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State Route 14 (SR 14) is a 87.4-mile-long (140.7 km) state highway that travels southwest-to-northeast through portions of Troup, Coweta, and Fulton counties in the west-central and north-central parts of the U.S. state of Georgia. The highway connects the Alabama state line in West Point to Downtown Atlanta, via LaGrange, Fairburn, College Park, and East Point. Except for the northernmost segment, it is entirely concurrent with U.S. Route 29 (US 29).

State Route 14 marker

State Route 14
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length 87.4 mi[2] (140.7 km)
Existed 1919[1] – present
Major junctions
South end US 29 / SR 15 at the Alabama state line in West Point
 
North end SR 154 at Ted Turner Drive, Downtown Atlanta
Location
Counties Troup, Coweta, Fulton
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
SR 13SR 15

Contents

Route descriptionEdit

SR 14 starts at its southern terminus just west of the Chattahoochee River in West Point in Troup County, and travels northeast through LaGrange, paralleling I-85 to the west, and is concurrent with US 29 for almost its entire length, with the exception of a brief distance at its northern terminus. US 29/SR 14 turns slightly north after leaving LaGrange and travels through Hogansville, then turns northeast again, traveling through Grantville, before crossing I-85 and traveling parallel to the interstate on its east side through portions of Coweta County.

The route then travels into Moreland, where it turns slightly northwest, crosses I-85 once more, and heads into Newnan. Turning northeast once more, the route crosses into Fulton County and heads through Palmetto, Fairburn, and Union City, before crossing I-285 west of Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport. SR 14 then continues through East Point, crosses I-20, and arrives at its northern terminus at SR 154 and Ted Turner Drive NW in downtown Atlanta.

There are two sections of SR 14 that are included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility:

HistoryEdit

SR 14 was established at least as early as 1919 on its current path, from West Point to Atlanta.[1] Between September 1921 and October 1926, US 29 was designated on SR 14's entire length. Three segments of the highway had a completed hard surface: a portion in the east-northeast part of West Point, from south-southwest of LaGrange to just southwest of the Troup–Meriwether–Coweta county tripoint, and from Moreland to Atlanta.[4][5] By October 1929, the entire highway had a completed hard surface.[5][6]

Major intersectionsEdit

CountyLocationmikmDestinationsNotes
ChambersLanett0.00.0  US 29 south (SR 15)Continuation into Alabama, southern end of US 29 concurrency
TroupWest Point  SR 18 east (East 10th Street)Western terminus of SR 18
LaGrange  SR 109 west (Roanoke Road)Southern end of SR 109 concurrency
  SR 14 Conn. north (Broad Street)Western terminus of SR 14 Conn.
     US 27 south / SR 1 south / SR 219 south / SR 109 east (Martha Berry Highway)Northern end of SR 109 concurrency; southern end of US 27/SR 1/SR 219 concurrency
  SR 14 Conn. west (Broad Street)Eastern terminus of SR 14 Conn.
    US 27 north / SR 1 north / SR 219 north (Martha Berry Highway)Northern end of US 27/SR 1/SR 219 concurrency
  SR 14 Spur south (Davis Road)Northern terminus of SR 14 Spur
Hogansville   SR 54 / SR 100 south (Main Street)Southern end of SR 100 concurrency
  SR 100 north (Corinth Road)Northern end of SR 100 concurrency
CowetaGrantville  I-85 (SR 403) – Montgomery, AtlantaI-85 exit 35
Moreland   US 27 Alt. south / SR 41 southSouthern end of US 27 Alt. concurrency; northern terminus of SR 41
  I-85 (SR 403) – Montgomery, AtlantaI-85 exit 41
East Newnan  SR 16 eastSouthern end of SR 16 concurrency
Newnan    US 27 Alt. north / SR 16 west / SR 34 (Temple Avenue / Bullsboro Drive)Northern end of SR 16 concurrency
  SR 70 north (Roscoe Road)Southern terminus of SR 70
  SR 34 Byp. (Millard Farmer Industrial Boulevard)
  SR 154 southSouthern end of SR 154 concurrency
FultonPalmetto    SR 154 north / US 29 Alt. north / SR 14 Alt. north (Cascade Palmetto Highway)Northern end of SR 154 concurrency; southern terminus of US 29 Alt. and SR 14 Alt.
Fairburn  SR 74 south (Virlyn B Smith Road, Fairburn Industrial Boulevard)Northern terminus of SR 74
  SR 92 (Campbellton Street)
  SR 138 (Beverly Engram Parkway)
Red Oak    US 29 Alt. south / SR 14 Alt. south / SR 14 Conn. eastNorthern terminus of US 29 Alt. and SR 14 Alt., western terminus of SR 14 Conn.
College Park  SR 279 south (Old National Highway)Northern terminus of SR 279
   SR 6 / SR 139 south (Camp Creek Parkway)Southern end of SR 139 concurrency
East Point   SR 154 west / SR 166 (Arthur B. Langford Jr. Parkway)Southern end of SR 154 concurrency
Atlanta   US 29 north / SR 3 Conn. north (Chapel Street)Northern end of US 29 concurrency; southern terminus of SR 3 Conn.
  SR 154 east (Trinity Avenue) / Ted Turner DriveNorthern terminus; northern end of SR 154 concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Special routesEdit

LaGrange alternate routeEdit

 

State Route 14 Alternate
Location LaGrange
Existed 1965[9][10]–1976[7][8]

State Route 14 Alternate (SR 14 Alt.) was an alternate route of SR 14 that existed entirely within the city limits of LaGrange. Between June 1963 and the beginning of 1966, it was established from US 29/SR 14/SR 109 (Broad Street) east past SR 219 to US 27/SR 1/SR 219 (Hamilton Road; this intersection also served as the western terminus of SR 720) and north on them to US 29/SR 14/SR 219 (Broad Street; this intersection also served as the southern terminus of US 29 Bus./SR 14 Conn.[9][10] Between the beginning of 1974 and the beginning of 1977, the path of US 29/SR 14/SR 109 in the western part of the city was shifted southward, replacing the path of SR 14 Alt.[7][8]

The entire route was in LaGrange, Troup County.

mikmDestinationsNotes
    US 29 / SR 14 / SR 109Western terminus
  SR 219 southSouthbound lanes of SR 219 on one-way pair
     US 27 south / SR 1 south / SR 219 south / SR 720 eastWest end of US 27/SR 1/SR 219 concurrency; northbound lanes of SR 219 on one-way pair; western terminus of SR 720
         US 27 north / US 29 / SR 1 north / SR 14 / SR 109 / SR 219 north / US 29 Bus. north / SR 14 Conn. northEastern terminus; east end of US 27/SR 1/SR 219 concurrency; southern terminus of US 29 Bus./SR 14 Conn.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

LaGrange connector route (1965–1976)Edit

 

State Route 14 Connector
Location LaGrange
Existed 1965[9][10]–1976[7][8]

State Route 14 Connector (SR 14 Conn.) was a connector route of SR 14 that existed entirely within the city limits of LaGrange. Between June 1963 and the beginning of 1966, it was established, concurrent with US 29 Bus., starting at an intersection with US 27/SR 1/SR 14 Alt./SR 219 (Hamilton Road/Franklin Road) and US 29/SR 14/SR 109 (Broad Street/Franklin Road). US 29 Bus./SR 14 Conn. traveled east-northeast on Greenville Street, concurrent with SR 109. Then, they split off of SR 109 and curved to the north-northeast to a second intersection with US 29/SR 14 (Commerce Avenue/Hogansville Road).[9][10] Between the beginning of 1974 and the beginning of 1977, both US 29 Bus. and SR 14 Conn. were decommissioned.[7][8]

The entire route was in LaGrange, Troup County.

mikmDestinationsNotes
         US 27 / SR 1 / SR 14 Alt. west / SR 219 (Hamilton Road/Franklin Road) / US 29 / SR 14 / SR 109 west (Broad Street/Franklin Road) / US 29 Bus. beginsSouthern terminus of US 29 Bus./SR 14 Conn.; western terminus of SR 14 Alt.; south end of US 29 Bus. and SR 109 concurrencies
  SR 109 east (Greenville Street)North end of SR 109 concurrency
    US 29 / SR 14 (Commerce Avenue/Hogansville Road) / US 29 Bus. endsNorthern terminus of US 29 Bus./SR 14 Conn.; north end of US 29 Bus. concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

LaGrange connector routeEdit

 

State Route 14 Connector
Location LaGrange
Length 1.1 mi[11] (1.8 km)
Existed 1994[12][13]–present

State Route 14 Connector (SR 14 Conn.) is a 1.1-mile-long (1.8 km) connector route of SR 14 that exists entirely within the city limits of LaGrange. It is known as Broad Street from its western terminus to West LaFayette Square/Church Street. It is known as North LaFayette Square from there to Main Street. It is known as Greenville Street from that point to its eastern terminus. The western end of the highway serves as the northern and western edge of LaGrange College. Between Waverly Way and Gordon Street, it is also the centerpiece of the Broad Street Historic District,[citation needed] and has a concurrency with SR 219 from Greenwood Street to Morgan Street (US 27/US 29/SR 1/SR 14).

The roadway that would eventually become SR 14 Conn. was established at least as early as 1919 as part of US 29/SR 14.[1] Between September 1921 and October 1926, this segment had a "completed hard surface".[4][5] In 1937, SR 109 was placed on a concurrency with US 29/SR 14.[14][15] In 1994, US 29/SR 14/SR 109 was shifted southward, onto Vernon Street. The former path was redesignated as SR 14 Conn.[12][13]

The entire route is in LaGrange, Troup County.

mi[11]kmDestinationsNotes
0.00.0    US 29 / SR 14 / SR 109 (Vernon Street)Western terminus; no left turn allowed from US 29 north/SR 14 north/SR 109 east to SR 14 Conn.
0.81.3  SR 219 north (Greenwood Street) – FranklinWest end of SR 219 concurrency
1.11.8      US 27 / US 29 / SR 1 / SR 14 / SR 219 south (Morgan Street)Eastern terminus; east end of SR 219 concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

LaGrange spur routeEdit

 

State Route 14 Spur
Location LaGrange
Length 5.0 mi[16] (8.0 km)
Existed 1971[17][18]–present

State Route 14 Spur (SR 14 Spur) is a 5.0-mile-long (8.0 km) spur route of SR 14 in the southeastern part of LaGrange, in Troup County. It connects SR 219 in the southern part of the city with US 29/SR 14 northeast of the city.

It begins at an intersection with SR 219 (Whitesville Road). It curves to a northeasterly direction and intersects US 27/SR 1 (Hamilton Road). Then, it reaches SR 109 (Lafayette Parkway) just over 1 mile (1.6 km) before meeting its northern terminus, an intersection with US 29/SR 14 (Hogansville Road).[16]

SR 14 Spur is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[19]

In 1971, SR 14 Spur was established on its current path.[17][18]

The entire route is in LaGrange, Troup County.

mi[16]kmDestinationsNotes
0.00.0   SR 219 (Whitesville Road) to I-85 – Whitesville, LaGrangeSouthern terminus
0.71.1     US 27 / SR 1 (Hamilton Street) to I-85 / I-185 – Pine Mountain, West Point
3.96.3    SR 109 (LaFayette Parkway) to I-85 / I-185 – LaGrange, Greenville
5.08.0   US 29 / SR 14 (Hogansville Road) – LaGrange, HogansvilleNorthern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Palmetto–Red Oak alternate routeEdit

 

State Route 14 Alternate
Location PalmettoRed Oak
Length 13.7 mi[20] (22.0 km)
Existed 2007[21][22]–present

State Route 14 Alternate (SR 14 Alt.) is a 13.7-mile-long (22.0 km) alternate route of SR 14 that exists entirely within the southern and southeastern parts of Fulton County. It connects Palmetto with Red Oak, located southwest of Atlanta. It is concurrent with US 29 Alt. for its entire length.

It begins at an intersection with US 29/SR 14 (Main Street) in Palmetto. This intersection marks the northern end of US 29/SR 14's concurrency with SR 154, with which US 29 Alt./SR 14 Alt. begins concurrent. The three highways travel north on a nearly due-north direction, until they reach SR 70 (South Fulton Parkway). There, the alternate routes turn to the right, toward Atlanta. The concurrency heads northeast, passing Cedar Grove Lake, and intersects SR 92 (Campbellton–Fairburn Road). They pass South Wind Golf Course and curve to a nearly due-east direction. In Red Oak, they have an interchange with US 29/SR 14 (Roosevelt Highway). Here, both US 29 Alternate/SR 14 Alternate meet their northern terminus, and the roadway continues as SR 14 Conn.[20]

All of SR 14 Alt. is included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[3]

The roadway that would eventually become SR 14 Alt. was proposed in 1992 from SR 154 north-northwest of Palmetto to SR 14 Spur west of Red Oak.[23][24] The next year, this road was completed.[24][12] It wasn't until 2007 that US 29 Alt./SR 14 Alt. was designated on its entire current path.[21][22]

The entire route is in Fulton County.

Locationmi[20]kmDestinationsNotes
Palmetto0.00.0      US 29 / SR 14 / SR 154 west (Roosevelt Highway) / US 29 Alt. begins to I-85 – Newnan, AtlantaSouthern terminus; south end of US 29 Alt. and SR 154 concurrencies
3.65.8   SR 70 (South Fulton Parkway) / SR 154 east (Cascade–Palmetto Highway)North end of SR 154 concurrency; south end of SR 70 concurrency
7.612.2   SR 92 (Campbellton–Fairburn Road) to I-85 south – Union City, Douglasville, Wolf Creek Amphitheater
Red Oak13.321.4  US 29Interchange
13.722.0   US 29 Alt. ends / SR 14 Conn. east – College ParkNorthern terminus; north end of US 29 Alt. concurrency; western terminus of SR 14 Conn.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Red Oak spur routeEdit

 

State Route 14 Spur
Location Red Oak
Existed 1963[25][9]–2007[21][22]

State Route 14 Spur (SR 14 Spur) was a spur route of SR 14 that existed in Red Oak. Between June 1960 and June 1963, it was established from US 29/SR 14 southwest of Red Oak north-northeast and east-southeast to another intersection with US 29/SR 14. Then, it headed in an easterly direction to Interstate 85 (I-85) and north-northwest to US 29/SR 14 east of Red Oak.[25][9] In 2007, it was redesignated as SR 14 Connector.[21][22]

The entire route was in Fulton County.

LocationmikmDestinationsNotes
   US 29 / SR 14Western terminus
Red Oak   US 29 / SR 14
  I-85 (SR 403)
   US 29 / SR 14Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Red Oak–College Park connector routeEdit

 

State Route 14 Connector
Location Red OakCollege Park
Length 2.8 mi[26] (4.5 km)
Existed 2007[21][22]–present

State Route 14 Connector (SR 14 Conn.) is a 2.8-mile-long (4.5 km) connector route of SR 14 in southern Fulton County. Its western terminus is at an interchange with US 29/SR 14 (Roosevelt Highway) in Red Oak, where the roadway continues as US 29 Alt./SR 14 Alt. (South Fulton Parkway), it becomes a state maintained freeway. A short distance later, it enters College Park. At the southwest interchange of I-85 and I-285, it becomes their collector/distributor roads, which continue east through the SR 279 interchange to end at the northeast split of I-85/285.[26]

All of SR 14 Spur is included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[3]

The roadway that would eventually become SR 14 Conn. was established between June 1960 and June 1963, as SR 14 Spur from US 29/SR 14 southwest of Red Oak north-northeast and east-southeast to another intersection with US 29/SR 14. It then traveled easterly to I-85 and then north-northwest to US 29/SR 14 east of Red Oak.[25][9] In 1993, the western terminus was truncated to the middle junction with US 29/SR 14.[24][12] In 2007, it was redesignated as SR 14 Conn.[21][22]

The entire route is in Fulton County.

Locationmi[26]kmDestinationsNotes
Red Oak0.00.0     US 29 / SR 14 / US 29 Alt. south / SR 14 Alt. south – Fairburn, PalmettoWestern terminus; northern terminus of US 29 Alt./SR 14 Alt.
0.81.3Buffington RoadNo access from SR 14 Conn. eastbound to Buffington Road, or from Buffington Road to SR 14 Conn. west
College Park1.11.8  I-85 south (SR 403) – Columbus, MontgomeryExit for southbound lanes of I-85; no ramp for northbound I-85
1.72.7  I-285 north (SR 407) – Birmingham, ChattanoogaExit for northbound lanes of I-85; no ramp for southbound I-285
2.23.5  SR 279 (Old National Highway)
2.84.5    I-85 north (SR 403) / I-285 east (SR 407) / SR 139 (Riverdale Road) – MaconEastern terminus; exit ramps for I-85 northbound and I-285 eastbound, exit 62; no ramps for I-85 southbound or I-285 northbound
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  2. ^ Google (January 6, 2017). "Overview map of SR 14" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 6, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "National Highway System: Atlanta, GA" (PDF). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved January 6, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1926). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  6. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1929). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (1974). General Highway Map: Troup County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  8. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (1977). General Highway Map: Troup County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g State Highway Department of Georgia (1963). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 2, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1963.)
  10. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1966). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  11. ^ a b Google (March 3, 2017). "Overview map of SR 14 Conn." (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved March 3, 2017. 
  12. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (1994). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1994–1995 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  13. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1995). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1995–1996 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  14. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  15. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  16. ^ a b c Google (August 26, 2013). "Overview map of SR 14 Spur" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 
  17. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1971). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  18. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1972). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  19. ^ National Highway System: Georgia (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved January 7, 2017. 
  20. ^ a b c Google (August 26, 2013). "Overview map of SR 14 Alt." (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f Georgia Department of Transportation (2007). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f Georgia Department of Transportation (2008). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  23. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1992). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1992–1993 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  24. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (1993). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1993–1994 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 2, 2017. 
  25. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–1961 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 2, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  26. ^ a b c Google (August 26, 2013). "Overview map of SR 14 Conn." (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 

External linksEdit