Japan women's national ice hockey team

The Japanese women's national ice hockey team (Japanese: アイスホッケー女子日本代表 Aisuhokkē Joshi Nippon Daihyō) represents Japan at the International Ice Hockey Federation's World Women's Championships. The women's national team is controlled by the Japan Ice Hockey Federation.[2][3][4][5][6] Japan has 2,587 female players as of 2017.[7]

Japan
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Smile Japan
(スマイルジャパン)
AssociationJapan Ice Hockey Federation
Head coachYuji Iizuka
AssistantsMasahito Haruna
Arto Sieppi
CaptainChiho Osawa
Most gamesHirano Yuka (67)
Most pointsKubo Hanae (54)
IIHF codeJPN
Ranking
Current IIHF6 Increase 1 (24 April 2020)[1]
Highest IIHF6 (2019)
Lowest IIHF11 (first in 2011)
First international
Japan  5–2  Netherlands
(North York or Mississauga, Ontario, Canada; 21 April 1987)
Biggest win
Japan  46–0  Hong Kong
(Sapporo, Japan; 21 February 2017)
Biggest defeat
Canada  18–0  Japan
(Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 22 March 1990)
Canada  18–0  Japan
(Richmond, British Columbia, Canada; 5 April 1996)
World Championships
Appearances17 (first in 1990)
Best result7th (2008, 2015)
Asian Winter Games
Appearances6 (first in 1996)
Best resultGold medal with cup.svg Gold (2017)
Challenge Cup of Asia
Appearances3 (first in 2010)
Best result1st place, gold medalist(s) Gold (2011, 2012)
Olympics
Appearances3 (first in 1998)
International record (W–L–T)
88–92–8

The nickname of Japan women's team is "Smile Japan" (Japanese: スマイルジャパン Sumairu Japan).[8]

Tournament recordEdit

Olympic GamesEdit

  • 1998 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2014 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2018 – Finished in 6th place

World ChampionshipEdit

  • 1990 – Finished in 8th place
  • 1999 – Finished in 9th place (1st in Group B, Promoted to Top Division)
  • 2000 – Finished in 8th place (Relegated to Division I).
  • 2001 – Finished in 10th place (2nd in Division I).
  • 2003 – Finished in 9th place (1st in Group B, Promoted to Top Division)
  • 2004 – Finished in 9th place (Relegated to Division I)
  • 2005 – Finished in 10th place (2nd in Division I)
  • 2007 – Finished in 10th place (1st in Group B, Promoted to Top Division)
  • 2008 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2009 – Finished in 8th place (Relegated to Division I)
  • 2011Withdrew from the tournament due to an earthquake.[9]
  • 2012 – Finished in 11th place (3rd in Division IA)
  • 2013 – Finished in 9th place (1st in Division IA, Promoted to Top Division)
  • 2015 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2016 – Finished in 8th place (Relegated to Division I)
  • 2017 – Finished in 9th place (1st in Division IA, Promoted to Top Division)
  • 2019 – Finished in 8th place
  • 2020 – Cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic[10]

Asian GamesEdit

  • 1996Finished in 2nd place  
  • 1999Finished in 2nd place  
  • 2003Finished in 2nd place  
  • 2007Finished in 2nd place  
  • 2011Finished in 2nd place  
  • 2017Finished in 1st place  

IIHF Challenge Cup of AsiaEdit

  • 2010Finished in 2nd place  
  • 2011Finished in 1st place  
  • 2012Finished in 1st place  

Pacific Rim ChampionshipEdit

  • 1995 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1996 – Finished in 4th place

TeamEdit

Current rosterEdit

Roster for the 2019 IIHF Women's World Championship.[11][12]

Head Coach: Yuji Iizuka

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Nana Fujimoto 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 56 kg (123 lb) (1989-03-03) 3 March 1989 (age 31)   Vortex Sapporo
2 D Shiori Koike 1.59 m (5 ft 3 in) 52 kg (115 lb) (1993-03-21) 21 March 1993 (age 27)   DK Peregrine
3 D Aoi Shiga 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (1999-07-04) 4 July 1999 (age 20)   Toyota Cygnus
4 D Ayaka Toko 1.60 m (5 ft 3 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (1994-08-22) 22 August 1994 (age 25)   Seibu Rabbits
6 D Sena Suzuki 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (1991-08-04) 4 August 1991 (age 28)   Toronto Furies
8 D Akane HosoyamadaA 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 59 kg (130 lb) (1992-03-09) 9 March 1992 (age 28)   DK Peregrine
9 D Kanami Seki 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) 65 kg (143 lb) (2000-06-23) 23 June 2000 (age 19)   Daishin Hockey
10 F Haruna Yoneyama 1.60 m (5 ft 3 in) 53 kg (117 lb) (1991-11-07) 7 November 1991 (age 28)   DK Peregrine
11 F Mei Miura 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 64 kg (141 lb) (1998-11-16) 16 November 1998 (age 21)   Toyota Cygnus
12 F Chiho OsawaC 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 64 kg (141 lb) (1992-02-10) 10 February 1992 (age 28)   Luleå HF
13 F Moeko FujimotoA 1.56 m (5 ft 1 in) 56 kg (123 lb) (1992-08-05) 5 August 1992 (age 27)   Toyota Cygnus
14 F Haruka Toko 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 64 kg (141 lb) (1997-03-16) 16 March 1997 (age 23)   Seibu Rabbits
15 F Rui Ukita 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 70 kg (150 lb) (1996-06-06) 6 June 1996 (age 23)   Daishin Hockey
16 F Akane Shiga 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 61 kg (134 lb) (2001-03-03) 3 March 2001 (age 19)   Obihiro Ladies
17 F Kaho Suzuki 1.60 m (5 ft 3 in) 53 kg (117 lb) (2002-02-02) 2 February 2002 (age 18)   Daishin Hockey
18 F Suzuka Taka 1.61 m (5 ft 3 in) 51 kg (112 lb) (1996-10-16) 16 October 1996 (age 23)   DK Perigrine
21 F Hanae Kubo 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in) 64 kg (141 lb) (1982-12-10) 10 December 1982 (age 37)   Seibu Rabbits
25 F Hikaru Yamashita 1.57 m (5 ft 2 in) 52 kg (115 lb) (2000-09-23) 23 September 2000 (age 19)   DK Peregrine
26 F Yoshino Enomoto 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 61 kg (134 lb) (1998-09-28) 28 September 1998 (age 21)   Seibu Rabbits
27 F Remi Koyama 1.46 m (4 ft 9 in) 52 kg (115 lb) (2000-07-17) 17 July 2000 (age 19)   Seibu Rabbits
28 D Shiori Yamashita 1.58 m (5 ft 2 in) 50 kg (110 lb) (2002-04-28) 28 April 2002 (age 18)   DK Peregrine
29 G Mai Kondo 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (1992-04-04) 4 April 1992 (age 28)   Mikage Gretz
30 G Akane Konishi 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) 62 kg (137 lb) (1995-08-14) 14 August 1995 (age 24)   Seibu Rabbits

Notable former playersEdit

CoachesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "IIHF Women's World Ranking". IIHF. 24 April 2020. Retrieved 24 April 2020.
  2. ^ "Women's ice hockey team "Smile Japan" chase Olympic dream – Olympic News". Olympic.org. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  3. ^ Samer Kalaf (18 December 2013). "Japan's Women's Hockey Team Is The Lovable Underdog of the Olympics". Deadspin.com. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  4. ^ Meadows, Mark (1 April 2009). "Ice hockey-Japan's 'Bunnies' boiled by economic crisis". Blogs.reuters.com. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  5. ^ Watanabe, Tadashi. "Women's ice hockey team banking on Sochi". The Japan Times. Retrieved 18 October 2016.
  6. ^ "Japan's ice hockey women chase Olympic dream". Al Jazeera English. 18 December 2013. Retrieved 18 October 2016.
  7. ^ IIHF profile
  8. ^ Asahi Newspaper Digital: Nickname is "Smile Japan" Women's National Ice Hockey Team (in Japanese) Archived 28 March 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ Japanese National Teams Withdraw from World Championships
  10. ^ "Women's Worlds cancelled". iihf.com. 7 March 2020.
  11. ^ "女子世界選手権 日本代表メンバー決定". jihf.or.jp. 22 March 2019.
  12. ^ 2019 IIHF Women's World Championship roster
  13. ^ "Death Note–Advisor Kawabuchi". Japan Ice Hockey Federation (in Japanese). 20 January 2014. Retrieved 5 March 2019.
  14. ^ "Tsutomu Kawabuchi Team Staff Profile". Elite Prospects. Retrieved 5 March 2019.

External linksEdit