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Douglas County is a county in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Nevada. As of the 2010 census, the population was 46,997.[1] Its county seat is Minden.[2]

Douglas County, Nevada
County
Douglas County
Douglas County Courthouse, Minden, Nevada.jpg
Douglas County Courthouse in Minden
Map of Nevada highlighting Douglas County
Location in the U.S. state of Nevada
Map of the United States highlighting Nevada
Nevada's location in the U.S.
Founded 1861
Named for Stephen A. Douglas
Seat Minden
Largest city Gardnerville Ranchos
Area
 • Total 738 sq mi (1,911 km2)
 • Land 710 sq mi (1,839 km2)
 • Water 28 sq mi (73 km2), 3.8%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 47,710
 • Density 66/sq mi (25/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Pacific: UTC-8/-7
Website douglascountynv.gov

Douglas County comprises the Gardnerville Ranchos, NV Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Reno-Carson City-Fernley, NV Combined Statistical Area.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Douglas County holds the first permanent settlement in Nevada. The town of Genoa was settled in 1851 by Mormon traders selling goods to settlers on their way to California. Named for Stephen A. Douglas,[3] famous for his 1860 Presidential campaign and debates with Abraham Lincoln, Douglas County was one of the first nine counties formed in 1861 by the Nevada territorial legislature.

Law and governmentEdit

Presidential Elections Results[4]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 62.5% 17,415 30.3% 8,454 7.2% 2,016
2012 62.4% 16,276 35.7% 9,297 1.9% 502
2008 56.6% 14,648 41.2% 10,672 2.3% 584
2004 63.6% 15,192 34.6% 8,275 1.8% 431
2000 62.3% 11,193 32.5% 5,837 5.3% 944
1996 54.8% 8,828 31.7% 5,109 13.4% 2,163
1992 40.8% 6,182 25.9% 3,928 33.3% 5,035
1988 67.0% 7,074 29.4% 3,107 3.5% 374
1984 75.6% 6,385 22.2% 1,877 2.2% 187
1980 71.6% 5,254 18.4% 1,352 10.0% 737
1976 58.6% 3,095 36.6% 1,934 4.8% 253
1972 74.7% 2,898 25.3% 983
1968 64.4% 1,801 24.0% 670 11.7% 327
1964 52.7% 1,127 47.3% 1,010
1960 66.5% 1,164 33.5% 587
1956 80.6% 1,063 19.4% 256
1952 84.3% 948 15.7% 177
1948 69.7% 719 28.9% 298 1.5% 15
1944 66.4% 556 33.7% 282
1940 64.2% 592 35.8% 330
1936 42.6% 346 57.4% 466
1932 45.4% 331 54.6% 398
1928 71.0% 456 29.0% 186
1924 59.0% 343 16.4% 95 24.6% 143
1920 76.7% 503 22.4% 147 0.9% 6
1916 48.7% 337 43.5% 301 7.8% 54
1912 19.2% 80 34.3% 143 46.5% 194
1908 54.7% 229 41.3% 173 4.1% 17
1904 68.6% 262 29.3% 112 2.1% 8

The county seat is Minden, after having been moved from Genoa in 1915.

Various services run by the county include parks, law enforcement, road maintenance, building inspection, and the Minden-Tahoe Airport.

Fire protection and emergency medical services are provided by the Tahoe-Douglas Fire Protection District at the lake and the East Fork Fire Protection District for the rest of the county.

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 738 square miles (1,910 km2), of which 710 square miles (1,800 km2) is land and 28 square miles (73 km2) (3.8%) is water.[5] It is the second-smallest county in Nevada by area. The highest point is East Peak at 9,593 ft (2,924 m), while the most topographically prominent mountain is Mount Siegel.

Douglas County is in western Nevada in the western United States. Stretching from Carson Valley and running up into the Sierra Nevada, the county is bordered on the west by California, and contains about 13.2% of Lake Tahoe, which is split across the two states. Carson City, the state capital, lies to the north, and Lyon County to the east.

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent counties and cityEdit

National protected areaEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1870 1,215
1880 1,581 30.1%
1890 1,551 −1.9%
1900 1,534 −1.1%
1910 1,895 23.5%
1920 1,825 −3.7%
1930 1,840 0.8%
1940 2,056 11.7%
1950 2,029 −1.3%
1960 3,481 71.6%
1970 6,882 97.7%
1980 19,421 182.2%
1990 27,637 42.3%
2000 41,259 49.3%
2010 46,997 13.9%
Est. 2016 48,020 [6] 2.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2013[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 41,259 people, 16,401 households, and 11,890 families residing in the county. The population density was 58 people per square mile (22/km²). There were 19,006 housing units at an average density of 27 per square mile (10/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 91.88% White, 0.31% Black or African American, 1.68% Native American, 1.25% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 2.54% from other races, and 2.19% from two or more races. 7.41% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 16,401 households out of which 30.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.50% were married couples living together, 8.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.50% were non-families. 20.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.00% under the age of 18, 5.50% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 28.90% from 45 to 64, and 15.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 102.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $51,849, and the median income for a family was $57,092. Males had a median income of $40,436 versus $28,762 for females. The per capita income for the county was $27,288. About 5.80% of families and 7.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.70% of those under age 18 and 5.30% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 46,997 people, 19,638 households, and 13,519 families residing in the county.[12] The population density was 66.2 inhabitants per square mile (25.6/km2). There were 23,671 housing units at an average density of 33.4 per square mile (12.9/km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 89.6% white, 1.9% American Indian, 1.5% Asian, 0.4% black or African American, 0.1% Pacific islander, 3.2% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 10.9% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 25.7% were German, 17.5% were English, 14.9% were Irish, 8.0% were Italian, and 4.1% were American.[14]

Of the 19,638 households, 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.5% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.2% were non-families, and 24.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.80. The median age was 47.4 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $60,721 and the median income for a family was $73,543. Males had a median income of $52,001 versus $39,825 for females. The per capita income for the county was $35,239. About 5.4% of families and 7.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.8% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.[15]

EconomyEdit

EducationEdit

Douglas County's education is managed by the Douglas County School District. It serves for all of Douglas County, having two main areas: Lake Tahoe & the Carson Valley. Douglas High School also serves most of the high school age students from Alpine County, California

Lake TahoeEdit

Carson ValleyEdit

  • Douglas High School
  • Carson Valley Middle School
  • Pau-Wa-Lu Middle School
  • Gardnerville Elementary School
  • Minden Elementary School
  • Jacks Valley Elementary School
  • Piñion Hills Elementary School
  • Gene L. Scarselli Elementary School
  • C.C. Meneley Elementary School

Private schoolsEdit

  • Sierra Lutheran High School
  • Faith Christian Academy
  • Grace Christian Academy

MediaEdit

CommunitiesEdit

In popular cultureEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 23, 2013. 
  2. ^ "County Explorer". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 108. Retrieved 2016-01-01. 
  4. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved December 20, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved December 20, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 20, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 20, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 20, 2014. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 

External linksEdit