7 October 2017.
  3. ^ a b c Merk, Martin (30 January 2018). "Unified Korean Team". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  4. ^ "N Korea refuses South's Olympic offer". BBC News. 26 June 2017. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  5. ^ Payne, Marissa (30 September 2017). "PyeongChang Olympic organizers happy to see first North Koreans qualify for 2018 Games". Washington Post. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  6. ^ Kim, Chang-keum (22 January 2018). "IOC announces decision to allow unified Korean hockey team". Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  7. ^ a b "Unified Korean Olympic Team to march at Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018". International Olympic Committee. 20 January 2018. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  8. ^ Siles, Matt (2 February 2018). "Koreas' unified women's hockey team has exposed a key difference between South and North — their language". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  9. ^ Myers, Paul (4 February 2018). "Korea's united ice hockey team loses warm-up match against Sweden". RFI. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  10. ^ a b Watson, Ivan; Ko, Stella; McKenzie, Sheena (5 February 2018). "Joint Korean ice hockey team plays for first time ahead of Olympics". CNN. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  11. ^ Choi, Won-suk (5 February 2018). "Joint Korea ice-hockey team plays their first game". The Korea Times. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  12. ^ "Winter Olympics: Joint Korean team loses first practice match". BBC News. 4 February 2018. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  13. ^ "Ice hockey Women – Team Roster – COR - Korea" (PDF). pyeongchang2018.com. 13 February 2018. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  14. ^ "Coach Profile: Sarah MURRAY". Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games. Retrieved 18 February 2018.