Iconoclastic Caravans for Free Will

The Iconoclastic Caravans for Free Will (Spanish: Caravanas Iconoclastas por el Libre Albedrío, CIPLA) were an anarchist cell active in the Santiago Metropolitan Region, being known for some attacks in the communes of Las Condes and Vitacura. The group gained attention from the authorities for its members being closely investigated during the investigation of the Bombas Case.[1][2]

Iconoclastic Caravans for Free Will
Caravanas Iconoclastas por el Libre Albedrío
Dates of operationAugust 12, 2009 (2009-08-12)–2012 (2012)
Country Chile
Active regionsSantiago Metropolitan Area
IdeologyAnti-patriotism
Anti-authoritarianism
Anti-catholicism
Anti-religion
Illegalism
Individualist anarchism
Insurrectionary anarchism
Political positionPost-left
Notable attacksExplosive attacks
StatusInactive
Allies
Opponents Government of Chile

BackgroundEdit

Since the mid-2000s, the Santiago Metropolitan Area suffered several attacks with low-intensity explosives, including banks (approximately a third of the bombs detonated in national and international banks), police stations, Carabineros and army barracks, churches, embassies, the headquarters of political parties, company offices, courts and government buildings.[3][4] Explosives (commonly made from household materials) included fire extinguishers filled with gunpowder or sometimes with explosives such as ANFO, TNT or TATP. They were transported by a group of two to four people late in the morning, leaving the explosive charge, to detonate minutes later, causing material damage.

The only fatality was a young anarchist, Mauricio Morales, who died on May 22, 2009 by a bomb that detonated prematurely, killing him instantly.[5][6] Since then, several anarchist cells have claimed his death as the date for the beginning of their attacks.[7][8]

AttacksEdit

The CIPLA's first attack was on June 28, 2009, when militants abandoned an explosive device at the Bricrim Chilean Investigations Police headquarters in Ñuñoa, an attack that only caused material damage.[9][10] The following day the group claimed responsibility for the attack, which was linked to the allegations of corruption and alleged actions of police officers in the sexual abuse of minors.[11][12]

On August 12, 2009, two explosives detonated in Santiago, the first at the Sportlife gym in Las Condes, and the other at the Balthus gym on Monseñor Escrivá de Balaguer avenue in Vitacura, both explosions only causing material damage.[13] Days later the Iconoclastic Caravans for Free Will claimed responsibility for the double attack in a statement where it justified its attacks in those areas (those with the highest Human Development Index in Santiago).[14][15][16] Due to the magnitude of damage and the area where the events occurred, this has been the group's most publicized attack.[17] On November 26, 2011, the group released its last statement together with several other cells where they showed solidarity with the arrests and dismantling of some cells belonging to the Conspiracy of Cells of Fire in Greece and how this phenomenon could be replicated in Chile.[18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Informe de inteligencia les "sacó la ficha" a 10 grupos radicales". La Segunda (in Spanish). 23 November 2013. Retrieved 14 April 2021.
  2. ^ "Jean Marc Rouillan Armed and Heartless Columns". Terrorism Research & Analysis Consortium. Retrieved 21 April 2021.
  3. ^ Abujatum, Jana (2019). "Atentados con artefactos explosivos en Santiago desde 2006 a 2019" (PDF). Biblioteca del Congreso Nacional de Chile (in Spanish). Retrieved 2 November 2020.
  4. ^ Saldivia, Carlos (29 November 2009). "LOS ANTECEDENTES INÉDITOS DE LAS INVESTIGACIONES POR LOS ATAQUES CON BOMBA" (PDF). Sigweb/División de Seguridad Privada (in Spanish). Retrieved 2 November 2020.
  5. ^ "Anarquista murió tras explosión de bomba que llevaba en su espalda". El Austral- Diario de la Araucania (in Spanish). 23 May 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2020.
  6. ^ "Mauricio+Morales+Duarte". Emol.tv. Retrieved 2 November 2020.
  7. ^ Zúñiga, Diego (9 September 2014). "¿Quién está tras el atentado en Chile?". Deutsch Well en Español (in Spanish). Retrieved 31 October 2020.
  8. ^ "Anarquistas difundieron homenaje a Mauricio Morales Duarte". Cooperativa.cl (in Spanish). 24 May 2009. Retrieved 29 April 2021.
  9. ^ "Policía indaga explosión en cuartel de la PDI en Ñuñoa". Cooperativa.cl (in Spanish). 28 June 2009. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  10. ^ Iconoclastic Caravans for Free Will (28 June 2009). "Atentado explosivo contra cuartel de la PDI en Santiago, $hile". La Haine/Liberación Total (in Spanish). Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  11. ^ "Explosivo estalla en cuartel de la PDI de Ñuñoa". El Austral de Temuco (in Spanish). 29 June 2009. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  12. ^ "Grupo anarquista se adjudicó atentado contra cuartel de la PDI". ADN Radio (in Spanish). 28 June 2009. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  13. ^ "Grupo anarco se adjudica los dos bombazos a gimnasios del sector oriente". Emol.cl (in Spanish). 12 August 2009. Retrieved 22 January 2020.
  14. ^ "Barrio Alto, Urgente: Grupo anarquista odia los gimnasios finolis y les pone bombas". The Clinic (in Spanish). 12 August 2009. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  15. ^ "Grupo anarquista se atribuye atentados: "Puede haber bombas en cualquier parte"". La Tercera (in Spanish). 12 August 2009. Retrieved 22 January 2020.
  16. ^ Iconoclastic Caravans for Free Will (12 August 2009). "Bombardeamos los barrios de Camino el Alba y Monseñor Escrivá de Balaguer". Cedema (in Spanish). Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  17. ^ "Grupo anarquista se atribuye atentados: "Puede haber bombas en cualquier parte". La Tercera (in Spanish). 12 August 2009. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  18. ^ Iconoclastic Caravans for Free Will; Severino di Giovanni Antipatriot Band; Efraín Plaza Olmedo Dynamite Band (26 November 2011). "Comunicado de grupos anarquistas insurreccionalistas en solidaridad con la CCF desde $hile". La Haine-Liberación Total (in Spanish). Retrieved 15 April 2021.