The Chevron Championship is a professional women's golf tournament. An event on the LPGA Tour, it is one of the tour's five major championships, and has traditionally been the first of the season since its elevation to major status in 1983. Founded in 1972 by singer and actress Dinah Shore and Colgate-Palmolive chairman David Foster, it was played at the Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage, California from its inception through 2022. In 2023, the championship was played in The Woodlands, Texas for the first time at The Club at Carlton Woods - Jack Nicklaus Signature Course.

The Chevron Championship
Tournament information
LocationThe Woodlands, Texas
Established
Course(s)The Club at Carlton Woods
Jack Nicklaus Signature Course
Par72
Organized by
Tour(s)LPGA Tour
FormatStroke play - 72 holes
Prize fundUS$5.1 million
Month playedApril
Tournament record score
Aggregate269 Dottie Pepper (1999)
To par−19 Dottie Pepper (1999)
Current champion
United States Lilia Vu
2023 Chevron Championship

Sometimes referred to as The Dinah Shore in deference to its founder, the tournament has had many official sponsored titles, all of which included Shore's name until 2000; since then it has been titled as the Nabisco Championship, Kraft Nabisco Championship, and ANA Inspiration.

The championship's time at Mission Hills is associated with several traditions; in 1988, Amy Alcott established a tradition of the event's champion diving into the pond that surrounds the 18th hole, while an annual women's festival coinciding with the championship has been held since 1991, attracting a large number of female tourists to the Rancho Mirage area for the events annually. In 2022, the championship was held in Mission Hills for the final time; as part of its new title sponsorship agreement with Chevron Corporation, the championship will be moved to a new venue in 2023, the Jack Nicklaus Signature Course at The Club at Carlton Woods to coincide with the company's move to the Greater Houston area.[1]

History edit

Founded in 1972 by Colgate-Palmolive chairman David Foster,[2][3] and entertainer Dinah Shore,[4] the championship has been classified as a major since 1983.[5] Since its inception, it has been held annually at the Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage, California, southeast of Palm Springs.[4] It is the first major of the year, usually played in late March or early April.

At its debut in 1972 as a 54-hole event, it was the richest event in women's golf;[4][6][7] its purse was more than double that of the LPGA Championship or the U.S. Women's Open. The first edition invited all winners of tour events from the previous ten seasons.[4]

After over twenty years of sponsorship by Nabisco, and parent company Kraft Foods, Japanese airline All Nippon Airways became the title sponsor of the tournament in late 2014, renaming the tournament the ANA Inspiration (in reference to its slogan "Inspiration of Japan").[8]

In October 2021, a six-year sponsorship agreement with energy company Chevron Corporation was announced that would see the tournament renamed The Chevron Championship, with an increased prize fund of $5 million in 2022, up from $3 million in 2021. It was also announced that the tournament will be moved to the Jack Nicklaus Signature Course at The Club at Carlton Woods in the Greater Houston area in 2023, with a change of dates. Dinah Shore's daughter Melissa Montgomery established an advisory board to oversee the tournament's transition.[9][10]

Officials intend the date change to allow for network television coverage on NBC,[9][10] it has also been suggested that the tournament was moved in deference to the Augusta National Women's Amateur.[11]

Tournament names edit

Years Tournament name
1972–1980 Colgate-Dinah Shore Winner's Circle
1981 Colgate-Dinah Shore
1982 Nabisco Dinah Shore Invitational
1983–1999 Nabisco Dinah Shore
2000–2001 Nabisco Championship
2002–2014 Kraft Nabisco Championship
2015–2021 ANA Inspiration
from 2022 The Chevron Championship
Informally, it is commonly referred to as "the Dinah Shore,"
even though her name was removed from the official title in 2000.
The winner's trophy bears Shore's name.

"Poppie's Pond" edit

From 1988 to 2022, the winner traditionally celebrated her victory by jumping in the pond surrounding the 18th green.[12] The pond is known as Champions Lake or "Poppie's Pond" as it was dubbed in 2006 honor of Terry Wilcox, the tournament director from 1994 through 2008; Wilcox is known as "Poppie" to his grandchildren.[13]

Amy Alcott established the tradition in 1988 to celebrate her second win here,[14] and repeated in 1991, including tournament host Dinah Shore.[15] It was not embraced by others until 1994, when Donna Andrews made the leap, followed by Nanci Bowen the next year, and it became an annual tradition.[16][17] In 1998, winner Pat Hurst waded in only up to her knees, as she could not swim.[18][19][20][21]

Originally a very natural water hazard, the portion near the bridge it is now lined with concrete and has treated water, more like a swimming pool.

With the tournament's new home in The Woodlands, Texas in 2023, the traditional leap into the pond by the winner still remained.

Associated events edit

A women's festival known as the Club Skirts Dinah Shore Weekend has been held in the city of Palm Springs, California during the week of the tournament, featuring concerts by female musicians, comedy shows, parties, and other events and networking opportunities. The Dinah Shore Weekend was first organized in 1991 by promoter Mariah Hanson, expanding upon afterparties that had become associated with the tournament.[22][23]

A large number of lesbians and bisexual women visit the Palm Springs area for the festival and tournament;[22][23] the Dinah Shore Weekend was described by Los Angeles as the "largest annual gathering of queer women and their female allies",[24] while the tournament as a whole had been described as "spring break for lesbians."[25][26]

Winners edit

Year Dates Champion Country Score To par Margin
of victory
Purse
($)
Winner's
share ($)
2023 Apr 20–23 Lilia Vu   United States 68-69-73-68 278 −10 Playoff 5,100,000 765,000
2022 Mar 31 – Apr 3 Jennifer Kupcho   United States 66-70-64-74 274 −14 2 strokes 5,000,000 750,000
2021 Apr 1–4 Patty Tavatanakit   Thailand 66-69-67-68 270 −18 2 strokes 3,100,000 465,000
2020 Sep 10–13 Mirim Lee   South Korea 70-65-71-67 273 −15 Playoff 3,100,000 465,000
2019 Apr 4–7 Ko Jin-young   South Korea 69-71-68-70 278 −10 3 strokes 3,000,000 450,000
2018 Mar 29 – Apr 2 ^ Pernilla Lindberg   Sweden 65-67-70-71 273 −15 Playoff 2,800,000 420,000
2017 Mar 30 – Apr 2 Ryu So-yeon   South Korea 68-69-69-68 274 −14 Playoff 2,700,000 405,000
2016 Mar 31 – Apr 3 Lydia Ko   New Zealand 70-68-69-69 276 −12 1 stroke 2,600,000 390,000
2015 Apr 2–5 Brittany Lincicome (2)   United States 72-68-70-69 279 −9 Playoff 2,500,000 375,000
2014 Apr 3–6 Lexi Thompson   United States 73-64-69-68 274 −14 3 strokes 2,000,000 300,000
2013 Apr 4–7 Inbee Park   South Korea 70-67-67-69 273 −15 4 strokes 2,000,000 300,000
2012 Mar 29 – Apr 1 Sun-Young Yoo   South Korea 69-69-72-69 279 −9 Playoff 2,000,000 300,000
2011 Mar 31 – Apr 3 Stacy Lewis   United States 66-69-71-69 275 −13 3 strokes 2,000,000 300,000
2010 Apr 1–4 Yani Tseng   Taiwan 69-71-67-68 275 −13 1 stroke 2,000,000 300,000
2009 Apr 2–5 Brittany Lincicome   United States 66-74-70-69 279 −9 1 stroke 2,000,000 300,000
2008 Apr 3–6 Lorena Ochoa   Mexico 68-71-71-67 277 −11 5 strokes 2,000,000 300,000
2007 Mar 29 – Apr 1 Morgan Pressel   United States 74-72-70-69 285 −3 1 stroke 2,000,000 300,000
2006 Mar 30 – Apr 2 Karrie Webb (2)   Australia 70-68-76-65 279 −9 Playoff 1,800,000 270,000
2005 Mar 24–27 Annika Sörenstam (3)   Sweden 70-69-66-68 273 −15 8 strokes 1,800,000 270,000
2004 Mar 25–28 Grace Park   South Korea 72-69-67-69 277 −11 1 stroke 1,600,000 240,000
2003 Mar 27–30 Patricia Meunier-Lebouc   France 70-68-70-73 281 −7 1 stroke 1,600,000 240,000
2002 Mar 28–31 Annika Sörenstam (2)   Sweden 70-71-71-68 280 −8 1 stroke 1,500,000 225,000
2001 Mar 22–25 Annika Sörenstam   Sweden 72-70-70-69 281 −7 3 strokes 1,500,000 225,000
2000 Mar 23–26 Karrie Webb   Australia 67-70-67-70 274 −14 10 strokes 1,250,000 187,500
1999 Mar 25–28 Dottie Pepper (2)   United States 70-66-67-66 269 −19 6 strokes 1,000,000 150,000
1998 Mar 26–29 Pat Hurst   United States 68-72-70-71 281 −7 1 stroke 1,000,000 150,000
1997 Mar 27–30 Betsy King (3)   United States 71-67-67-71 276 −12 2 strokes 900,000 135,000
1996 Mar 28–31 Patty Sheehan   United States 71-72-67-71 281 −7 1 stroke 900,000 135,000
1995 Mar 23–26 Nanci Bowen   United States 69-75-71-70 285 −3 1 stroke 850,000 127,500
1994 Mar 24–27 Donna Andrews   United States 70-69-67-70 276 −12 2 strokes 700,000 105,000
1993 Mar 25–28 Helen Alfredsson   Sweden 69-71-72-72 284 −4 2 strokes 700,000 105,000
1992 Mar 26–29 Dottie Mochrie   United States 69-71-70-69 279 −9 Playoff 700,000 105,000
1991 Mar 28–31 Amy Alcott (3)   United States 67-70-68-68 273 −15 8 strokes 600,000 90,000
1990 Mar 29 – Apr 1 Betsy King (2)   United States 69-70-69-75 283 −5 2 strokes 600,000 90,000
1989 Mar 30 – Apr 2 Juli Inkster (2)   United States 66-69-73-71 279 −9 5 strokes 500,000 80,000
1988 Mar 31 – Apr 3 Amy Alcott (2)   United States 71-66-66-71 274 −14 2 strokes 500,000 80,000
1987 Apr 2–5 Betsy King   United States 68-75-72-68 283 −5 Playoff 500,000 80,000
1986 Apr 3–6 Pat Bradley   United States 68-72-69-71 280 −8 2 strokes 430,000 75,000
1985 Apr 4–7 Alice Miller   United States 70-68-70-67 275 −13 3 strokes 400,000 55,000
1984 Apr 5–8 Juli Inkster   United States 70-73-69-68 280 −8 Playoff 400,000 55,000
1983 Mar 31 – Apr 3 Amy Alcott   United States 70-70-70-72 282 −6 2 strokes 400,000 55,000

^ Play extended one day due to darkness.
Note: Green highlight indicates scoring records.

Winners as a non-major edit

Year Champion Country Score To par Margin
of victory
Purse
($)
Winner's
share ($)
1982 Sally Little   South Africa 76-67-71-64 278 −10 3 strokes 300,000 45,000
1981 Nancy Lopez   United States 71-73-69-64 277 −11 2 strokes 250,000 37,500
1980 Donna Caponi   United States 71-67-66-71 275 −13 2 strokes 250,000 37,500
1979 Sandra Post (2)   Canada 68-70-68-70 276 −12 1 stroke 250,000 37,500
1978 Sandra Post   Canada 65-75-72-72 283 −5 Playoff 240,000 36,000
1977 Kathy Whitworth   United States 76-70-72-71 289 +1 1 stroke 240,000 36,000
1976 Judy Rankin   United States 74-72-71-68 285 −3 3 strokes 185,000 32,000
1975 Sandra Palmer   United States 70-70-70-73 283 −5 1 stroke 180,000 32,000
1974 Jo Ann Prentice   United States 71-71-74-73 289 +1 Playoff 179,000 32,000
1973 Mickey Wright   United States 71-74-71-68 284 −4 2 strokes 135,000 25,000
1972 Jane Blalock   United States 71-70-72 213 −3 3 strokes 110,000 20,050

Multiple champions edit

Multiple winners of the event as a major championship.

Champion Country Total Years
Amy Alcott   United States 3 1983, 1988, 1991
Betsy King   United States 3 1987, 1990, 1997
Annika Sörenstam   Sweden 3 2001, 2002, 2005
Juli Inkster   United States 2 1984, 1989
Dottie Pepper   United States 2 1992, 1999
Karrie Webb   Australia 2 2000, 2006
Brittany Lincicome   United States 2 2009, 2015
Career Grand Slam winners ‡

Through 2018, the only successful defense of the title (as a major) was by Sörenstam in 2002.[27]

References edit

  1. ^ "The Chevron Championship Embarks on New Era at the Club at Carlton Woods". The Chevron Championship. June 7, 2022. Retrieved June 20, 2022.
  2. ^ McDermott, Barry (April 29, 1974). "One for the money, two for the show". Sports Illustrated. p. 26.
  3. ^ Pileggi, Sarah (April 12, 1982). "The way to win a lot with a Little". Sports Illustrated. p. 32.
  4. ^ a b c d McDermott, Barry (April 24, 1972). "Bracing for a rich breakthrough". Sports Illustrated. p. 26.
  5. ^ McDermott, Barry (April 11, 1983). "Winning was her just dessert". Sports Illustrated. p. 34.
  6. ^ "Rankin maintains lead". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). wire services. April 16, 1972. p. 3C.
  7. ^ "Blalock wins title despite back pain". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. April 17, 1972. p. 5B.
  8. ^ "All Nippon Airways (ANA) Takes Flight as Title Sponsor of LPGA's "ANA Inspiration"". IMG. November 18, 2014. Archived from the original on December 1, 2014. Retrieved November 19, 2014.
  9. ^ a b Levins, Keely (October 5, 2021). "LPGA Tour making major changes to year's first major, with new name, purse, course and sponsor". Golf Digest. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  10. ^ a b Murray, Ewan (October 5, 2021). "Women's golf major gains sponsor and bigger purse amid venue uncertainty". The Guardian. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  11. ^ Powers, Shad (April 2, 2022). "Veteran Christina Kim has harsh words for Augusta National as LPGA major is forced to move". The Desert Sun. Retrieved April 5, 2022.
  12. ^ "LPGA Top Ten: Leaps into Poppie's Pond". YouTube. (LPGA Tour). 2015. Archived from the original on December 12, 2021. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  13. ^ "Poppie's Pond". The Chevron Championship. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  14. ^ "Alcott takes Dinah Shore, then takes victory plunge". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. April 4, 1988. p. 2C.
  15. ^ Florence, Mal (April 1, 1991). "Alcott repeats her win and her dive". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). (Los Angeles Times). p. 2C.
  16. ^ "Bowen's first LPGA victory a major one". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. March 27, 1995. p. 2B.
  17. ^ Crouse, Karen (April 2, 2011). "At women's Masters, plunge in Poppie's Pond is victory lap". New York Times. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  18. ^ "Win has Hurst taking a plunge". Reading Eagle. (Pennsylvania). wire services. March 30, 1998. p. B10.
  19. ^ Shipnuck, Alan (April 6, 1998). "Hurst in a burst". Sports Illustrated. p. G38.
  20. ^ Zullo, Allan (2001). Astonishing but True Golf Facts. Andrews McMeel Publishing. ISBN 978-0740714269.
  21. ^ "The Ladies of the Lake: the Champion's Leap at the Kraft Nabisco Championship". Kraft Nabisco Championship. 2006. Archived from the original on April 1, 2007. Retrieved April 2, 2007.
  22. ^ a b Mansfield, Stephanie (April 7, 1997). "Major party". Sports Illustrated. p. G6.
  23. ^ a b "Tee party". The Observer. May 6, 2001. Archived from the original on May 24, 2013. Retrieved April 3, 2013.
  24. ^ Martin, Brittany (March 12, 2018). "How a Small Party in the Desert Became the Biggest Lesbian Festival in America Los Angeles Magazine". Los Angeles Magazine. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  25. ^ "Don't Quote Me: Dinah Shore Weekend". AfterEllen.com. 2006. Archived from the original on July 19, 2012. Retrieved December 12, 2007.
  26. ^ Hall, Carla (March 31, 1996). "Dinah Shore Week: It's Ultimate Girls' Night Out". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  27. ^ "Sorenstam holds on for victory". Wilmington Morning Star. (North Carolina). Associated Press. April 1, 2002. p. 5C.
  28. ^ "Lopez succumbs to challenge by Post". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press. April 9, 1979. p. 14.

External links edit

33°47′53″N 116°25′59″W / 33.798°N 116.433°W / 33.798; -116.433