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The Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Literary Prize is an annual British literary prize inaugurated in 1977. It is named after the host Jewish Quarterly and the prize's founder Harold Hyam Wingate.[1] The award recognizes Jewish and non-Jewish writers resident in the UK, British Commonwealth, Europe and Israel who "stimulate an interest in themes of Jewish concern while appealing to the general reader."[2] As of 2011 the winner receives £4,000.[1]

The Jewish Chronicle called it "British Jewry's top literary award,"[3] and Jewish World said it is a "prestigious literature prize."[4]

Contents

WinnersEdit

The blue ribbon   signifies the winner.

1996Edit

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

  •   Theo Richmond, Konin: One Man's Quest for a Vanished Jewish Community (Jonathan Cape)

1997Edit

1998Edit

The shortlists comprised:[5]

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

1999Edit

The shortlists comprised:[5]

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

2000Edit

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

2001Edit

The winners were announced on 30 April 2001. The shortlists comprised:[7]

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

2002Edit

The winners were announced on 2 May 2002. The shortlists comprised:[8]

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

2003Edit

The winners were announced on 8 May 2003. The shortlists comprised:[9]

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

2004Edit

The winners were announced on 6 May 2004. The shortlists comprised:[10]

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

2005Edit

The winners were announced on 17 May 2005.[4][11] The shortlists comprised:[12]

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

2006Edit

The shortlist comprised:[13]

2007Edit

The shortlist was announced on 25 February 2007.[14]

2008Edit

The winner was announced on 5 May 2008. The shortlist comprised:[15]

2009Edit

The shortlist was announced on 31 March 2009. The winner was announced on 6 June 2009.[2]

2010Edit

The shortlist was announced on 22 April 2010.[16] The winner was announced on 16 June 2010.[17]

2011Edit

The shortlist was announced on 4 April 2011.[3] The winner was announced on 6 June 2011.[1]

2012Edit

2013Edit

The winner was announced on 27 February 2013.[19] The shortlist comprised:[20]

2014Edit

The shortlist was announced on 27 November 2013.[21] The winner was announced on 27 February 2014.[22]

2015Edit

The shortlist was announced on 13 January 2015.[23] The winners - one each for fiction and non-fiction, in a departure from recent tradition since 2005 - were announced on 20 April 2015.[24]

FictionEdit

Non-fictionEdit

2016Edit

The short list was announced on 22 February 2016.[25] The winner was announced on 14 March 2016.[26]

2017Edit

The shortlist was announced January 2017.[27] The joint winners were announced 23 February 2017.[28]

2018Edit

The shortlist announced January 2018.[29] The winner was announced in February.[30]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize 2011 Archived 25 February 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ a b Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize 2009
  3. ^ a b Jennifer Lipman (4 April 2011). "Howard Jacobson shortlisted for 'Jewish Booker' prize". The Jewish Chronicle. Retrieved 27 September 2012.
  4. ^ a b Leslie Bunder (4 May 2006). "Holocaust-based novel wins prestigious literary prize". Jewish World. Retrieved 27 September 2012.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Jewish Quarterly Literary Prize Winners 1996 – 2000 inclusive"
  6. ^ "News in Brief:Literary prize withdrawn for writer's 'work of fiction'". The Guardian. 29 April 2000. Retrieved 27 September 2012.
  7. ^ "Wingate Literary Prize 2001"
  8. ^ "Wingate Literary Prize 2002"
  9. ^ "Wingate Literary Prize 2003"
  10. ^ "Wingate Literary Prize 2004"
  11. ^ "Winners of the Jewish Quarterly Wingate Literary Prize for 2005"
  12. ^ "The Quarterly Wingate Literary Prize 2005 Shortlists announcement". Jewish Quarterly. 23 March 2005. Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  13. ^ "Winner of the 2006 Wingate Prize"
  14. ^ "Winner of the 2007 Wingate Literary Prize"
  15. ^ "Winner of the 2008 Wingate Literary Prize"
  16. ^ "JQ-Wingate Literary Prize Shortlist" (Press release). Book Trade. 22 April 2010. Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  17. ^ Alexandra Coghlan (17 June 2010). "Lived resistance: Adina Hoffman wins 2010 JQ-Wingate Prize". The New Statesman. Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  18. ^ "From 2013, the prize will be awarded in February to enable the prize to coincide with Jewish Book Week.""Archived copy". Archived from the original on 5 November 2012. Retrieved 23 January 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) The previous ceremony was in June 2011.
  19. ^ Philip Maughan (28 February 2013). "Shalom Auslander wins 2013 Wingate Prize". The New Statesman. Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  20. ^ Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize 2013 Archived November 5, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  21. ^ "The 2014 Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize Shortlist" (Press release). Book Trade. 27 November 2013. Retrieved 30 November 2013.
  22. ^ Jon Stock (27 February 2014). "Otto Dov Kulka wins Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize 2014". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 28 February 2014.
  23. ^ Josh Jackman (13 January 2015). "Authors from across the globe compete on JQ-Wingate prize shortlist". The Jewish Chronicle.
  24. ^ Jackman, Josh (20 April 2015). "Michel Laub and Thomas Harding win JQ-Wingate Prize for books on the Holocaust". The Jewish Chronicle.
  25. ^ "Howard Jacobson among top authors on Jewish Quarterly's Wingate Prize shortlist". Jewish News. 22 February 2016.
  26. ^ Fisher, Ben (14 March 2016). "Nikolaus Wachsmann Wins Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize". Jewish Quarterly.
  27. ^ Katherine Cowdrey (12 January 2017). "Philippe Sands shortlisted for 2017's Jewish Quarterly Wingate Prize". The Bookseller. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  28. ^ Benedicte Page (23 February 2017). "Sands and Gundar-Goshen win JQ Wingate Literary Prize". The Bookseller. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  29. ^ Alastair Thomas (11 January 2018). "Six authors to compete for JQ Wingate prize". The JC. Retrieved 18 February 2018.
  30. ^ Daniel Sugarman (15 February 2018). "Michael Frank wins JQ Wingate literary prize". The JC. Retrieved 18 February 2018.

External linksEdit