Tubo, officially the Municipality of Tubo (Ilocano: Ili ti Tubo; Tagalog: Bayan ng Tubo), is a 4th class municipality in the province of Abra, Philippines. According to the 2020 census, it has a population of 5,674 people.[3]

Tubo
Municipality of Tubo
Flag of Tubo
Official seal of Tubo
Map of Abra with Tubo highlighted
Map of Abra with Tubo highlighted
OpenStreetMap
Map
Tubo is located in Philippines
Tubo
Tubo
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 17°16′N 120°44′E / 17.26°N 120.73°E / 17.26; 120.73
CountryPhilippines
RegionCordillera Administrative Region
ProvinceAbra
District Lone district
Barangays10 (see Barangays)
Government
[1]
 • TypeSangguniang Bayan
 • MayorLiberty B. La-os
 • Vice MayorGuilbert P. Ballangan
 • RepresentativeMenchie B. Bernos
 • Municipal Council
Members
 • Electorate3,793 voters (2022)
Area
 • Total409.87 km2 (158.25 sq mi)
Elevation
576 m (1,890 ft)
Highest elevation
1,422 m (4,665 ft)
Lowest elevation
168 m (551 ft)
Population
 (2020 census)[3]
 • Total5,674
 • Density14/km2 (36/sq mi)
 • Households
1,028
Economy
 • Income class4th municipal income class
 • Poverty incidence
20.17
% (2021)[4]
 • Revenue₱ 143 million (2020)
 • Assets₱ 303.7 million (2020)
 • Expenditure₱ 102.2 million (2020)
 • Liabilities₱ 23.26 million (2020)
Service provider
 • ElectricityAbra Electric Cooperative (ABRECO)
Time zoneUTC+8 (PST)
ZIP code
2814
PSGC
IDD:area code+63 (0)74
Native languagesItneg
Ilocano
Tagalog

History edit

The municipality was created on June 17, 1967, from the former municipal district of the same name, through Republic Act 5161.[5]

Beew massacre edit

On May 6, 1983, Sitio Beew in Tubo was the site of several attacks by the 623rd Philippine Constabulary (623rd PC) led by Captain Berido, Lt. Rehaldo Lebua and Lt. Juanito Puyawan, which would collectively come to be known as the "Beew Massacre." The 623rd PC burned down four houses and a rice granary, which still contained the remains of three villagers including an unborn baby, and Barangay Councilman Rodolfo Labawig, pregnant mother Josefina Cayandag, and her unborn child.[6] Beew residents,including babies and toddlers, were beaten and their houses looted in response to the residents' alleged support of protests against the logging operations of Herminio Disini's Cellophil Resources Corporation in their area.[6]

The residents fled to Sagada where they took refuge in the Church of the St. Mary. There, they were given succor by Fr. Paul Sagayo Jr. until they could finally be aided by Atty Pablo Sanidad of the Free Legal Assistance Group and journalist Isidoro Chammag of the Bulletin Today.[7]: 197-198 

The government denied the incident, and filed a case against Chammag but the Baguio Press supported Chammag and launched the "Piso para kay Chammag" campaign to raise bail for him. The charges were later dismissed and Chammag's became a landmark case in Philippine Jurisprudence.[7]: 197-198 

Geography edit

Tubo is located at 17°16′N 120°44′E / 17.26°N 120.73°E / 17.26; 120.73.

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority, the municipality has a land area of 409.87 square kilometres (158.25 sq mi)[8] constituting 9.84% of the 4,165.25-square-kilometre- (1,608.21 sq mi) total area of Abra.

It is situated approximately 55 kilometres (34 mi) from the provincial capital Bangued, and is at the southern tip of Abra. The town is bounded on the west by Ilocos Sur and Luba, Abra, north by Boliney, east by Kalinga and Mountain Province, and south by Mountain Province and Ilocos Sur.

Tubo can be reached through various routes. Coming from Bangued, the place can be reached by passing through the towns of Peñarrubia-Bucay-Manabo and Luba. It could also be reached via Candon-San Emilio and Tagudin-Quirino of the nearby province of Ilocos Sur, or via Besao of Mountain Province or Kalinga. Unfortunately, no road links exist herein.[clarification needed]

Barangays edit

Tubo is politically subdivided into 10 barangays.[9] Each barangay consists of puroks and some have sitios.


PSGC Barangay Population ±% p.a.
2020[3] 2010[10]
140126001 Alangtin 10.1% 571 650 −1.29%
140126002 Amtuagan 9.1% 519 494 0.49%
140126003 Dilong 13.0% 735 818 −1.06%
140126004 Kili 7.6% 431 426 0.12%
140126005 Poblacion (Mayabo) 10.3% 584 582 0.03%
140126006 Supo 13.7% 779 732 0.62%
140126010 Tabacda 5.0% 284 246 1.45%
140126007 Tiempo 15.2% 862 800 0.75%
140126008 Tubtuba 7.6% 431 491 −1.29%
140126009 Wayangan 8.4% 478 480 −0.04%
Total 5,674 5,674   0.00%

The 10 barangays are grouped into three (3) zones:

  • Zone 1: Poblacion (Mayabo), Wayangan and Supo
  • Zone 2: Tiempo, Kili, Tabacda and Amtuagan
  • Zone 3: Alangtin-Batayan, Tubtuba and Dilong

Climate edit

Climate data for Tubo, Abra
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Mean daily maximum °C (°F) 26
(79)
27
(81)
29
(84)
31
(88)
30
(86)
30
(86)
29
(84)
29
(84)
29
(84)
28
(82)
27
(81)
26
(79)
28
(83)
Mean daily minimum °C (°F) 18
(64)
19
(66)
20
(68)
22
(72)
23
(73)
24
(75)
23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(73)
21
(70)
21
(70)
20
(68)
21
(70)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 23
(0.9)
28
(1.1)
33
(1.3)
64
(2.5)
232
(9.1)
242
(9.5)
258
(10.2)
266
(10.5)
245
(9.6)
201
(7.9)
87
(3.4)
69
(2.7)
1,748
(68.7)
Average rainy days 8.3 8.0 10.8 15.2 23.7 26.1 27.0 25.8 23.5 17.3 13.7 12.1 211.5
Source: Meteoblue[11]

Demographics edit

Population census of Tubo
YearPop.±% p.a.
1918 2,022—    
1939 3,041+1.96%
1948 1,981−4.65%
1960 4,198+6.46%
1970 4,386+0.44%
1975 4,018−1.74%
1980 4,985+4.41%
1990 4,589−0.82%
1995 4,344−1.02%
2000 5,044+3.25%
2007 5,588+1.42%
2010 5,719+0.85%
2015 5,699−0.07%
2020 5,674−0.09%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[12][10][13][14]

The inhabitants belong to the Maeng tribe and speak the dialect of the same name. There is however one barangay, Tabacda, that speaks a different dialect. This is because they are believed to have originated from Kalinga and Mountain Province. Everyone can however understand and speak the common evolving dialect called Maeng together with those of Luba and parts of Villavicioa of the Province of Abra and likewise in the other municipalities of the Province of Ilocos Sur, who refer themselves as the Bago tribe.

Agriculture is the main source of livelihood but various industries are starting to grow.

All barangays and their respective sitios do now have dirt roads leading to them but can still become accessible via trails permanently established even during the Spanish era. Electricity is available except in only one barangay and two sitios. The relative nearness of the three barangays of Dilong,Tubtuba and Alangtin to the Province of Ilocos Sur provided them the privilege of being served by ISECO while all others remaining are served by ABRECO.

In the 2020 census, Tubo had a population of 5,674.[3] The population density was 14 inhabitants per square kilometre (36/sq mi).

Economy edit

Poverty incidence of Tubo

10
20
30
40
50
60
2006
53.30
2009
56.36
2012
51.66
2015
30.48
2018
23.59
2021
20.17

Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22]

Government edit

Local government edit

Tubo, belonging to the lone congressional district of the province of Abra, is governed by a mayor designated as its local chief executive and by a municipal council as its legislative body in accordance with the Local Government Code. The mayor, vice mayor, and the councilors are elected directly by the people through an election which is being held every three years.

Elected officials edit

Members of the Municipal Council
(2019–2022)[23]
Position Name
Congresswoman CHING B. BERNOS
Mayor LIBERTY B. LA-OS
Vice-Mayor GUILBERT P. BALLANGAN
Councilors FLORENTINO W. PATILAO JR.
MARCELINO B. PE BENITO SR.
NOMER B. MACARIO
SAULO A. DEL ROSARIO JR.
RODRIGO B. TADLANG
BENJAMIN N. DAWALA
ELMER C. ALEM
THOMAS B. LAWAGAN

References edit

  1. ^ Municipality of Tubo | (DILG)
  2. ^ "2015 Census of Population, Report No. 3 – Population, Land Area, and Population Density" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. Quezon City, Philippines. August 2016. ISSN 0117-1453. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 25, 2021. Retrieved July 16, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c d Census of Population (2020). "Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  4. ^ "PSA Releases the 2021 City and Municipal Level Poverty Estimates". Philippine Statistics Authority. 2 April 2024. Retrieved 28 April 2024.
  5. ^ "Republic Act No. 5161 - An Act Creating the Municipality of Tubo in the Province of Abra". Chan Robles Virtual Law Library. 17 June 1967. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  6. ^ a b https://nordis.net/2016/04/10/topic/rights-and-welfare/terror-reigns-in-abra-revisited/
  7. ^ a b Panaglagip: The North Remembers – Martial Law Stories of Struggle and Survival Edited by Joanna K. Cariño and Luchie B. Maranan.
  8. ^ "Province: Abra". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  9. ^ "Municipal: Tubo, Abra". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 8 January 2016.
  10. ^ a b Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR)" (PDF). Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. National Statistics Office. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  11. ^ "Tubo: Average Temperatures and Rainfall". Meteoblue. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
  12. ^ Census of Population (2015). "Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
  13. ^ Censuses of Population (1903–2007). "Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR)". Table 1. Population Enumerated in Various Censuses by Province/Highly Urbanized City: 1903 to 2007. National Statistics Office.{{cite encyclopedia}}: CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  14. ^ "Province of Abra". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved 17 December 2016.
  15. ^ "Poverty incidence (PI):". Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  16. ^ "Estimation of Local Poverty in the Philippines" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. 29 November 2005.
  17. ^ "2003 City and Municipal Level Poverty Estimates" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. 23 March 2009.
  18. ^ "City and Municipal Level Poverty Estimates; 2006 and 2009" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. 3 August 2012.
  19. ^ "2012 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. 31 May 2016.
  20. ^ "Municipal and City Level Small Area Poverty Estimates; 2009, 2012 and 2015". Philippine Statistics Authority. 10 July 2019.
  21. ^ "PSA Releases the 2018 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates". Philippine Statistics Authority. 15 December 2021. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  22. ^ "PSA Releases the 2021 City and Municipal Level Poverty Estimates". Philippine Statistics Authority. 2 April 2024. Retrieved 28 April 2024.
  23. ^ "2019 National and Local Elections" (PDF). Commission on Elections. Retrieved March 12, 2022.

External links edit