Kirby Grindalythe

Kirby Grindalythe is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated about 8 miles (13 km) south-east of Malton. The village lies in the Great Wold Valley and the course of the winterbourne stream the Gypsey Race passes through it.

Kirby Grindalythe
KirbyGrindalythe(StephenHorncastle)Apr2006.jpg
Kirby Grindalythe
Kirby Grindalythe is located in North Yorkshire
Kirby Grindalythe
Kirby Grindalythe
Location within North Yorkshire
Population295 (2011 census)[1]
OS grid referenceSE905675
• London180 mi (290 km) S
Civil parish
  • Kirby Grindalythe
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townMALTON
Postcode districtYO17
PoliceNorth Yorkshire
FireNorth Yorkshire
AmbulanceYorkshire
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
54°05′45″N 0°37′02″W / 54.09576°N 0.61736°W / 54.09576; -0.61736Coordinates: 54°05′45″N 0°37′02″W / 54.09576°N 0.61736°W / 54.09576; -0.61736

The civil parish of Kirby Grindalythe, which includes the village of Duggleby, had a population of 247 people living in 92 households at the time of the 2001 Census.[2] The population at the 2011 Census had risen to 295.[1]

The name of the village is derived from Old Norse. Kirby kirkiubỹr means "village with a church", the Grindal element is a distortion of Cranedale, meaning "valley with cranes" and lythe is from Old Norse "hlíõ" meaning slope.[3] The village lies in the historic county boundaries of the East Riding of Yorkshire.

In 1823 Kirby Grindalythe was a civil parish with a population of 178 in the Wapentake of Buckrose.[4]

Kirby Grindalythe village has a resident population of roughly fifty. There are no shops, pubs or other services and the nearest town is Malton. The church of St Andrew's at Kirby Grindalythe is on the Sykes Churches Trail having been restored by Sir Tatton Sykes in 1872–5 and again more recently after a grant of about £175,000 from English Heritage.[5] The church is now a Grade II* listed building.[6]

The village is also the location of the Cranedale Centre, a residential Field Studies Centre providing courses in environmental subjects and outdoor education to people of all ages. The centre operates from a converted farm and has been open since 1983.

High MowthorpeEdit

Also in the civil parish is the former hamlet of High Mowthorpe (54°06′29″N 0°38′32″W / 54.10819°N 0.64231°W / 54.10819; -0.64231 (High Mowthorpe) ),[7] which is now an ADAS farm and arable research centre. The farm is a mixed arable and livestock farm, covering 437 hectares (1,080 acres) with 97 hectares (240 acres) managed organically.[8] Laboratory and glasshouse facilities are located on the site as well as a weather station providing data to the Met Office.[9] High Mowthorpe is also the home of ADAS Pest Evaluation Services, which processes approximately 4,000 soil and plant samples annually to determine pest and disease levels.

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Kirby Grindalythe Parish (1170217258)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
  2. ^ UK Census (2001). "Local Area Report – Kirby Grindalythe Parish (1543510553)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  3. ^ Ekwall, Eilert (1980). The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-names (Fourth ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 279. ISBN 0-19-869103-3.
  4. ^ Baines, Edward (1823): History, Directory and Gazetteer of the County of York, p. 361
  5. ^ "Kirby Grindalythe Succeeded — So Can You!". www.eychurches.org.uk. 2007. Archived from the original on 27 February 2012. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  6. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Andrew (1174946)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  7. ^ "Kirby Grindalythe Parish information from Bulmers' 1892". Genuki. 2008. Retrieved 10 November 2009.
  8. ^ "High Mowthorpe". ADAS. Archived from the original on 3 September 2011. Retrieved 10 November 2009.
  9. ^ "Met Office: search results". Met Office. Archived from the original on 26 August 2011. Retrieved 10 November 2009.

External linksEdit