Kershaw County, South Carolina

Kershaw County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2020 census, its population was 65,403,[1] up from 61,697 in 2010.[2] The county seat and largest city is Camden.[3] The county was created in 1791 from parts of Claremont, Lancaster, Fairfield, and Richland counties.[4] It is named for Col. Joseph Kershaw (1727–1791), an early settler and American Revolutionary War patriot.

Kershaw County
Kershaw County, South Carolina, original courthouse in Camden by Robert Mills built about 1827, now home of the Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center
Kershaw County, South Carolina, original courthouse in Camden by Robert Mills built about 1827, now home of the Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center
Map of South Carolina highlighting Kershaw County
Location within the U.S. state of South Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting South Carolina
South Carolina's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 34°20′N 80°35′W / 34.34°N 80.59°W / 34.34; -80.59
Country United States
State South Carolina
Founded1791
Named forJoseph Brevard Kershaw
SeatCamden
Largest cityCamden
Area
 • Total740 sq mi (1,900 km2)
 • Land727 sq mi (1,880 km2)
 • Water14 sq mi (40 km2)  1.9%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total65,403
 • Density88/sq mi (34/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district5th
Websitewww.kershaw.sc.gov

Kershaw County is part of the Columbia, South Carolina Metropolitan Statistical Area.

HistoryEdit

Kershaw County was named for Col. Joseph Kershaw (1727–1791), an early settler considered as "the father of Camden". Originally part of Camden District, Kershaw County was formed in 1791 from parts of Claremont, Lancaster, Fairfield, and Richland counties. The county seat is Camden, the oldest inland city in South Carolina. This site was settled around 1732 by English traders and farmers who moved inland from Charleston. Welsh Baptists moved the area in large numbers in the 1740s and 1750s. At the time, in England and Wales Protestants who were not from the established Anglican church were politically disadvantaged in various ways, however, in South Carolina they could still practice freely (provided that they called their churches "meeting houses.") Baptists from Abergavenny, Trap, Carmarthenshire, Llanbedr, Crickhowell, Vale of Grwyney, Abertillery, Griffithstown and Brecon arrived in what has since become Kershaw County between 1740 and 1760, primarily arriving as large family units. They were joined by a similar migration of English Baptists who came from Long Sutton, Lincolnshire, Boston, Lincolnshire, Coningsby, Grantham, as well as Christchurch, Dorset and Lymington.[5][6] From about 1800 until about 1867, the county was known as Kershaw District.[7]

During the American Revolutionary War, the British occupied Camden from June 1780 to May 1781. Fourteen battles took place in the area, including the Battle of Camden in 1780 and the Battle of Hobkirk's Hill in 1781.

Several notable soldiers have come from Kershaw County. After the state seceded from the Union, six men served in the American Civil War as Confederate generals: James Cantey (1818–1873), James Chesnut (1815–1885), Zachariah C. Deas (1819–1882), John Doby Kennedy (1840–1896), Joseph Brevard Kershaw (1822–1894), and John Bordenave Villepigue (1830–1862). Richard Rowland Kirkland, a Confederate soldier and hero at the Battle of Fredericksburg, was also from Kershaw County. He served under General Kershaw. In the last months of the war, Union troops under Gen. William T. Sherman burned parts of Camden in February 1865, in their March to the Sea.

Under the 1868 South Carolina Constitution, the Kershaw District became home rule Kershaw County with the state representatives also being county commissioners. During the Reconstruction era, some freedmen and other men of color were elected to various political offices. Among them was Henry Cardozo, who had been pastor of Old Bethel Methodist Church in Charleston, South Carolina. He served in the state senate as a Republican from Kershaw County, from 1870 to 1874.[8] (February 1, 1836 – July 22, 1903) was an American clergyman, politician, and educator. When Francis Lewis Cardozo was elected in South Carolina as Secretary of State in 1868, he was the first African American to hold a statewide office in the United States.

During World War I, two Kershaw County men were awarded the Medal of Honor in two separate actions while fighting in France in October 1918. The first was Richmond Hobson Hilton, recognized for actions taking place on October 11, 1918, during which he lost an arm. The second was John Canty Villepigue on October 15, 1918; he was wounded so severely in the action for which he was recognized that he died several months later from his injuries. Villepigue was a descendant of General John B. Villepigue noted above.

Statesman and financier Bernard M. Baruch (1870–1965), labor leader Lane Kirkland, and baseball player Larry Doby, the first African-American player in the American League, were each born in Kershaw County. Former South Carolina Governor John C. West was also from Kershaw County.[9]

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 740 square miles (1,900 km2), of which 727 square miles (1,880 km2) is land and 14 square miles (36 km2) (1.9%) is water.[10] Kershaw County is one of three counties that compromises Lake Wateree, in which the lake is compromised with the Wateree River, which flows through Kershaw County.

Political DemocraphicsEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

Parks and recreationEdit

National landmarksEdit

Major highwaysEdit

GeologyEdit

In late 2021 and early 2022, southeastern Kershaw County experienced 31 earthquakes, 8 of which exceeded a 2.5 magnitude. Two of the quakes registered at a 3.3 magnitude.[11]

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
18007,340
18109,86734.4%
182012,43226.0%
183013,5459.0%
184012,281−9.3%
185014,47317.8%
186013,086−9.6%
187011,754−10.2%
188021,53883.2%
189022,3613.8%
190024,69610.4%
191027,0949.7%
192029,3988.5%
193032,0709.1%
194032,9132.6%
195032,287−1.9%
196033,5854.0%
197034,7273.4%
198039,01512.3%
199043,59911.7%
200052,64720.8%
201061,69717.2%
202065,4036.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900–1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010–2013[2] 2020[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 52,647 people, 20,188 households, and 14,918 families living in the county. The population density was 72 people per square mile (28/km2). There were 22,683 housing units at an average density of 31 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 71.61% White, 26.29% Black or African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.62% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. 1.68% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 20,188 households, out of which 33.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.80% were married couples living together, 13.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.10% were non-families. 22.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.10% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 28.80% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 12.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $38,804, and the median income for a family was $44,836. Males had a median income of $32,246 versus $22,714 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,360. About 9.70% of families and 12.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.90% of those under age 18 and 14.10% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 61,697 people, 23,928 households, and 17,114 families living in the county.[17] The population density was 84.9 inhabitants per square mile (32.8/km2). There were 27,478 housing units at an average density of 37.8 per square mile (14.6/km2).[18] The racial makeup of the county was 71.3% white, 24.6% black or African American, 0.5% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 1.7% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 3.7% of the population.[17] In terms of ancestry, 28.1% were American, 7.8% were English, 7.7% were Irish, and 6.3% were German.[19]

Of the 23,928 households, 34.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.6% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.5% were non-families, and 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.02. The median age was 40.2 years.[17]

The median income for a household in the county was $44,064 and the median income for a family was $53,053. Males had a median income of $40,794 versus $30,553 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,777. About 12.1% of families and 15.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.6% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.[20]

2020 censusEdit

Kershaw County racial composition[21]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 43,391 66.34%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 15,083 23.06%
Native American 146 0.22%
Asian 417 0.64%
Pacific Islander 29 0.04%
Other/Mixed 2,871 4.39%
Hispanic or Latino 3,466 5.3%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 65,403 people, 24,544 households, and 16,019 families residing in the county.

EducationEdit

The Kershaw County School District serves as the governing body for all public schools in Kershaw County.

Central Carolina Technical College has two branches located in Camden.

Kershaw County is home to Camden Military Academy, the official state military academy of South Carolina. The Montessori School of Camden is a private school located in Camden.

High schoolsEdit

Middle schoolsEdit

  • Camden Middle School
  • Lugoff-Elgin Middle School
  • North Central Middle School
  • Leslie M. Stover Middle School

Elementary schoolsEdit

  • Camden Elementary School
  • Lugoff Elementary School
  • Wateree Elementary School
  • Blaney Elementary School
  • Doby's Mill Elementary School
  • North Central Elementary School
  • Midway Elementary School
  • Pine Tree Hill Elementary School
  • Jackson Elementary School

TransportationEdit

PoliticsEdit

United States presidential election results for Kershaw County, South Carolina[22]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 20,471 60.87% 12,699 37.76% 459 1.36%
2016 17,542 60.50% 10,330 35.63% 1,123 3.87%
2012 16,324 58.41% 11,259 40.29% 363 1.30%
2008 16,466 58.84% 11,226 40.11% 293 1.05%
2004 14,160 61.79% 8,515 37.16% 240 1.05%
2000 11,911 60.53% 7,428 37.75% 338 1.72%
1996 8,513 52.05% 6,764 41.36% 1,077 6.59%
1992 8,499 49.12% 6,585 38.06% 2,217 12.81%
1988 8,877 65.89% 4,494 33.36% 102 0.76%
1984 8,822 66.70% 4,323 32.69% 81 0.61%
1980 6,652 55.55% 5,103 42.62% 219 1.83%
1976 6,126 49.40% 6,211 50.08% 65 0.52%
1972 8,035 74.79% 2,531 23.56% 178 1.66%
1968 4,079 38.56% 2,539 24.00% 3,960 37.44%
1964 5,617 63.94% 3,168 36.06% 0 0.00%
1960 3,465 52.16% 3,178 47.84% 0 0.00%
1956 1,518 28.17% 1,875 34.79% 1,996 37.04%
1952 2,935 58.85% 2,052 41.15% 0 0.00%
1948 49 2.49% 302 15.36% 1,615 82.15%
1944 21 1.07% 1,872 94.98% 78 3.96%
1940 20 1.68% 1,174 98.32% 0 0.00%
1936 20 1.41% 1,400 98.59% 0 0.00%
1932 8 0.76% 1,051 99.24% 0 0.00%
1928 14 1.09% 1,274 98.91% 0 0.00%
1924 1 0.14% 733 99.86% 0 0.00%
1920 42 3.51% 1,156 96.49% 0 0.00%
1916 14 1.39% 989 97.92% 7 0.69%
1912 7 0.95% 708 95.68% 25 3.38%
1904 25 2.86% 850 97.14% 0 0.00%
1900 43 4.51% 910 95.49% 0 0.00%


CommunitiesEdit

CityEdit

TownsEdit

Census-designated placesEdit

Other unincorporated communitiesEdit

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "QuickFacts: Kershaw County, South Carolina". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 7, 2022.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "South Carolina: Individual County Chronologies". South Carolina Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2009. Archived from the original on January 3, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2015.
  5. ^ William Screven: A Journey from English Separatism to the Founding of the First Baptist Church Charleston, South Carolina by Charles B. Aiken
  6. ^ The Frontier in the Colonial South: South Carolina Backcountry, 1736-1800 by George Lloyd Johnson - pg. 9, 16-19, 53, 141, 145, 165, 169
  7. ^ Map of Kershaw District, South Carolina. Authored by Robert Mills (1781–1855) and J. Boykin. Published 1825. Library of Congress, accessed March 2020.
  8. ^ Dixon, Nenie; Elias B. Bull (February 21, 1975). "Bethel Methodist Church (Old Bethel United Methodist Church)" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. Retrieved June 21, 2012.
  9. ^ South Carolina State Library Reference Room
  10. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  11. ^ "Recent Earthquakes". SCDNR Geological Survey. South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved May 10, 2022.
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  14. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  16. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  17. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  18. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  19. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  20. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2016.
  21. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  22. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 13, 2018.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 34°20′N 80°35′W / 34.34°N 80.59°W / 34.34; -80.59