CWA Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction

The CWA Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction is a British literary award established in 1978 by the Crime Writers' Association, who have awarded the Gold Dagger fiction award since 1955.

In 1978 and 1979 only there was also a silver award. From 1995 to 2002 it was sponsored by The Macallan (Scotch whisky brand) and known as The Macallan Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction. In 2008 the award was sponsored by Owatonna Media (a London-based literary brand investor and owner). Between 2006 and 2010 it was awarded every other year, in even-numbered years, but in 2011 it returned as an annual award.. The prize is now a cheque for £1,000 and a decorative dagger.

Winners and shortlistsEdit

2020sEdit

2020

  • Winner: Casey Cep, Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud and the Last Trial of Harper Lee[1]
    • Peter Everett, Corrupt Bodies[2]
    • Caroline Goode, Honour: Achieving Justice for Banaz Mahmod
    • Sean O'Connor, The Fatal Passion of Alma Rattenbury
    • Adam Sisman, The Professor and the Parson
    • Susannah Stapleton, The Adventures of Maud West, Lady Detective

2010sEdit

Winners

2019 [3]

2018 [4]

2017[5]
  • Stephen Purvis, Close but no Cigar, Weidenfeld & Nicolson (Close but no Cigar: a true story of prison life in Castro's Cuba).

2016 [6]

  • Andrew Hankinson, You Could Do Something Amazing With Your Life [You Are Raoul Moat], Scribe

2015 [7]

  • Dan Davies, In Plain Sight: The Life and Lies of Jimmy Savile, Quercus
2014 [8]
2013[9]

2012 [10]

2011[11]
  • Douglas Starr, The Killer of Little Shepherds (The crimes and conviction of the nineteenth-century French serial murderer Joseph Vacher)
2010[12]
  • Ruth Dudley Edwards, Aftermath: The Omagh Bombing & the Families’ Pursuit of Justice (The successful civil case taken against the suspects for the Omagh bombing)

2000sEdit

2008[13][14]
2006[15]
2005[16]
2004[17]

Joint winners

2003[18]
2002[19]
  • Lillian Pizzichini, Dead Man's Wages: the secrets of a London conman and his family (Life of conman Charlie Taylor, the author's grandfather)
2001[20]
2000[21]
  • Edward Bunker, Mr. Blue: Memoirs of a Renegade (The author's own story of a life of crime)

1990sEdit

1999
1998
  • Gitta Sereny, Cries Unheard: Why Children Kill - The Story of Mary Bell
1997
  • Paul Britton, The Jigsaw Man (The Remarkable Career of Britain's Foremost Criminal Psychologist)
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
1990

1980sEdit

1989
  • Robert Lindsey, A Gathering of Saints: A True Story of Money, Murder and Deceit
1988
1987
1986
1985
1984
1983
  • Peter Watson, Double Dealer: How Five Art Dealers, Four Policemen, Three Picture Restorers, Two Auction Houses and a Journalist Plotted to Recover Some of the World's Most Beautiful Stolen Paintings
1982
1981
1980

1970sEdit

1979
1978

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Michael Robotham wins the 2020 Gold Dagger". The Booktopian. 2020-10-23. Retrieved 2020-10-23.
  2. ^ "ALCS Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction". The Crime Writers' Association. Retrieved 2020-08-16.
  3. ^ "The Crime Writers' Association". thecwa.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  4. ^ "The Crime Writers' Association". thecwa.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  5. ^ "The CWA Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2017. Archived from the original on 2019-05-07. Retrieved 2019-05-07.
  6. ^ "The Crime Writers' Association". thecwa.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  7. ^ "The Crime Writers' Association". thecwa.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  8. ^ "The Crime Writers' Association". thecwa.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  9. ^ "The CWA Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2013. Archived from the original on 2011-09-12. Retrieved 2011-09-17.
  10. ^ "The Crime Writers' Association". thecwa.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-09-08.
  11. ^ "The CWA Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-09-12. Retrieved 2011-09-17.
  12. ^ "The CWA Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2010. Archived from the original on 2011-09-02. Retrieved 2011-09-17.
  13. ^ "The CWA Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 2009-01-24. Retrieved 2009-02-08.
  14. ^ "CWA Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction shortlist". Crime Writers' Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 2009-01-07. Retrieved 2009-02-08.
  15. ^ "The CWA Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2006. Archived from the original on 2009-01-23. Retrieved 2009-02-08.
  16. ^ "CWA Dagger for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2005. Archived from the original on 2009-01-23. Retrieved 2009-02-11.
  17. ^ "The CWA's 2004 Non-Fiction Gold Dagger Award". Crime Writers' Association. 2004. Archived from the original on 2009-01-23. Retrieved 2009-02-11.
  18. ^ "The 2003 Gold Dagger Award for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2003. Archived from the original on 2009-01-24. Retrieved 2009-02-20.
  19. ^ "The CWA The Macallan Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2002. Archived from the original on 2009-01-23. Retrieved 2009-02-21.
  20. ^ "The 2001 CWA Non-Fiction Dagger: The Macallan Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction". Crime Writers' Association. 2001. Archived from the original on 2009-01-23. Retrieved 2009-02-21.
  21. ^ "The CWA Dagger Awards 2000". Crime Writers' Association. 2000. Archived from the original on 2009-02-24. Retrieved 2009-02-21.

External linksEdit