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Earl of Onslow, of Onslow in the County of Shropshire and of Clandon Park in the County of Surrey is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1801 for George Onslow, 4th Baron Onslow. The Onslow family descends from Arthur Onslow, who represented Bramber, Sussex and Guildford in the House of Commons. He was the husband of Mary, daughter of Thomas Foote, Lord Mayor of London in 1649, who had been created a Baronet in 1660 (a title which became extinct on his death in 1687). In 1674 Onslow was himself created a Baronet in the Baronetage of England, with the precedence of 1660.

Earl of Onslow
Coronet of a British Earl.svg
Arms of the Earl of Onslow
Arms of Onslow: Argent, a Fess Gules, between six Cornish Choughs proper. Crest: An Eagle Sable, preying on a Partridge proper. Supporters: Dexter: On either side a Falcon close proper, belled Or.
Creation date19 June 1801
Monarch George III
PeeragePeerage of the United Kingdom
First holderGeorge Onslow, 1st Earl of Onslow
Present holderRupert Onslow, 8th Earl of Onslow
Heir presumptiveAnthony Onslow ,Elysia Morgenstern
Subsidiary titlesViscount Cranley
Baron Onslow
Baron Cranley
Baronet ‘of West Clandon’
StatusExtant
MottoFESTINA LENTE
(Be quick without impetuosity)

Onslow was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He was a prominent politician and served as Speaker of the House of Commons from 1708 to 1710 and as Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1713 to 1714. In 1716 he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Baron Onslow, of Onslow in the County of Shropshire and of Clandon Park in the County of Surrey,[1] with remainder, failing male issue of his own, to his uncle Denzil Onslow, and afterwards, to the male heirs of his father. Lord Onslow was succeeded by his son, the second Baron. He sat as Member of Parliament for Gatton, Chichester, Bletchingley and Surrey and served as Lord Lieutenant of Surrey. His son, the third Baron, represented Guildford in Parliament and served as Lord Lieutenant of Surrey. He was heirless on his death in 1776.


Lord Onslow was succeeded according to the special remainder by his cousin and heir male of his grandfather, the fourth Baron. He was the son of Arthur Onslow, Speaker of the House of Commons, elder son of Foot Onslow. He was Member of Parliament for Rye and Surrey and notably served as Treasurer of the Household and as Lord Lieutenant of Surrey. In May 1776, five months before succeeding in the barony of Onslow, he was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain in his own right as Baron Cranley, of Imber Court in the County of Surrey.[2] In 1801 he was further honoured when he was made Viscount Cranley, of Cranley in the County of Surrey, and Earl of Onslow, of Onslow in the County of Shropshire.[3] The latter titles were in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. A grandson, André George Louis Onslow (1784–1853), was a noted composer, author of thirty string quartets and other works.

His son, the second Earl, represented Rye and Guildford in the House of Commons. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the third Earl. He died without surviving male issue and was succeeded by his great-nephew, the fourth Earl. He was the son George Augustus Cranley Onslow, son of the Hon. Thomas Cranley Onslow, second son of the second Earl. Lord Onslow was a prominent Conservative politician and served as Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies, as Under-Secretary of State for India and as President of the Board of Agriculture and was also Governor of New Zealand. His eldest son, the fifth Earl, was also a Conservative politician. He notably held office as Under-Secretary of State for War and as Paymaster-General during the 1920s.

He was succeeded by his son, the sixth Earl. He served in the Conservative administrations of Winston Churchill, Anthony Eden and Harold Macmillan as Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard (Deputy Chief Whip in the House of Lords) for nine years. From 1971 to 2011, the titles were held by his son, the seventh Earl, who succeeded in 1971. The 7th Earl was one of the ninety elected hereditary peers who remained in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999, and sat like his ancestors on the Conservative benches. He is the only hereditary peer to have appeared as a panellist on Have I Got News For You. Upon his death on 14 May 2011,[4] he was succeeded by his son, now the 8th Earl who inherited Clandon Park, the 1000 acre agricultural Parkland Estate in Surrey in January 2017.

Another member of the Onslow family was the Conservative politician Cranley Onslow, Baron Onslow of Woking. He was a descendant of George Onslow, eldest son of Lieutenant-General Richard Onslow, nephew of the first Baron and uncle of the first Earl. Also, Admiral Sir Richard Onslow, 1st Baronet, was the second son of Lieutenant-General Richard Onslow. See Onslow Baronets of Althain for more information on this branch of the family.

The Earls of Onslow's family seat is Clandon Park in Surrey which is the Grade II private agricultural parkland Estate consisting of 1000 acres that was inherited in January 2017 and is now owned and managed by the 8th Earl of Onslow. He married Leigh Jones-Fenleigh, at Oakham on 10th September 1999 and they have one daughter. Clandon House does not form part of their agricultural holding at Clandon Park.

The family's coat of arms is: Argent a fess gules between six Cornish choughs proper. The supporters are two falcons, proper, belled or. The crest is made up of an eagle sable preying on a partridge or. The motto is "FESTINA LENTE" (Latin: Make haste slowly), although "SEMPER FIDELIS" (Always faithful) is also used.[5]

Contents

Onslow Baronets (1674)Edit

Barons Onslow (1716)Edit

Title passing from father to son, except where noted.

Earls of Onslow (1801)Edit

Title passing from father to son, except where noted.

The heir presumptive for the title is his father's 4th cousin, Anthony Ernest Edward Onslow (born 1955), a descendant of the 2nd Earl.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "No. 5445". The London Gazette. 26 June 1716. pp. 1–2.
  2. ^ "No. 11665". The London Gazette. 11 May 1776. p. 2.
  3. ^ "No. 15375". The London Gazette. 13 June 1801. p. 659.
  4. ^ BBC News — Earl of Onslow dies
  5. ^ Townend, Peter, ed. (1963). Burke's Peerage (103rd Edition). Burke's Peerage Limited. p. 1865.

ReferencesEdit