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Archery at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's individual

The women's individual archery event at the 2012 Olympic Games was held from 27 July to 2 August at Lord's Cricket Ground in London in the United Kingdom. The event was one of four which comprised the 2012 Olympics archery programme of sports. It was the eleventh time the women's individual competition was contested at the Games. Forty different nations qualified for the event, sending a total of sixty-four archers to compete. The defending Olympic champion from 2008 was Zhang Juanjuan of China, who did not compete following her retirement in 2010.[1][2]

Women's individual
at the Games of the XXX Olympiad
Korea Olympic KiBobae 05 (7730586140).jpg
Gold medallist Ki Bo-bae during the event
VenueLord's Cricket Ground
Dates27 July – 2 August
Competitors64 from 40 nations
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Ki Bo-bae  South Korea
2nd, silver medalist(s) Aída Román  Mexico
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Mariana Avitia  Mexico
← 2008
2016 →

Ki Bo-Bae of South Korea won the gold medal. Mexico's Aída Román and Mariana Avitia won the silver and bronze medals respectively.

Contents

BackgroundEdit

The women's individual event has been held as part of every Summer Olympics archery programme since the 1972 Games in Munich. Since the 1984 Summer Olympics, archers from South Korea had dominated the event, claiming six of the previous seven gold medals. Their winning streak was broken at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing when Zhang Juanjuan defeating defending Olympic champion Park Sung-hyun in the final, becoming the first non-South Korean archer to win the women's individual gold medal since Keto Losaberidze of the Soviet Union in 1980.[3]

In October 2011 an official test event, the London Archery Classic, was held at the Lord's Cricket Ground to evaluate the venue's preparations and give archers and coaches the chance to familiarise themselves with the location and schedule ahead of the Games the following year. World number one Jung Dasomi of South Korea won the women's individual event, defeating Poland's Justyna Mospinek in the final. Ki Bo-bae of South Korea won the bronze medal ahead of Japan's Ren Hayakama.[4]

QualificationEdit

Sixty-four places were available for the event with a maximum of three archers representing each National Olympic Committee (NOC).[note 1] As host nation Great Britain qualified three places automatically; ten other nations (China, Denmark, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, South Korea, Chinese Taipei, and Ukraine) additionally entered the maximum berth of archers.[6]

FormatEdit

 
An official World Archery target is divided into ten evenly-spaced concentric rings. An arrow landing in the outermost ring wins one point; striking the centre yellow circle earns the maximum ten points.

The women's individual was an outdoor recurve target archery event. Held under the World Archery-approved rules, archers shot at a 122cm-wide target from a distance of 70 metres. The competition consisted of three stages: an initial ranking round, five elimination rounds, and two finals matches deciding the medal placings. In the ranking round, each of the 64 archers entering the competition shot a total of 72 arrows. The total cumulative score of each archer was used to seed the archers into the following five-round single-elimination tournament, the highest-scoring archer receiving the number one seed.[7]

The elimination rounds introduced a new format, the Archery Olympic Round, to the Olympic Games. From 1992 until 2008, the elimination matches were decided by each archer shooting 12 arrows, the highest cumulative score determining who progressed to the next round. Approved in 2009 by the sport's governing body, the World Archery Federation, the new Archery Olympic Round was designed to sustain audience interest throughout the knockout matches and prevent encounters from being decided prematurely from a single poor shot. According to the new system, each match consisted of a maximum of five sets, with archers each shooting three arrows per set. The archer with the best score from their three arrows won the set, earning two points. The archer with the lowest score in each set received zero points. If the score was tied, each archer received one point. The first archer to six points was declared the winner. If the match was tied 5-5 after the maximum 5 sets were played, a single tie-breaker arrow was used with the closest to centre of the target winning.[8]

ScheduleEdit

Day Date Time Stage
0 Friday, 27 July 2012 13:00–15:00 Ranking round
3 Monday, 30 July 2012 09:00–12:55
15:00–17:40
1/32 elimination round
1/16 elimination round
4 Tuesday, 31 July 2012
5 Wednesday, 1 August 2012
6 Thursday, 2 August 2012 09:00–10:44 1/8 elimination round
14:00–14:52 Quarter-finals
14:52–15:05 Semi-finals
15:21–15:50 Bronze medal match
Gold medal match
All times are British Summer Time (UTC+01:00).
Source:
[9]

RecordsEdit

  • 70 metres - 72 arrow ranking round
Archer Score Location Date Ref
World record   Park Sung-hyun (KOR) 682 Gwangju, South Korea 12 August 2004 [10]
Olympic record   Lina Herasymenko (UKR) 673 Atlanta, United States 28 July 1996

The Olympic record score of 673 set by Ukraine's Lina Herasymenko at the 1996 Summer Olympics, which was equalled by Park at the 2008 Summer Olympics,[11] remained unbroken going into the Games.

ReportEdit

Ki Bo-bae, Lee Sung-jin, and Tan Ya-ting each tied on 671 points in the ranking round on 27 July and were only separated by the number of arrows landing in the 10-ring, Ki claiming number one seed with thirty-one 10-scores ahead of Lee and Tan; South Korea's third archer Choi Hyeon-ju struggled with nerves on her Olympic debut and finished 21st overall after being ranked 38th after 36 arrows.[12] Despite claiming two of the highest seeds for the elimination rounds, Jang Young-sool, the head of the South Korean archery coaching team, was nevertheless disappointed that his archers did not post higher scores.[13] The three British archers had a disappointing ranking round, Naomi Folkard finishing highest, claiming the 42nd seed.[14]

World number one Deepika Kumari suffered a shock defeat in the opening elimination round which began the following week, losing to 57th seed Amy Oliver of Great Britain in four sets. Kumari blamed the strong winds for her performance and did not appear comfortable in the cool and overcast conditions, failing to shoot a single arrow in the 10-ring. Her defeat was described by the Press Trust of India as a big setback in India's pursuit of Olympic medals, while the BBC lauded Oliver's victory as her greatest career win. Oliver would later lose to Indonesia's Ika Yuliana Rochmawati in the following round.[15][16] Oliver's teammates Alison Williamson and Folkard fared little better, Williamson losing in the first knockout round to Bishindee Urantungalag of Mongolia, while Folkard was eliminated by Mexico's Mariana Avitia in the 1/16 elimination round.[17] The first elimination round also saw Bhutan's participation at the Olympic Games end with Serhab Zam's defeat to Lorig of the United States, the nation having sent just two athletes to London.[18]

 
Ki Bo-bae (centre), Aída Román (left), and Mariana Avitia (right) during the medal presentation ceremony.

The final rounds took place on Thursday, 2 August. In the 1/8 elimination round Bérengère Schuh, the sole Frenchwoman in the field, defeated Choi in a one-arrow shoot-off after the South Korean came back from four set points down to tie the match in the fifth set. With windy conditions developing in the afternoon in time for the quarter-finals, Lorig defeated Schuh after a poor third set by the Frenchwoman, who was unable to fully master the conditions, while Avitia emerged as the surpise victor against second-seed Lee.[19] Lee's exit marked the first time since the 1996 Summer Olympics that South Korea failed to win at least two medals in the women's individual event.[20]

Ki, the sole South Korean to advance to the semi-finals, dispatched Khatuna Lorig following an upgraded score of one of her arrows after a review in the fourth set.[21] The second semi-final featured Avitia and Román, guaranteeing at least one medal for the Mexican archery contigent. Román advanced to the final against Ki, while Avitia went on to contest the bronze medal match with Lorig.

Avitia appeared more comfortable with the shifting winds in the bronze medal match, scoring a perfect 30 in the first set and ultimately winning in four sets after Lorig shot a six with her final arrow. Lorig nevertheless earlier managed a shot so precise to the centre of the target that the arrow bounced off the target after striking the camera hole.[22] Avitia's victory gave Mexico its first ever Olympic archery medal.

The gold medal match between Ki and Román was a close affair. After winning one set apiece with a tie in the second set, Ki shot a perfect 30 in the fourth, only for Román to outscore Ki 27-26 in the fifth and final set, necessitating a shoot-off. Both Ki and Román landed their arrows into the 8-ring, but Ki's was judged to be marginally closer to the centre, giving her the victory.[23][24]

Ki's win was the seventh time in eight Olympic women's individual events that South Korea had claimed the top honour, and the fourteenth archery gold medal from a possible fifteen for the country since the 1984 Summer Olympics.[22][23] A tearful Ki later apologised during a press conference after she had been awarded her the gold medal, stating that "Koreans do not shoot eights".[25] Román and Avitia meanwhile received a call from the President of Mexico congratulating them on achieving their nation's debut Olympic archery medals.[25] Their double success was the first time since the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles that Mexican athletes had won two medals in the same discipline at the same Games, and the first time that it had been achieved by Mexican women.[20]

ResultsEdit

Ranking roundEdit

Rank Archer Half Score 10s Xs
1st 2nd
1   Ki Bo-Bae (KOR) 339 332 671 31 13
2   Lee Sung-Jin (KOR) 338 333 671 30 4
3   Tan Ya-ting (TPE) 337 334 671 28 8
4   Khatuna Lorig (USA) 331 338 669 32 4
5   Lin Chia-En (TPE) 338 329 667 33 8
6   Miki Kanie (JPN) 335 330 665 30 7
7   Carina Christiansen (DEN) 332 331 663 26 8
8   Deepika Kumari (IND) 327 335 662 25 8
9   Ksenia Perova (RUS) 329 330 659 28 7
10   Mariana Avitia (MEX) 334 325 659 20 8
11   Aída Román (MEX) 329 329 658 28 9
12   Ana Rendón (COL) 327 330 657 25 14
13   Alejandra Valencia (MEX) 324 333 657 24 4
14   Miranda Leek (USA) 331 325 656 24 8
15   Jennifer Nichols (USA) 328 326 654 27 7
16   Ren Hayakawa (JPN) 324 330 654 24 12
17   Inna Stepanova (RUS) 323 330 653 24 7
18   Urantungalag Bishindee (MGL) 333 319 652 25 10
19   Pia Carmen Lionetti (ITA) 328 324 652 24 8
20   Cheng Ming (CHN) 326 325 651 25 6
21   Choi Hyeon-Ju (KOR) 321 330 651 23 9
22   Bombayla Devi Laishram (IND) 327 324 651 20 4
23   Kristina Timofeeva (RUS) 325 325 650 30 8
24   Natalia Valeeva (ITA) 322 328 650 23 5
25   Fang Yuting (CHN) 326 323 649 20 5
26   Begül Löklüoğlu (TUR) 324 324 648 21 6
27   Xu Jing (CHN) 318 328 646 25 8
28   Kaori Kawanaka (JPN) 321 325 646 25 4
29   Marie-Pier Beaudet (CAN) 318 327 645 23 4
30   Elena Richter (GER) 321 324 645 22 4
31   Denisse van Lamoen (CHI) 321 324 645 18 5
32   Lidiia Sichenikova (UKR) 323 322 645 18 5
33   Yekaterina Mulyuk-Timofeyeva (BLR) 327 317 644 15 6
34   Kristine Esebua (GEO) 320 322 642 15 6
35   Maja Jager (DEN) 325 317 642 15 2
36   Louise Laursen (DEN) 310 331 641 24 6
37   Bérengère Schuh (FRA) 319 321 640 24 7
38   Natalia Leśniak (POL) 322 317 639 20 5
39   Le Chien-Ying (TPE) 317 321 638 15 4
40   Ika Yuliana Rochmawati (INA) 318 320 638 14 6
41   Kwon Un-Sil (PRK) 321 317 638 14 3
42   Naomi Folkard (GBR) 317 320 637 21 5
43   Evangelia Psarra (GRE) 323 313 636 21 8
44   Jessica Tomasi (ITA) 311 324 635 21 7
45   Leidys Brito (VEN) 317 317 634 17 3
46   Karen Hultzer (RSA) 319 312 631 16 5
47   Alison Williamson (GBR) 310 319 629 16 5
48   Rachelle Anne Cabral (PHI) 318 309 627 17 4
49   Christine Bjerendal (SWE) 311 314 625 20 5
50   Chekrovolu Swuro (IND) 309 316 625 19 9
51   Kateryna Palekha (UKR) 305 319 624 16 6
52   Reena Pärnat (EST) 304 317 621 21 5
53   Iria Grandal (ESP) 306 312 618 15 4
54   Anastassiya Bannova (KAZ) 309 305 614 15 2
55   Zahra Dehghan (IRI) 305 309 614 9 0
56   Nada Kamel (EGY) 314 297 611 12 3
57   Amy Oliver (GBR) 303 305 608 13 5
58   Elisa Barnard (AUS) 298 303 601 13 3
59   Tetyana Dorokhova (UKR) 295 304 599 10 4
60   Nurul Syafiqah Hashim (MAS) 302 297 599 9 3
61   Sherab Zam (BHU) 286 303 589 7 3
62   Nathalie Dielen (SUI) 254 274 528 8 1
63   Maureen Tuimalealiifano (SAM) 253 267 520 6 2
64   Rand Al-Mashhadani (IRQ) 250 248 498 9 1
Source:[26]

Competition bracketEdit

Section 1Edit

Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarter-finals
                                
1   B-B Ki (KOR) 2 2 2
64   R Mashhadani (IRQ) 0 0 0
1   B-B Ki (KOR) 2 0 2 2
33   Y Timofeyeva (BLR) 0 2 0 0
32   L Sichenikova (UKR) 0 0 1 2 2 0
33   Y Timofeyeva (BLR) 2 2 1 0 0 1
1   B-B Ki (KOR) 2 2 2
16   R Hayakawa (JPN) 0 0 0
16   R Hayakawa (JPN) 2 0 0 2 2
49   C Bjerendal (SWE) 0 2 2 0 0
16   R Hayakawa (JPN) 2 0 2 1 2
17   I Stepanova (RUS) 0 2 0 1 0
17   I Stepanova (RUS) 2 2 1 2
48   R Cabral (PHI) 0 0 1 0
1   B-B Ki (KOR) 1 2 0 2 1
9   K Perova (RUS) 1 0 2 0 1
8   D Kumari (IND) 0 2 0 0
57   A Oliver (GBR) 2 0 2 2
57   A Oliver (GBR) 0 0 1 0
40   I Rochmawati (INA) 2 2 1 2
25   Y Fang (CHN) 1 1 2 0 0
40   I Rochmawati (INA) 1 1 0 2 2
40   I Rochmawati (INA) 2 1 2 0 0 0
9   K Perova (RUS) 0 1 0 2 2 1
9   K Perova (RUS) 2 2 2
56   N Kamel (EGY) 0 0 0
9   K Perova (RUS) 2 2 0 2
24   N Valeeva (ITA) 0 0 2 0
24   N Valeeva (ITA) 0 2 1 2 2
41   U Kwon (PRK) 2 0 1 0 0

Section 2Edit

Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarter-finals
                                
4   K Lorig (USA) 2 2 2
61   S Zam (BHU) 0 0 0
4   K Lorig (USA) 2 0 1 2 1
36   L Laursen (DEN) 0 2 1 0 1
29   M-P Beaudet (CAN) 1 0 0 2 0
36   L Laursen (DEN) 1 2 2 0 2
4   K Lorig (USA) 2 1 0 2 2
20   M Cheng (CHN) 0 1 2 0 0
13   A Valencia (MEX) 2 1 2 2
52   R Pärnat (EST) 0 1 0 0
13   A Valencia (MEX) 0 0 1 0
20   M Cheng (CHN) 2 2 1 2
20   M Cheng (CHN) 2 0 0 2 2
45   L Brito (VEN) 0 2 2 0 0
4   K Lorig (USA) 2 0 2 2
37   B Schuh (FRA) 0 2 0 0
5   C-E Lin (TPE) 0 2 2 2
60   N Hashim (MAS) 2 0 0 0
5   C-E Lin (TPE) 2 0 0 1 2 0
37   B Schuh (FRA) 0 2 2 1 0 1
28   K Kawanaka (JPN) 2 0 0 0
37   B Schuh (FRA) 0 2 2 2
37   B Schuh (FRA) 2 1 2 0 0 1
21   H-J Choi (KOR) 0 1 0 2 2 0
12   A Rendón (COL) 0 2 0 0
53   I Grandal (ESP) 2 0 2 2
53   I Grandal (ESP) 0 1 0 2 2 0
21   H-J Choi (KOR) 2 1 2 0 0 1
21   H-J Choi (KOR) 0 1 2 0 2 1
44   J Tomasi (ITA) 2 1 0 2 0 0

Section 3Edit

Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarter-finals
                                
3   Y-T Tan (TPE) 1 2 1 0 2
62   N Dielen (SUI) 1 0 1 2 0
3   Y-T Tan (TPE) 2 2 0 2
30   E Richter (GER) 0 0 2 0
30   E Richter (GER) 0 0 2 2 1 1
35   M Jager (DEN) 2 2 0 0 1 0
3   Y-T Tan (TPE) 0 2 0 0
19   P Lionetti (ITA) 2 0 2 2
19   P Lionetti (ITA) 2 2 0 2
46   K Hultzer (RSA) 0 0 2 0
19   P Lionetti (ITA) 2 0 1 1 2
14   M Leek (USA) 0 2 1 1 0
14   M Leek (USA) 2 2 1 1
51   K Palekha (UKR) 0 0 1 1
19   P Lionetti (ITA) 2 0 0 0
11   A Román (MEX) 0 2 2 2
6   M Kanie (JPN) 2 1 2 2
59   T Dorokhova (UKR) 0 1 0 0
6   M Kanie (JPN) 2 2 2
27   J Xu (CHN) 0 0 0
27   J Xu (CHN) 2 2 0 2
38   N Leśniak (POL) 0 0 2 0
6   M Kanie (JPN) 1 2 0 0 0
11   A Román (MEX) 1 0 2 2 2
22   B Devi (IND) 0 2 2 1 1
43   E Psarra (GRE) 2 0 0 1 1
22   B Devi (IND) 0 2 0 0
11   A Román (MEX) 2 0 2 2
11   A Román (MEX) 2 2 0 2
54   A Bannova (KAZ) 0 0 2 0

Section 4Edit

Round of 64 Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarter-finals
                                
7   C Christiansen (DEN) 0 2 1 2 2
58   E Barnard (AUS) 2 0 1 0 0
7   C Christiansen (DEN) 1 2 0 1 2
39   C-Y Le (TPE) 1 0 2 1 0
26   B Löklüoğlu (TUR) 0 0 0
39   C-Y Le (TPE) 2 2 2
7   C Christiansen (DEN) 0 2 0 0
10   M Avitia (MEX) 2 0 2 2
23   K Timofeeva (RUS) 2 0 2 0 0
42   N Folkard (GBR) 0 2 0 2 2
42   N Folkard (GBR) 1 0 0 1
10   M Avitia (MEX) 1 2 2 1
10   M Avitia (MEX) 1 2 1 2
55   Z Dehghan (IRI) 1 0 1 0
10   M Avitia (MEX) 0 2 2 2
2   S-J Lee (KOR) 2 0 0 0
15   J Nichols (USA) 0 2 1 0 2 1
50   C Swuro (IND) 2 0 1 2 0 0
15   J Nichols (USA) 1 2 1 0 0
18   U Bishindee (MGL) 1 0 1 2 2
18   U Bishindee (MGL) 0 1 2 2 2
47   A Williamson (GBR) 2 1 0 0 0
18   U Bishindee (MGL) 0 0 0
2   S-J Lee (KOR) 2 2 2
31   D Lamoen (CHI) 0 0 0
34   K Esebua (GEO) 2 2 2
34   K Esebua (GEO) 0 0 2 0
2   S-J Lee (KOR) 2 2 0 2
2   S-J Lee (KOR) 2 2 2
63   Tuimalealiifano (SAM) 0 0 0

FinalsEdit

Semi-finals Finals
                
1   Ki Bo-Bae (KOR) 1 2 1 2
4   Khatuna Lorig (USA) 1 0 1 0
1   Ki Bo-Bae (KOR) 2 1 0 2 0 1
11   Aída Román (MEX) 0 1 2 0 2 0
11   Aída Román (MEX) 2 1 1 2
10   Mariana Avitia (MEX) 0 1 1 0 Third place
4   Khatuna Lorig (USA) 0 0 2 0
10   Mariana Avitia (MEX) 2 2 0 2

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Places are assigned to the NOCs, which decide on the archers who will represent the nation at the event.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Korean archers set to run over rivals". The Korea Herald. Reuters. 10 July 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  2. ^ Stanley, John (31 March 2016). "Best Olympic Archers of All-Time: #15 Zhang JuanJuan". World Archery. Retrieved 4 August 2019.
  3. ^ Monaghan, Matt (20 July 2012). "London 2012: Secrets behind South Korea's archery success". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 22 July 2019.
  4. ^ "JUNG takes gold at the London Archery Classic". Lausanne: World Archery. 9 October 2011. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  5. ^ "London 2012 Olympics qualifying: Archery". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. 3 January 2011. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  6. ^ "Entries by NOC" (PDF). World Archery. 27 July 2012. p. 5-8. Retrieved 1 August 2012.
  7. ^ "Women's Individual - Individual Competition Format". London 2012 Organising Committee. Archived from the original on 23 July 2012. Retrieved 13 June 2012.
  8. ^ Tekmitchov, George (14 June 2010). "The Set System—a new era in World Archery competition". World Archery. Retrieved 4 August 2019.
  9. ^ "London 2012 Olympics: Archery schedule". The Daily Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. 15 February 2011. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  10. ^ "World Archery Records". World Archery. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  11. ^ "Record for Park as Brits impress". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. 9 August 2008. Retrieved 26 July 2019.
  12. ^ Rutherford, Peter (27 July 2012). "Korea women archers on target but U.S. in the hunt". Reuters. Retrieved 4 August 2019.
  13. ^ Shin, Hyun-hee (28 July 2012). "S. Korea men, women earn high seeds in archery". The Korea Herald. Yonhap News Agency. Retrieved 4 August 2019.
  14. ^ Dollard, Rory (27 July 2012). "Archery: Team GB women disappoint in ranking round". The Independent. Press Association. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  15. ^ "Indian challenge ends with Deepika's shock exit". The Hindu. Press Trust of India. 2 August 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  16. ^ "Olympics Archery: Amy Oliver out in last 32 despite shock win". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. 1 August 2012. Retrieved 27 July 2019.
  17. ^ Winch, Jessica (31 July 2012). "London 2012 Olympics: Alison Williamson and Naomi Folkard crash out of the archery". The Daily Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Retrieved 27 July 2019.
  18. ^ Butler, Eddie (1 August 2012). "Bhutan bow out of London Olympics after archery defeat". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 4 August 2019.
  19. ^ "JO de Londres: Schuh cale en quart, l'Or pour Ki Bo Bae, l'Argent et le Bronze pour les Mexicaines Roman et Avitia" [London Olympics: Schuh held in quarterfinals, Gold for Ki Bo Bae, Silver and Bronze for Mexicans Roman and Avitia]. Fédération Française de Tir à L'Arc (in French). 2 August 2012. Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  20. ^ a b "Archery Key Facts and Numbers". World Archery. 2 August 2012. Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  21. ^ Kilgore, Camille; Brooks, Matt (2 August 2012). "Day 6: Women's gymnastics all-around, Phelps vs. Lochte". The Washington Post. 10:13am. Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  22. ^ a b Hamilton, Tracee (2 August 2012). "Ki Bo Bae wins archery gold; American Khatuna Lorig falters late to lose bronze". The Washington Post. Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  23. ^ a b Rutherford, Peter (2 August 2012). "Archery: Korean Ki wins gold in final shoot-off". Reuters. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  24. ^ "Olimpiadas 2012: Mexicanas hacen el 2-3 histórico en tiro con arco (fotos)" [2012 Olympics: Mexicanas make historic 2-3 in archery (photos)]. La Opinión (in Spanish). Agencia EFE. 2 August 2012. Retrieved 4 August 2019.
  25. ^ a b Butler, Eddie (12 August 2012). "The story of London 2012: Guardian writers' Olympic Games review". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 27 July 2019.
  26. ^ "Archery Women's Individual Ranking Round Results" (PDF). World Archery. 27 July 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2019.

External linksEdit