Howrah–Kharagpur line

The Howrah–Kharagpur line is part of the Howrah–Nagpur–Mumbai line, Howrah–Chennai main line and Kolkata Suburban Railway.

Howrah–Kharagpur line
(including Tamluk-Digha & Tamluk-Haldia branch lines)
KHARAGPUR LOCAL HOWRAH KHARGPUR LINE.jpg
EMU train running on Howrah–Kharagpur line
Overview
StatusOperational
OwnerIndian Railways
LocaleWest Bengal
TerminiHowrah
Kharagpur
Service
ServicesHowrah–Nagpur–Mumbai line and Howrah–Chennai main line, Kolkata Suburban Railway
Operator(s)South Eastern Railway
Depot(s)Tikiapara, Santragachi, Panskura, Kharagpur
History
Opened1900
Technical
Track lengthMain line: 115 km (71 mi)
Branch lines:
Mecheda–Haldia: 81 km (50 mi)
Tamluk–Digha: 94 km (58 mi)
Number of tracks3 (Howrah–Panskura),
3 (Panskura–Kharagpur),
2 (Panskura–Rajgoda)
Track gauge5 ft 6 in (1,676 mm) broad gauge
ElectrificationMain line: 25 kV AC overhead system in 1967–69
Operating speedMain line: up to 160 km/hr
Route map

km
UpperLeft arrow
Left arrow
Right arrow
Nimpura
Nimpura Through Yard
Nimpura Goods Yard
Girimaidan
Hijli
0
Kharagpur
7
Jakpur
13
Madpur
19
Shyam Chak
24
Balichak
27
Duan
30
Radhamohanpur
35
Haur
39
Khirai
km
44
Panskura
Raghunathbari
20
Right arrow
Rajgoda
28
48
Narayan Pakuria Murail
Saheed Matangini
33
51
Bhogpur
Tamluk
36
00
54
Nandaigajan
Nandakumar
10
57
Mecheda
Nandakumar-Balaipanda
new line (planned)
43
Keshabpur
Chak Simulia
49
Satish Samanta Halt
Bargoda
51
Mahishadal
Moyna
60
Barda
Balaipanda
66
Basulya Sutahata
71
Durgachak
Lavan Satyagrah Smarak
21
Deshapran
33
Deshapran-Kendamari
new line (planned)
Gholpukur
74
Durgachak Town
New Krishnanagar
77
Silpaprabesh
Hampigram
Nandigram
Kendamari
Henria
39
Nachinda
52
Kanthi
63
79
Bandar
Sitalpur
69
81
Haldia
Sujalpur
71
Ashapurna Devi
76
Kolaghat Thermal
Power Station
Badalpur
78
60
Kolaghat
Kanthi-Egra new
line (planned)
Raipur
64
Deulti
Satmile
67
Ghoraghata
Paschimbatya
70
Bagnan
Balighai
Right arrow
Egra
Bhatda
78
Kulgachia
Dubda
79
Bir Shibpur
Paniparul Road
Left arrow
Depal
83
Uluberia
Champa River
85
Phuleswar
Ramnagar (Bengal)
86
88
Chengel
Egra-Digha new
line (planned)
Fort Gloster Jute Mill
Tikra
88
91
Bauria
Left arrow
95
Nalpur
Digha
94
Ambuja Cement
97
Abada
Sankrail Goods yard
99
Sankrail
Delta Jute Mill
103
Andul
105
Mourigram
Right arrow
Hindustan Industries
and Engineering
108
Santragachi
Padmapukur
109
Ramrajatala
111
Dasnagar
Shalimar
Shalimar
rail yard
112
Tikiapara
Right arrow
115
Howrah
km
Sources:[1][2][3][4]

GeographyEdit

The line runs through the plains of West Bengal. From Howrah, it is first the Gangetic Plains and then the basins of the Damodar, Rupnarayan and Kangsabati, thereby traversing Howrah, Purba Medinipur and Paschim Medinipur districts.[5][6]

Kolaghat Thermal Power Station, with its six tall chimneys, one for each of the 210 MW units, is a landmark on this line.[7]

Haldia dock complex handled 31.015 million tonnes of traffic in 2011–12.[8] Haldia Refinery, one of the eight operating refineries of Indian Oil Corporation, was commissioned in 1975.[9] Haldia Petrochemicals, a modern naphtha based petrochemical complex and the second largest project of its kind in India, has been a catalyst for the development of a large number of downstream industries.[10]

HistoryEdit

Bengal Nagpur Railway opened to traffic its main line from Nagpur to Asansol in 1891. Sini, on the Nagpur–Asansol line, was connected to Kharagpur and Kolaghat in 1898–99. The Kharagpur-Cuttack section was also opened the same year. The Kolaghat-Howrah track was completed in 1899–1900. Kharagpur was connected to Howrah with the opening of the Rupnarayan bridge on 19 April 1900.[11]

The Panskura–Durgachak line was opened in 1968, at a time when Haldia Port was being constructed. It was subsequently extended to Haldia. Haldia Dock Complex, a part of Kolkata Port Trust, was commissioned in 1977.[11][12]

The Tamluk–Digha line was opened in 2004.[13]

ElectrificationEdit

The Howrah–Kharagpur line was electrified in 1967–69. The Panskura–Haldia line was electrified in 1974–76. Santragachi–Bankaranayabaj sector was electrified in 1984–85. All lines were electrified with 25 kV AC overhead system.[14] EMU train services between Panskura and Haldia introduced in 1976 and direct EMU services between Howrah and Haldia in 1979.[11]

New linesEdit

Indian Railways propose to lay a new line connecting Sealdah and Haldia, with the distance being shorter by 70  km than the Howrah–Haldia track.[15]

There is a plan to connect Digha to Jaleswar on the Kharagpur–Puri line.[16]

The Howrah–Kharagpur stretch has three lines.[17] There is a plan to build a fourth line for the Santragachi–Panskura–Kharagpur stretch.[16]

Car and loco shedsEdit

There are EMU car sheds at Tikiapara (for Howrah), Panskura and Kharagpur. Kharagpur has a diesel loco shed which houses WDM-2, WDM-3A and WDM-3B locos. Nimpura (for Kharagpur) has an electric loco shed. Santragachi has an electric loco shed and also an outstation trip shed. It houses WAP-4 and WAP-7 locos and can take in 50+ locos. Santragachi also has arrangements for rake maintenance. Kharagpur has workshops for loco, carriage and wagon overhaul.[18]

Speed limitsEdit

The main line is classified as a "Group A" line which can take speeds up to 160 km/hr. The branch lines have speed limits within 100 km/hr.[19]

Railway reorganizationEdit

The Bengal Nagpur Railway was nationalized in 1944.[11]Eastern Railway was formed on 14 April 1952 with the portion of East Indian Railway Company east of Mughalsarai and the Bengal Nagpur Railway.[20] In 1955, South Eastern Railway was carved out of Eastern Railway. It comprised lines mostly operated by BNR earlier.[20][21] Amongst the new zones started in April 2003 were East Coast Railway and South East Central Railway. Both these railways were carved out of South Eastern Railway.[20]

Passenger movementEdit

Howrah and Kharagpur on this line, are amongst the top hundred booking stations of Indian Railway.[22]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Google Maps
  2. ^ Kharagpur-Howrah Local 38606 Indiarailinfo
  3. ^ Howrah-Haldia Local 68689 ⇒ 38089 Indiarailinfo
  4. ^ Santragachi-Digha EMU 78001 ⇒ 68687 Indiarailinfo
  5. ^ "Howrah District (1909)". IRFCA. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  6. ^ Guha, Abhijit (2007). Land, Law and the Left: The Saga of Disempowerment of the Peasantry in the Era of Colonisation. page 28. Concept Publishing Company, New Delhi. ISBN 9788180693984. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  7. ^ "Kolaghat Thermal Power Station". The West Bengal Power Development Corporation Limited. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  8. ^ "Cargo Statistics". Kolkata Port Trust. Archived from the original on 5 September 2013. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  9. ^ "Haldia Refinery (near Kolkata, West Bengal)". Indian Oil Corporation. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  10. ^ "Haldia". Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  11. ^ a b c d "Major events in formation of S.E.Railway". South Eastern Railway. Archived from the original on 1 April 2013. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  12. ^ "Haldia" (PDF). Indian Railways. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 January 2013. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  13. ^ "Digha Trip Report". IRFCA. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  14. ^ "History of Electrification". IRFCA. Retrieved 10 February 2013.
  15. ^ "Rail survey on new port route". The Telegraph. 28 June 2011. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  16. ^ a b "Upcoming projects in South Eastern Railway". South Eastern Railway. Archived from the original on 1 April 2013. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  17. ^ "Howrah–Pune AC Duronto Express". India Rail Info. Archived from the original on 18 November 2015. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  18. ^ "Sheds and Workshops". IRFCA. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  19. ^ "Chapter II – The Maintenance of Permanent Way". Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  20. ^ a b c "Geography – Railway Zones". IRFCA. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  21. ^ "IR History: Part - IV (1947 - 1970)". IRFCA. Retrieved 10 April 2013.
  22. ^ "Indian Railways Passenger Reservation Enquiry". Availability in trains for Top 100 Booking Stations of Indian Railways. IRFCA. Archived from the original on 10 May 2014. Retrieved 10 April 2013.

External linksEdit

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