Aure, Norway

Aure is a municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is part of the region of Nordmøre. The administrative centre is the village of Aure. Other villages in Aure include Gullstein, Stemshaug, Todalen, Tjeldbergodden, Arasvika, and Tømmervåg. Aure has one of the largest wooden churches in Norway, Aure Church.

Aure kommune
View of Arasvika in Aure
View of Arasvika in Aure
Coat of arms of Aure kommune
Coat of arms
Official logo of Aure kommune
Møre og Romsdal within
Norway
Aure within Møre og Romsdal
Aure within Møre og Romsdal
Coordinates: 63°16′07″N 08°36′28″E / 63.26861°N 8.60778°E / 63.26861; 8.60778Coordinates: 63°16′07″N 08°36′28″E / 63.26861°N 8.60778°E / 63.26861; 8.60778
CountryNorway
CountyMøre og Romsdal
DistrictNordmøre
Established1 Jan 1838
Administrative centreAure
Government
 • Mayor (2019)Hanne Berit Brekken (Ap)
Area
 • Total641.39 km2 (247.64 sq mi)
 • Land621.73 km2 (240.05 sq mi)
 • Water19.66 km2 (7.59 sq mi)  3.1%
Area rank179 in Norway
Population
 (2020)
 • Total3,507
 • Rank216 in Norway
 • Density5.6/km2 (15/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
0.1%
Demonym(s)Aurgjelding[1]
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-1576
Official language formNeutral[2]
Websiteaure.kommune.no

The 641-square-kilometre (247 sq mi) municipality is the 179th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Aure is the 216th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 3,507. The municipality's population density is 5.6 inhabitants per square kilometre (15/sq mi) and its population has increased by 0.1% over the previous 10-year period.[3][4]

General informationEdit

 
View of the Foldfjord

The municipality was established on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). On 1 January 1894, the southern district of Aure (population: 942) was separated to form the new municipality of Valsøyfjord. Then on 1 July 1914, the northeastern district of Aure (population: 851) was separated to form the new municipality of Stemshaug.

During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1965, Stemshaug Municipality (population: 877), the part of Valsøyfjord Municipality on the island of Ertvågsøya (population: 141), and the part of Tustna Municipality on Ertvågsøya (population: 85) were all merged into Aure. On 1 January 1976, the district of Aure located south of the Vinjefjorden (population: 158) was merged into the neighboring Halsa Municipality. On 1 January 2006, Tustna Municipality was merged into Aure.[5]

NameEdit

The municipality (originally the parish) is named after the old Aure farm (Old Norse: Aurar), since the first Aure Church was built there. The name is the plural form of aurr which means "gravel".[6]

Coat of armsEdit

The coat of arms were granted on 21 December 2005, just before the merger of the municipalities of Tustna and Aure. They are based on the arms of the old municipality of Tustna, only the colors were changed. The arms show a white klippfisk (cod) on a blue background. The commercial production of cod in Norway started in Tustna around 1690.[7]

Prior to 2006, the arms of Aure were red with the gold faces of two sea eagles facing opposite directions. There is a large population of these birds in Aure. These arms were granted on 22 March 1991 and they were used until 1 January 2006.[7]

ChurchesEdit

The Church of Norway has three parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Aure. It is part of the Ytre Nordmøre prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Møre.

Churches in Aure
Parish (sokn) Church name Location of the church Year built
Aure Aure Church Aure 1924
Stemshaug Stemshaug Church Stemshaug 1908
Tustna Gullstein Church Gullstein 1869
Sør-Tustna Chapel Tømmervåg 1952

GeographyEdit

 
View of Tustna.

The municipality includes many islands as well as some parts of the mainland. Islands of Aure include Ertvågsøya, Grisvågøya, Rottøya, Ruøya, Skardsøya, Solskjelsøya, Stabblandet, and Tustna. The Vinjefjorden, Arasvikfjord, and Edøyfjorden surround the municipality. Several bridges connect the islands including the Mjosund Bridge, Aursund Bridge, and Dromnessund Bridge.

GovernmentEdit

All municipalities in Norway, including Aure, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elect a mayor.[8] The municipality falls under the Nordmøre District Court and the Frostating Court of Appeal. The current Mayor of Aure is Hanne Berit Brekken

Municipal councilEdit

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Aure is made up of 19 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Aure Kommunestyre 2020–2023 [9]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
 Nordmøre List (Nordmørslista)2
Total number of members:19
Aure Kommunestyre 2016–2019 [10]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:21
Aure Kommunestyre 2012–2015 [11]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:21
Aure Kommunestyre 2008–2011 [10]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:23
Aure Kommunestyre 2004–2007 [10]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
 Aure List (Aurelista)2
 Omega Action (Omega-aksjonen)2
Total number of members:21
Aure Kommunestyre 2000–2003 [10]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)6
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:21
Aure Kommunestyre 1996–1999 [12]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)5
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:21
Aure Kommunestyre 1992–1995 [13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
 Conservative Party (Høyre)6
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:21
Aure Kommunestyre 1988–1991 [14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:25
Aure Kommunestyre 1984–1987 [15]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:25
Aure Kommunestyre 1980–1983 [16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:25
Aure Kommunestyre 1976–1979 [17]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:25
Aure Kommunestyre 1972–1975 [18]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:25
Aure Kommunestyre 1968–1971 [19]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)12
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Liberal Party (Venstre)5
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)2
Total number of members:29
Aure Kommunestyre 1964–1967 [20]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)5
Total number of members:21
Aure Herredsstyre 1960–1963 [21]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)6
Total number of members:21
Aure Herredsstyre 1956–1959 [22]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)6
Total number of members:21
Aure Herredsstyre 1952–1955 [23]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)5
Total number of members:20
Aure Herredsstyre 1948–1951 [24]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)5
Total number of members:20
Aure Herredsstyre 1945–1947 [25]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)5
 Liberal Party (Venstre)6
 Local List(s) (Lokale lister)1
Total number of members:20
Aure Herredsstyre 1938–1941* [26]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)8
 Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:20

MayorEdit

The mayors of Aure (incomplete list):

  • 2019–present: Hanne Berit Brekken (Ap)
  • 2007-2019: Ingunn Oldervik Golmen (Sp)
  • 2006-2007: Hans G. Lauritzen (Ap)
  • 1989-2006: Knut Baardset (H)

EconomyEdit

Agriculture and aquaculture employ 13.6% of the workforce, mostly within dairy farming, fishing, and fish farming. Manufacturing industry and construction employ 25.5%, where the most important industries are the shipyards in Mjosundet and the natural gas processing plant in Tjeldbergodden, as well as the Tjeldbergodden Reserve Power Station. A liquefied natural gas (LNG) pipeline from the Heidrun oil field terminates here. The remaining 60.5% work in the service industry.[27]

Notable residentsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2020). "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2020). "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  6. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1908). Norske gaardnavne: Romsdals amt (in Norwegian) (13 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 433.
  7. ^ a b "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 2019-04-13.
  8. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (2016-05-12). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 2019-04-06.
  9. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Møre og Romsdal" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway. Retrieved 2019-10-19.
  10. ^ a b c d "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  11. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Møre og Romsdal" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway. Retrieved 2019-10-19.
  12. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  13. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  14. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  15. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  16. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  17. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1975" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  18. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1972" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  19. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  20. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  21. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  22. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  23. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  24. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  25. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  26. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938. Retrieved 2020-04-26.
  27. ^ "Tall om Aure kommune 2008". Archived from the original on 2007-10-14. Retrieved 2010-02-25.

External linksEdit