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Bethel Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania

Bethel Township is a township in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, United States. It contains the two unincorporated communities of Booth's Corner and Chelsea. The population was 8,791 at the 2010 census.

Bethel Township,
Delaware County,
Pennsylvania
Township
Entering Bethel Township on Pennsylvania Route 261
Entering Bethel Township on Pennsylvania Route 261
Location in Delaware County and the state of Pennsylvania.
Location in Delaware County and the state of Pennsylvania.
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Coordinates: 39°51′30″N 75°28′07″W / 39.85833°N 75.46861°W / 39.85833; -75.46861Coordinates: 39°51′30″N 75°28′07″W / 39.85833°N 75.46861°W / 39.85833; -75.46861
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Delaware
Established 1683
Area[1]
 • Total 5.41 sq mi (14.02 km2)
 • Land 5.41 sq mi (14.02 km2)
 • Water 0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation 444 ft (135 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 8,791
 • Estimate (2016)[2] 9,197
 • Density 1,699.69/sq mi (656.20/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 610
FIPS code 42-045-06024
Website www.twp.bethel.pa.us

Contents

HistoryEdit

 
The Booth Farm built in 1819 is listed on the National Register of Historical Places.

Bethel Township was the smallest of all the original townships of Chester County, Pennsylvania. The township is mentioned as early as 1683, and means "House of God".[3] In 1683, Edward Beazer and Edward Brown had 500 acres surveyed to them in the northeasterly end of the township. On this tract, Bethel hamlet, afterwards known as Corner Catch (Ketch), is the location of the current village of Chelsea.[4] In 1686, the road now known as Bethel Road was laid out from Bethel to Chichester (Marcus Hook).[5]

The settlers of Bethel Township were among the earliest settlers of the Pennsylvania Colony, and many were members of the Religious Society of Friends, or "Quakers".[6] The list of taxables for Bethel township in 1693, shows nine tax payers: John Gibbons, Ralph Pyle, John Bushel, Nicholas Pyle, Edward Beaner, Robert Eyre, Thomas Garrett, John Howard, Thomas Cooper. In 1715, the list had doubled to include: Robert Pyle, John Grist, Robert Booth, Edward Beazer, John Canady, Benjamin Moulder, Joseph Pyle, John Hickman, Edward Griffith, John Hopton, John Gibbons, and Thomas Durnell.[7] Robert Pyle, a leader of the Society of Friends, was almost continuously a member of the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly from 1688 until 1705.[8]

In 1759, residents of Bethel Township paid "a bounty" of ten pounds "in behalf of the township" along with a wagon and supplies of oats and flour to General John Forbes based on his request to Chester and other counties in the province to support an army about to march to Fort Duquesne under his command.[7]

In 1777, after the Battle of Brandywine, the British Army passed through Bethel Township on Old Concord Road as they chased the retreating Continental Army toward Chester and encamped at nearby Birmingham and Aston. Residents of Bethel were "annoyed and plundered" by the British army and many residents were left entirely without food.[9]

On September 26, 1789, Bethel Township became part of Delaware County as it was established by separating from the eastern portion of Chester County.[10]

The Siloam United Methodist Church in Bethel was founded in 1852[11] and is the only church in Bethel Township.[12]

Garnet mines were established in Bethel township by Herman Behr & Co. of New York in 1879.[13] The mine operated until 1912.[14] The garnet mine gave rise to the regional name of Garnet Valley.[15]

The Booth Farm built in 1819 is listed on the National Register of Historical Places.

GovernmentEdit

Bethel township is governed by a Board of Supervisors. By referendum, the board was increased from 3 to 5 members in 2011. Currently terms of office are staggered. After 2017, all members will serve terms of 6 years.[16]

The Bethel Police Department is appointed by the Board of Supervisors. The management team consists of chief, sergeant, detective and are supported by approximately 15 patrol officers.[17] They are the only Police Department in Delaware County that are not full-time police.

Bethel township is part of the Pennsylvania 7th Congressional District represented by Rep. Pat Meehan, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, District 160 represented by Stephen Barrar and the Pennsylvania Senate, District 9 represented by Tom Killion.

GeographyEdit

The township is located in the Southwest corner of Delaware County on the summit between the Delaware River and Brandywine Creek. The township is approximately 3 miles in length and 1.5 miles in width at the widest point.[3] According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 5.7 square miles (15 km2), all of it land.

Waterways in Bethel township include the southern branch of Naaman's Creek, Green Creek and Spring Run.

Bethel is bordered by Concord Township to the West, Aston Township to the North, Upper Chichester Township to the East and the State of Delaware to the South.

The southern border of Bethel is part of the Twelve-Mile Circle, the circular boundary between Delaware and Pennsylvania which dates back to 1681.

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1790 222
1800 240 8.1%
1930 864
1940 1,089 26.0%
1950 1,283 17.8%
1960 1,834 42.9%
1970 2,034 10.9%
1980 2,438 19.9%
1990 3,330 36.6%
2000 6,421 92.8%
2010 8,791 36.9%
Est. 2016 9,197 [2] 4.6%
[18]

As of Census 2010, the racial makeup of the township was 90.3% White, 1.8% African American, 0.2% Native American, 6.1% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.2% of the population [1].

As of the census[19] of 2000, there were 6,421 people, 1,984 households, and 1,732 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,132.3 people per square mile (437.2/km²). There were 2,017 housing units at an average density of 355.7/sq mi (137.3/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 94.44% White, 2.18% African American, 0.03% Native American, 2.41% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.33% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.93% of the population.

There were 1,984 households, out of which 50.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 78.3% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 12.7% were non-families. 9.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 3.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.16 and the average family size was 3.40.

In the township the population was spread out, with 31.5% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 20.2% from 45 to 64, and 8.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.7 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $84,661, and the median income for a family was $87,248. Males had a median income of $60,496 versus $36,272 for females. The per capita income for the township was $29,349. About 1.0% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 4.4% of those age 65 or over.

EducationEdit

Bethel Township is part of the Garnet Valley School District.

The first school built in Bethel was in 1780 on the corner of Kirk and Foulk Road. In 1824, a school opened on a lot on Bethel Road East of Booth's Corner and was later known as public school No. 1.

In 1834, the Pennsylvania Public School Act was passed by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth. The law required that every township, borough and city in the state provide a school for its children. Since Bethel Township already had a subscription school, the school was converted into a public school. The first school inspectors appointed for Bethel were Robert McCall and John Larkin.[20]

In 1839, a one-story octoganal school house was built at Booth's Corner and used for several years until destroyed by fire. In 1870, the school was replaced with a one-story structure was built and named School No. 2. A second story was added in 1898. The second floor was designated School No. 4 and used as student population necessitated. The building was sold on September 2, 1953 to Brigg's Auction.[21]

 
School No. 2 and No. 4 in Bethel Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania

School No. 3 was built in 1860 on Bethel Road west of the village of Chelsea. [22]

The first non-single room school in Bethel Township, Francis Harvey Green School, was dedicated on November 9, 1951.[11] The school was demolished in 2010.[23]

On July 1, 1964, Bethel agreed to join with Concord and Chester Heights Borough to form the Garnet Valley School District. On June 9, 1969, the Bethel Township School Board was dissolved.[24]

Bethel Springs Elementary School is the only school residing in Bethel Township. It was opened on September 4, 2002 for grades 1-5.[25]

TransportationEdit

  PA 261 (Foulk Road)

  US 322 (Conchester Highway)

  PA 491 (Naamans Creek Road)

Notable peopleEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Aug 13, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Ashmead, Henry Graham (1884). History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts & Co. p. 305. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 
  4. ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1884). History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts & Co. p. 306. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 
  5. ^ Goodley, George Walter (1987). Bethel Township Delaware County, Pennsylvania Thru Three Centuries. p. 13. 
  6. ^ Biographical and Historical Cyclopedia of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, by Samuel T. Wiley
  7. ^ a b Ashmead, Henry Graham (1884). History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts & Co. p. 307. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 
  8. ^ Colonial And Revolutionary Families Of Pennsylvania, by John W. Jordan
  9. ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1884). History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts & Co. p. 308. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 
  10. ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1884). History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts & Co. pp. 77–83. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 
  11. ^ a b Jordan, John W. (1914). A History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania and Its People. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company. p. 410. Retrieved 21 May 2017. 
  12. ^ "Siloam United Methodist Church". www.siloamumc.net. Retrieved 21 June 2017. 
  13. ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1884). History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts & Co. p. 310. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 
  14. ^ "Behr Garnet Mine, Chelsea, Bethel Township, Delaware County, Pennsylvania". www.mindat.org. Retrieved 20 May 2017. 
  15. ^ McCarrick, Elizabeth (August 5, 2013). Bethel Township, Delaware County. Pennsylvania: Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 9780738598185. 
  16. ^ "Bethel Township Website". www.twp.bethel.pa.us. Retrieved 29 May 2017. 
  17. ^ "Bethel Township Website". www.twp.bethel.pa.us. Retrieved 29 May 2017. 
  18. ^ http://www.dvrpc.org/data/databull/rdb/db82/appedixa.xls
  19. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ Goodley, George Walter (1987). Bethel Township Delaware County, Pennsylvania Thru Three Centuries. p. 46. 
  21. ^ McCarrick, Elizabeth (2013). Bethel Township, Delaware County. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. p. 82. ISBN 978-0-7385-9818-5. 
  22. ^ Jordan, John W. (1914). A History of Delaware County Pennsylvania and Its People. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company. p. 429. Retrieved 23 May 2017. 
  23. ^ Shomo, Eileen. "Portrait of Francis Harvey Green rests at Siloam Church". www.delconewsnetwork.com. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 
  24. ^ Goodley, George Walter (1987). Bethel Township Delaware County, Pennsylvania Thru Three Centuries. pp. 50–51. 
  25. ^ "Voices of the Valley" (PDF). www.garnetvalleyschools.com. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 
  26. ^ Goodley, George Walter (1987). Bethel Township Delaware County, Pennsylvania Thru Three Centuries. p. 92. 
  27. ^ Ashmead, Henry Graham (1884). History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts & Co. p. 309. Retrieved 24 May 2017. 

External linksEdit