Charles Flanagan

  (Redirected from Charlie Flanagan)

Charlie Flanagan (born 1 November 1956) is an Irish Fine Gael politician who has been a Teachta Dála (TD) for the Laois–Offaly constituency since 2020, and previously from 1987 to 2002, 2007 to 2016 and from 2016 to 2020 for the Laois constituency. He was appointed Chair of the Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence in September 2020. He previously served as Minister for Justice and Equality from 2017 to 2020, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade from 2014 to 2017, Minister for Children and Youth Affairs from May to July 2014 and Chair of the Fine Gael Parliamentary Party from 2011 to 2014.[1]

Charles Flanagan
Charlie Flanagan 2014.jpg
Chair of the Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence
Assumed office
15 September 2020
Preceded byBrendan Smith
Minister for Justice and Equality
In office
14 June 2017 – 27 June 2020
TaoiseachLeo Varadkar
Preceded byFrances Fitzgerald
Succeeded byHelen McEntee
(Justice)
Roderic O'Gorman
(Equality)
Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade
In office
11 July 2014 – 14 June 2017
TaoiseachEnda Kenny
Preceded byEamon Gilmore
Succeeded bySimon Coveney
Minister for Children and Youth Affairs
In office
8 May 2014 – 11 July 2014
TaoiseachEnda Kenny
Preceded byFrances Fitzgerald
Succeeded byJames Reilly
Chairman of the Fine Gael Parliamentary Party
In office
9 March 2011 – 8 May 2014
LeaderEnda Kenny
Preceded byPádraic McCormack
Succeeded byDan Neville
Teachta Dála
Assumed office
February 2020
In office
May 2007 – February 2016
In office
February 1987 – May 2002
ConstituencyLaois–Offaly
In office
February 2016 – February 2020
ConstituencyLaois
Personal details
Born
Charles Flanagan

(1956-11-01) 1 November 1956 (age 65)
Mountmellick, County Laois, Ireland
NationalityIrish
Political partyFine Gael
Spouse(s)Mary Flanagan (m. 1994)
RelationsOliver J. Flanagan (Father)
Children2
Alma materUniversity College Dublin

Personal lifeEdit

His father was Oliver J. Flanagan, an Irish Fine Gael politician who served as Minister for Defence in the late 1970s. Flanagan is married and has two daughters.[2]

CareerEdit

Flanagan was first elected to Dáil Éireann at the 1987 general election, succeeding his father Oliver J. Flanagan. He retained his seat at each election until losing it at the 2002 general election, but regained it at the 2007 general election.[3] He was a member of Laois County Council from 1985 until he stepped down in 2004. He was party Spokesperson on Justice, Equality and Law Reform from 2007 to 2010, and was the party Spokesperson on Children from 2010 to 2011.[4]

He was Chairman of the Fine Gael Parliamentary Party from June 2011 to May 2014.[5]

On 7 May 2014, following the resignation of Alan Shatter as Minister for Justice and Minister for Defence, Flanagan was appointed the following day as Minister for Children and Youth Affairs to succeed Frances Fitzgerald, who assumed the Justice portfolio. On 11 July 2014, Flanagan was appointed as Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, succeeding the former Labour leader Eamon Gilmore.[6]

Upon the appointment of Leo Varadkar as Taoiseach on 14 June 2017, Flanagan was appointed as Minister for Justice and Equality.[7] He campaigned in favour of a Yes vote in the 2018 Irish abortion referendum.[8] Flanagan was replaced as Minister for Justice by Helen McEntee on the election of Micheál Martin as Taoiseach on 27 June 2020.[9]

British forces commemorationEdit

As Minister for Justice in 2020, Flanagan was behind plans for a state commemoration of the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC), the police force in Ireland while it was under British rule. This drew widespread criticism from politicians and the public, largely due to the RIC's role in suppressing Irish independence movements, and atrocities by the Black and Tans during the War of Independence.[10] A member of the government-appointed advisory group said they had "recommended a simple ceremony in Dublin Castle, but somebody lost the run of themselves and called it a State event".[10] The backlash forced Flanagan to defer the commemoration, but he committed to holding another in future.[11]

Flanagan supported a memorial wall in Glasnevin Cemetery that drew controversy for commemorating British soldiers alongside Irish revolutionaries. He condemned the decision to take down the wall as a "victory for bullies".[12] Flanagan has also defended his wearing of the remembrance poppy, a historically controversial emblem in Ireland, calling it an "international symbol of remembrance".[13]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Charles Flanagan". Oireachtas Members Database. Archived from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 5 June 2009.
  2. ^ McGee, Harry; Kelly, Fiach. "Profile: Minister for Children Charlie Flanagan". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 31 October 2020. Retrieved 15 July 2019.
  3. ^ "Charles Flanagan". ElectionsIreland.org. Archived from the original on 12 June 2018. Retrieved 5 June 2009.
  4. ^ "Bruton & Noonan return to Fine Gael frontbench". RTÉ News. 1 July 2010. Archived from the original on 4 July 2010. Retrieved 3 July 2010.
  5. ^ "Dan Neville elected as Fine Gael party chairman". The Irish Times. 14 May 2014. Archived from the original on 14 May 2014. Retrieved 14 May 2014.
  6. ^ "Nomination of Members of the Government: Motion | Friday, 11 July 2014". Oireachtas. Archived from the original on 23 December 2017. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  7. ^ "Taoiseach Leo Varadkar announces new Cabinet positions". RTÉ News. 14 June 2017. Archived from the original on 12 September 2017. Retrieved 14 June 2017. Charlie Flanagan has moved to become Minister for Justice in place of Ms Fitzgerald., ...
  8. ^ "Charlie Flanagan on Twitter". Twitter. Archived from the original on 14 February 2020. Retrieved 30 April 2018.
  9. ^ Bray, Jennifer. "Eight high-profile Fine Gael ministers have lost their Cabinet positions". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 8 July 2020. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  10. ^ a b "Charlie Flanagan: Calling off RIC commemoration 'right thing to do'". Irish Examiner. 8 January 2020.
  11. ^ "'This decision will cause hurt and upset to many people,' says Flanagan as RIC event deferred after Black and Tans criticism". Irish Independent. 7 January 2020.
  12. ^ "Glasnevin memorial wall to be discontinued after repeated vandalism". The Irish Times. 4 February 2022.
  13. ^ "Poppy 'not victory symbol'". The Irish Times. 10 November 1997.

External linksEdit

Oireachtas
Preceded by Fine Gael Teachta Dála
for Laois–Offaly

19872002
Succeeded by
Preceded by Fine Gael Teachta Dála
for Laois–Offaly

20072016
Succeeded by
Constituency abolished
New constituency Fine Gael Teachta Dála
for Laois

2016–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by Chairman of the Fine Gael Parliamentary Party
2011–2014
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Minister for Children and Youth Affairs
2014
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade
2014–2017
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Justice and Equality
2017–2020
Succeeded by