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Archery at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's individual

The women's individual archery event at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 5 August to 13 August at the Sambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. One of four archery events as part of the 2016 Olympic catalogue of sports, it was the fourteenth time a women's individual competition was contested as a discipline at the Olympic Games. Forty different nations qualified for the event, sending a total of sixty-four archers to compete. The defending Olympic champion was Ki Bo-bae of South Korea.

Women's individual
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Rio 2016 - Men's archery finals (29229287682).jpg
The Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro's Cidade Nova neighbourhood hosted the event.
VenueSambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí
Date5–11 August 2016
Competitors64 from 40 nations
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Chang Hye-jin  South Korea
2nd, silver medalist(s) Lisa Unruh  Germany
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Ki Bo-bae  South Korea
← 2012
2020 →

South Korea's three archers were tipped for success, the nation having won all but one of the event's gold medals since the 1984 Summer Olympics. Ki and her South Korean teammates Choi Mi-sun and Chang Hye-jin dominated the initial ranking round and secured the top three seeds for the elimination rounds, entering the knockout phase having also won gold medal in the women's team event. Choi, who entered ranked as the world's number one archer, was however eliminated in the quarter-finals by Alejandra Valencia of Mexico; world number two Tan Ya-ting of Chinese Taipei, another favourite for the gold medal, also fell at the same stage. Chang defeated Ki in the semi-finals, contesting the final with Germany's Lisa Unruh. Chang emerged victorious, winning her second gold medal of the Games, while Ki prevailed over Valencia in the bronze medal match, securing her fourth career Olympic medal.

Chang's gold medal victory continued South Korea's near-domination of the event. Archery became South Korea's most successful Olympic discipline, while Unruh's silver medal gave Germany its first Olympic archery medal in sixteen years.

BackgroundEdit

 
Ki Bo-bae (pictured at the 2012 Summer Olympics) was the defending Olympic champion.

The women's individual event has been held as part of every Summer Olympics archery programme since the reintroduction of the sport at the 1972 Games in Munich; individual competitions for women had also previously been held at the 1904 and 1908 Summer Olympics. Heading into the Rio 2016 event archers from South Korea had been the most successful overall with seven gold medal victories, success coming particularly from the 1984 Summer Olympics onwards. The United States were ranked second in number of gold medals with four, with Great Britain, the Soviet Union and China having won one apiece.

At the previous Olympic Games held at Lord's Cricket Ground in London, Ki Bo-bae won the gold medal, reclaiming the Olympic title for South Korea after Zhang Juanjuan's victory on home soil at the 2008 Beijing Olympics interrupted a six-time winning streak for South Korea in the women's individual discipline.[1] Ki had narrowly defeated Mexico's Aída Román in a one-arrow shoot-off in the final, earning her a second Olympic gold medal following victory in the women's team event four days earlier. Román and her Mexican teammate Mariana Avitia, who had defeated Khatuna Lorig of the United States in the bronze medal match, became Mexico's first ever Olympic medal-winners in archery.[2]

An official test event, the Aquece Rio International Archery Challenge, was held over eight days at the Sambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí in September 2015. The purpose of the event was to evaluate the venue's preparations and give archers and coaches the chance to familiarise themselves with the location and schedule ahead of the Games the following year.[3] South Korea's Choi Mi-sun emerged victorious in the women's individual event by defeating Tan Ya-ting of Chinese Taipei in the final, with Mackenzie Brown of the United States third and Japan's Kaori Kawanaka finishing in fourth.[4]

QualificationEdit

Sixty-four places were available for the event with each National Olympic Committee (NOC) represented by a maximum of three archers. Thirty-three of these places were open for the eleven nations qualifying for the Olympic women's team event, the 2015 World Archery Championships' women's team recurve event held in Copenhagen acting as the primary qualifying tournament in awarding twenty-four places. Eight nations - China, Colombia, Georgia, India, Japan, South Korea, Mexico, and Russia - secured the maximum berth of archers as the highest-placed teams.[5] The remaining three team entries were decided at the Final Qualification Tournament held as part of the third stage of the 2016 Archery World Cup in Antalya, with Italy, Chinese Taipei, and Ukraine securing the final three-woman positions.[6] As the host of the 2016 Olympics, Brazil automatically qualified three places as the twelfth team nation.

The NOCs that were unsuccessful in winning a three-member team entry were each limited to qualifying one archer. Of the twenty-eight remaining qualification positions, eight were awarded to the NOCs of the highest-ranked archers at the 2015 World Archery Championships women's individual recurve event, fourteen to those at a series of qualifying tournaments organised by the continental archery federations, and three to those at the Final Qualification Tournament in Antalya. The final three places were awarded to NOCs that entered fewer than eight athletes in individual disciplines at the 2008 and 2012 Summer Olympics, the motivation being seek to increase representation from non-traditional archery nations as well as abiding by the universal representation ethos of the Olympic Charter.[7][8] The three NOCs selected were Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Myanmar.[5]

National selectionsEdit

 
Deepika Kumari (pictured in 2011) entered her second Olympic Games for India.

With the qualification positions for the Olympic event awarded to the NOCs of the successful archers, rather than the archers themselves, each NOC was free to choose its representatives through its own selection procedure.[5] Defending Olympic champion Ki was chosen alongside Olympic debutants Choi Mi-sun and Chang Hye-jin to head the South Korean squad. The three had placed highest in the Korean national team selection competition which concluded in April 2016, Chang beating Kang Chae-young into third-place having narrowly missed out on Olympic selection four years earlier.[9][10] Aída Román, the silver medalist from the 2012 Olympics, was joined by Gabriela Bayardo and 2011 Pan American Games champion Alejandra Valencia to spearhead the Mexcian team, with London 2012 bronze medalist Mariana Avitia failing to rank highly enough in the national selection procedure to contest a third Olympic Games.[11]

Several nations selected experienced Olympians. Great Britain's Naomi Folkard and Georgia's Khatuna Narimanidze and Kristine Esebua were all chosen to compete in their fourth Games, while Greece's selection of Evangelia Psarra made her the most experienced Olympian in the field, Psarra contesting her fifth consecutive Olympic Games.[12][13] The Chinese Taipei team featured one change from its London 2012 trio, Lin Shih-chia joining Tan Ya-ting and Le Chien-ying in what journalist John Stanley described as a "formidable" line-up.[14] Russia too made just one change, retaining Ksenia Perova and Inna Stepanova from their 2012 team and picking Tuyana Dashidorzhieva as their third entrant. Following the publication of the McLaren Report concerning allegations of state-sponsored doping of Russian athletes, the trio were approved and cleared to compete by the World Archery Federation in July 2016 having had no history of using performance-enhancing drugs.[15] India also selected two athletes from its 2012 squad for its three-woman contingent, former youth world champion Deepika Kumari and Laishram Bombayla Devi partnering Olympic newcomer Laxmirani Majhi in the country's latest attempt to secure its first Olympic archery medal.[16] In contrast, Italy's team of three was entirely new, Guendalina Sartori captaining the squad after the retirement of six-time Olympian Natalia Valeeva.[17] Brazil likewise featured three Olympic debutantes in its lineup, the performances Ane Marcelle dos Santos, Sarah Nikitin, and Marina Canetta in the second and third stages of the 2016 Archery World Cup meriting their selection for the host nation.[18]

Australia, Canada, and the United States were among those to send first-time Olympians as their sole representatives. Alice Ingley was promoted from her reserve role at the 2012 Olympics having shown good form at team selection camps, while Mackenzie Brown beat four-time Olympian Khatuna Lorig to victory at the US women's trials to secure her first Olympic berth.[19][20] Canada nominated Georcy-Stéphanie Picard, who had previously represented her country at the 2015 Pan American Games.[21] Zahra Nemati, the reigning Paralympic champion in the W1/W2 wheelchair discipline, was selected by Iran for her Olympic debut following her silver medal at the 2018 Asian Archery Championships. Nemati entered as the only archer competing in both the 2016 Summer Olympics and Paralympics.[22]

FormatEdit

 
An official World Archery target is divided into ten evenly-spaced concentric rings. The central black-lined ring, worth 10 points, is further divided into an outer and inner ring. The number of arrows landing within these two rings is used as a tiebreaker in the ranking round.

The women's individual was an outdoor target archery event using recurve bows. Held under World Archery-approved rules, archers shot at a 122 cm-wide target from a distance of 70 metres, each arrow earning between one and ten points depending on how close it landed to the centre of the target. The competition comprised an initial ranking round, five elimination rounds, and two finals matches which decided the winners of the gold, silver, and bronze medals. In the ranking round, which took place on 5 August, each of the 64 archers entering the competition shot a total of 72 arrows. The total score of each archer was used to seed the archers into the following five-round single-elimination tournament, the highest-scoring archer receiving the number one seed. If two or more archers finished with the same total score, the number of arrows shot in the central 10-ring on the target was used as a tie-breaker. If two or more archers were still tied, then the number of arrows shot within the inner-10 ring determined the finishing positions. If the archers still could still not be separated then a disk toss was to be employed to decide the final order.[23]:5

The elimination rounds and medal matches, held over four days from 8 to 11 August, used the Archery Olympic Round set system introduced at the 2012 Summer Olympics. Each match consisted of a maximum of five sets, with archers each shooting three arrows per set. The archer with the best score from their three arrows won the set, earning two set points. The archer with the lowest score in each set received zero set points. If the score was tied, each archer received one set point. The first archer to set six points was declared the winner. If the match was tied at five set points apiece after the maximum five sets were played, each archer shot one more arrow with the one shooting closest to centre of the target winning.[24]

ScheduleEdit

Day Date Time Phase
Day 0 Friday 5 August 2016 13:00 Ranking round
Day 3 Monday 8 August 2016 09:00-17:45 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Day 4 Tuesday 9 August 2016 09:00-17:45 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Day 5 Wednesday 10 August 2016 09:00-18:55 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Day 6 Thursday 11 August 2016 09:00-17:10 1/8 Eliminations
Quarter-finals
Semi-finals
Bronze medal match
Gold medal match
All times are Brasília Time (UTC−03:00)
Source:

ReportEdit

Pre-eventEdit

 
Tan Ya-Ting (pictured at the 2019 Archery World Cup) entered as one of the favourites to compete for an Olympic medal.

With South Korea's long-established record of success in the women's individual event, the trio of Ki Bo-bae, Chang Hye-jin, and Choi Mi-sun entered as favourites to challenge for the gold medal. Several commentators, including commentator George Tekmitchov, compound archer Sara Lopez, and World Archery journalist Andrea Vasquez tipped either Ki or Choi claim the Olympic crown, with Jane Zorowitz of NBC predicting that Choi was Ki's biggest obstacle to retaining her Olympic title.[25][26] Vinica Weiss of Sports Illustrated wrote that all three Korean women had an equal chance of finishing on the podium.[27]

The archers from Chinese Taipei featured in many predictions for medals, with broadcast commentator Carl Arky praising Tan Ya-ting and Lei Chien-ying, commenting that both had the potential to successfully challenge the Korean archers. Arky selected Tan as his favourite for Olympic champion.[25] Zorowitz also listed Tan and Lei as serious medal challengers, and Ki herself was wary of the challenge posed by the Chinese Taipei team.[26][28]

Peter Rutherford of Reuters suggested that the rising number of archery teams employing Korean coaches would increase the number of contenders for the Olympic crown.[28] Former Olympians Juan René Serrano and Natalia Valeeva picked Aída Román and Deepika Kumari as their respective favourites for the gold medal, with Weiss also listing Ksenia Perova as one of her athletes to watch.[27]

Ranking roundEdit

The event began on the afternoon of Friday 5 August with the 72-arrow ranking round. Choi topped the leaderboard with a score of 669 points out of a maximum of 720, beating teammates Chang Hye-jin and Ki Bo-bae who ranked second and third with 666 and 663 points respectively. By earning the top three seeds for the elimination rounds the trio delayed any potential intra-team match-ups until the semi-finals at the earliest.[29] Choi had begun strongly and was on course to surpass Lina Herasymenko's twenty-year-old Olympic record of 673 points before breezy conditions developed mid-way through the round and halted her progress. Speaking afterwards Choi commented that despite the weather she was happy with the performances of both herself and her teammates, saying "[w]e have the best players, we have talent and skill. It’s so windy that people can get overwhelmed, but we (did) well in the end."[30]

Citing a busy schedule, the Indian archers elected to skip the opening ceremony, which took place later in the evening of 5 August, to fully concentrate on the ranking round.[31] Deepika Kumari and Bombayla Devi Laishram both made promising starts that afternoon, and by the halfway point Kumari was placed fifth and Laishram had risen as high as eighth. Inconsistent shooting from both however saw them fall away from the leaders over the final thirty-six arrows, Kumari concluding the round in 20th place with 640 points, while Laishram finished four places below on 638 points. The Indo-Asian News Service however summarised the Olympic debut of Laxmirani Majhi, the third member of the Indian team, as "disappointing", Mahji ending on 614 points in 43rd place.[32]

In analysing the potential match-ups ahead of the three Italian archers, Michele Cassano of OA Sport was optimistic following Lucilla Boari's seventh-placed finish with 651 points, but was more ambivalent about thirteenth-seed Guendalina Sartori, whose path to the latter stages of the competition included Kumari and Georgia's Kristine Esebua. He however likened Claudia Mandia's path to the circles of hell in Dante's Inferno, the Italian scoring 612 points to finish forty-sixth and entering the elimination rounds in the same bracket as Mackenzie Brown, Finland's Taru Kuoppa, and reigning Olympic champion Ki.[33]

Elimination roundsEdit

After a two-day break over the weekend, in which the men's and women's team events were contested, the women's individual competition resumed on the morning of Monday, 8 August for the beginning of the elimination rounds. Held concurrently with the same stages of the men's individual competition, the 1/32 and 1/16 eliminations lasted until Wednesday 10 August.

8 AugustEdit

 
Mackenzie Brown (pictured in 2015) entered as world number four but lost in the second elimination round.

Monday saw Ki in action, the defending champion winning her first two matches without dropping a set to advance to the last sixteen against Myanmar's San Yu Htwe. Hwte, who entered the competition through Myanmar's invitational place and who had finished the ranking round in 51st position, pulled off two surprise results in a row by defeating both fourteenth-seed Taru Kuoppa and nineteenth-seed Mackenzie Brown by seven set points to three, conceding just one set in each match.[34] Ki's opponent in the final at the 2012 Olympics, Aída Román, was however unable to replicate her run from London four years previously, the defending silver medalist falling to Moldova's Alexandra Mîrca in the 1/32 elimination round. Despite being seeded eleven places lower than Mîrca, the Mexican's loss was still regarded as an upset, with Notimex concluding that her performance at the Games fell below expectations. Román cited the wind as her biggest difficulty on a day that saw greater wind gusts than on the previous day.[34][35]

Seventh-seed Lucilla Boari was another archer who suffered a surprise opening-round defeat on the Monday, losing to the Australian fifty-eighth seed Alice Ingley seven set points to one in the day's afternoon session. Boari's defeat was the second endured by an Italian archer that day, Mandia having earlier succumbed to Brown in the 1/32 elimination round. Francesco Lionetti of the Italian website Sportface blamed the defeats on the mood of disappointment in the Italian camp following the women's team event the day before, with Boari, Mandia, and Sartori having narrowly missed out on a bronze medal against Chinese Taipei.[36] Ingley, who was ranked 329 places lower than the Boari in the World Archery rankings prior to the Games, was herself eliminated later in the day by Brazil's Ane Marcelle dos Santos in the 1/16 elimination round. dos Santos had earlier defeated Saori Nagamine of Japan, breaking down in tears as the home crowd gave her a standing ovation.[37]

9 AugustEdit

The second day of the elimination rounds on Tuesday 9 August saw fewer surprises. Jane Zorowitz of NBC summarised that the day saw "no huge upsets, and for the most part, those whom were believed to move on to the next rounds did."[38] Iran's Zahra Nemati, the sole Paralympian in the competition, had the support of the crowd in her opening bout against Russia's Inna Stepanova, but despite a strong start ultimately lost by six set points to two. Speaking to the media after the match, Nemati described the Olympic competition as a far more stressful experience than that of the Paralympics.[22] Stepanova advanced to meet fellow Russian Ksenia Perova in the 1/16 elimination round, Stepanova defeating her compatriot in the all-Russian tie by seven set points to three to progress into the last sixteen.[38]

11 AugustEdit

The event concluded on 11 August, beginning with the 1/8 elimination round. Brazil's Ane Marcelle dos Santos achieved the host nation's highest ever finish in an Olympic archery competition by reaching the last sixteen, finishing in ninth place in the final standings.[39] Naomi Folkard of Great Britain also achieved a personal best in reaching the quarter-finals for the first time on her fourth attempt.[40] World number one Choi was however not able progress any further than the quarter-finals, losing in straight sets to double Pan American champion and eighth-seed Alejandra Valencia of Mexico in what was considered a major upset. Choi failed to recover after scoring only a five with her first arrow of the match, commenting afterwards that "I couldn't focus on myself today."[41]

Choi's teammates Chang and Ki met in the semifinals. As the defending champion Ki was the favourite to advance in her bid to become the event's first back-to-back gold medalist, but Chang overcame a poor start - which included scoring a three with her second arrow - to win in five sets and progress to the final.[42] Chang was joined in the gold medal match by Lisa Unruh of Germany, the reigning World Archery Indoor Champion. Unruh was a surprise finalist and later admitted she had had a disappointing ranking round in finishing 21st overall. Nevertheless, after three wins in the first three elimination rounds she defied expectations by defeating fourth-seed and world number two Tan Ya-ting in a quarter-final shoot-off before beating Alejandra Valencia in the semi-finals to face off against Chang.[43][44]

Medal matchesEdit

 
Chang Hye-jin (pictured at the 2014 Asian Games) won the gold medal after defeating Lisa Unruh in the final.

As the two losing semi-finalists, Ki met Valencia in the bronze medal match, the latter shooting for Mexico's first medal of the Games. Ki however prevailed in four sets to earn her fourth career Olympic medal, the second highest tally for a South Korean archer after Kim Soo-nyung's six medals won between 1988 and 2000.[39] Valencia nevertheless earned her highest finishing position in an world competition to date with fourth overall.[45]

In the gold medal final Chang and Unruh each started well, winning one of the opening two sets apiece. Chang won the third set after Unruh faltered by shooting a seven, claiming the fourth set shortly afterwards by scoring two tens and a nine that Unruh could not overcome, earning Chang the victory and her first Olympic medal.[46] The Associated Press praised Chang as a "pillar of consistency" amid wind gusts that made aiming difficult.[41]

Chang's win was her second gold medal of the 2016 Olympics following South Korea's success in the women's team competition earlier in the week; she became the eighth female South Korean archer to win an Olympic gold medal in an individual event.[46] It was also South Korea's third gold medal of the Games and the nation's twenty-second Olympic archery gold medal overall, overtaking the twenty-one gold medals earned in short track speed skating at the Winter Olympics to become the country's most successful Olympic sport.[39] Chang's two gold medals earned her the top female athlete prize at the 2016 Korea Woman Sports Awards.[47]

Unruh's silver medal was Germany's first ever individual archery Olympic medal, and Germany's first archery medal since the German women's team won bronze at the 2000 Summer Olympics.[44]

RecordsEdit

  • 70 metres - 72 arrow ranking round
Archer Score Location Date Ref
World record   Ki Bo-bae (KOR) 686 Gwangju, South Korea 4 July 2015 [48]
Olympic record   Lina Herasymenko (UKR) 673 Atlanta, United States 28 July 1996

The world record score for a 72-arrow round had been improved since the 2012 Summer Olympics, with Ki Bo-bae setting a new record score during the women's individual recurve event at the 2015 Summer Universiade in Gwangju. Ki's total of 686 surpassed the previous highest tally set by compatriot Park Sung-hyun by four points, breaking a record that had stood for more than 10 years.[49] The Olympic record score of 673 was set by Ukraine's Lina Herasymenko at the 1996 Summer Olympics and was later matched by Park at the 2008 Summer Olympics.[50]

Neither record was broken at the 2016 Olympics.

ResultsEdit

Ranking roundEdit

Rank Archer Half Score 10s Xs
1st 2nd
1   Choi Mi-sun (KOR) 334 335 669 32 16
2   Chang Hye-jin (KOR) 336 330 666 31 7
3   Ki Bo-bae (KOR) 329 334 663 33 14
4   Tan Ya-ting (TPE) 332 324 656 32 10
5   Tuyana Dashidorzhieva (RUS) 322 332 654 32 6
6   Wu Jiaxin (CHN) 325 328 653 25 10
7   Lucilla Boari (ITA) 325 326 651 27 11
8   Alejandra Valencia (MEX) 328 323 651 22 7
9   Lin Shih-chia (TPE) 326 325 651 21 6
10   Kaori Kawanaka (JPN) 319 331 650 27 7
11   Qi Yuhong (CHN) 327 322 649 25 5
12   Gabriela Bayardo (MEX) 323 325 648 25 6
13   Guendalina Sartori (ITA) 323 325 648 21 9
14   Taru Kuoppa (FIN) 316 327 643 24 10
15   Kang Un-ju (PRK) 327 316 643 22 8
16   Inna Stepanova (RUS) 322 321 643 19 8
17   Ksenia Perova (RUS) 315 326 641 24 5
18   Ana Rendón (COL) 326 315 641 23 7
19   Mackenzie Brown (USA) 321 320 641 22 9
20   Deepika Kumari (IND) 329 311 640 24 10
21   Lisa Unruh (GER) 315 325 640 24 7
22   Alexandra Longová (SVK) 318 322 640 19 8
23   Naomi Folkard (GBR) 322 317 639 25 8
24   Bombayla Devi Laishram (IND) 327 311 638 23 7
25   Yasemin Ecem Anagöz (TUR) 320 318 638 21 6
26   Ane Marcelle dos Santos (BRA) 329 308 637 24 7
27   Alexandra Mîrca (MDA) 321 315 636 23 8
28   Cao Hui (CHN) 325 306 631 16 6
29   Anastasia Pavlova (UKR) 319 311 630 24 6
30   Veronika Marchenko (UKR) 316 314 630 21 6
31   Lidiia Sichenikova (UKR) 319 311 630 21 2
32   Adriana Martín (ESP) 315 315 630 17 6
33   Le Chien-ying (TPE) 318 307 625 20 7
34   Khatuna Narimanidze (GEO) 314 311 625 20 6
35   Laura Nurmsalu (EST) 312 313 625 16 6
36   Luiza Saidiyeva (KAZ) 316 309 625 12 3
37   Olga Senyuk (AZE) 311 312 623 18 3
38   Aída Román (MEX) 313 310 623 15 7
39   Saori Nagamine (JPN) 313 308 621 18 4
40   Karina Lipiarska-Pałka (POL) 308 312 620 10 4
41   Laurence Baldauff (AUT) 313 306 619 16 3
42   Ika Yuliana Rochmawati (INA) 315 302 617 15 2
43   Laxmirani Majhi (IND) 306 308 614 13 3
44   Leidys Brito (VEN) 309 305 614 9 3
45   Kristine Esebua (GEO) 301 311 612 20 5
46   Claudia Mandia (ITA) 307 305 612 19 6
47   Christine Bjerendal (SWE) 305 306 611 11 3
48   Natalia Sánchez (COL) 314 295 609 16 6
49   Zahra Nemati (IRI) 305 304 609 12 4
50   Sarah Nikitin (BRA) 305 304 609 11 3
51   San Yu Htwe (MYA) 306 302 608 16 8
52   Carolina Aguirre (COL) 299 306 605 13 4
53   Shamoli Ray (BAN) 303 297 600 11 4
54   Marina Canetta (BRA) 303 296 599 14 2
55   Evangelia Psarra (GRE) 313 283 596 12 4
56   Reem Mansour (EGY) 300 296 596 12 3
57   Yuliya Lobzhenidze (GEO) 306 288 594 12 4
58   Alice Ingley (AUS) 304 289 593 9 1
59   Yuki Hayashi (JPN) 298 293 591 7 5
60   Karma (BHU) 300 288 588 9 0
61   Georcy-Stéphanie Picard (CAN) 297 288 585 11 1
62   Shehzana Anwar (KEN) 290 289 579 9 2
63   Lusitania Tatafu (TGA) 276 283 559 10 3
64   Yessica Camilo (DOM) 275 250 525 5 1
Source:[23]:34-35

Elimination roundsEdit

Section 1Edit

1/32 eliminations 1/16 eliminations 1/8 eliminations Quarter-finals
                                
1   M-s Choi (KOR) 6 28 27 28
64   Y Camilo (DOM) 0 20 23 25
1   M-s Choi (KOR) 6 29 28 29 27
33   C-y Le (TPE) 2 29 26 28 27
33   C-y Le (TPE) 6 25 28 27 27
32   A Martín (ESP) 2 27 26 25 26
1   M-s Choi (KOR) 7 27 27 28 28 28
16   I Stepanova (RUS) 3 26 29 27 28 27
17   K Perova (RUS) 6 26 25 28 27 24
48   N Sánchez (COL) 4 25 29 19 27 24
17   K Perova (RUS) 3 25 27 24 29 26
16   I Stepanova (RUS) 7 26 26 30 29 27
49   Z Nemati (IRI) 2 21 28 26 26
16   I Stepanova (RUS) 6 28 27 28 27
1   M-s Choi (KOR) 0 23 26 27
8   A Valencia (MEX) 6 25 29 29
9   S-c Lin (TPE) 6 28 26 25
56   R Mansour (EGY) 0 17 21 17
9   S-c Lin (TPE) 2 24 24 27 26
24   BD Laishram (IND) 6 27 27 26 28
41   L Baldauff (AUT) 2 27 23 23 24
24   BD Laishram (IND) 6 24 28 27 25
24   BD Laishram (IND) 2 26 26 27 23
8   A Valencia (MEX) 6 28 23 28 25
25   YE Anagöz (TUR) 6* 26 23 22 30 26
40   K Lipiarska-Pałka (POL) 5 22 23 23 27 27
25   YE Anagöz (TUR) 5 28 26 28 28 26
8   A Valencia (MEX) 6* 28 28 28 27 26
57   Y Lobzhenidze (GEO) 4 28 28 26 27 27
8   A Valencia (MEX) 6 25 27 27 28 29

Section 2Edit

1/32 eliminations 1/16 eliminations 1/8 eliminations Quarter-finals
                                
5   T Dashidorzhieva (RUS) 7 26 28 26 27 28
60   Karma (BHU) 3 26 22 26 27 21
5   T Dashidorzhieva (RUS) 4 28 25 28 25 29
28   H Cao (CHN) 6 28 29 27 27 29
37   O Senyuk (AZE) 1 23 25 23 26
28   H Cao (CHN) 7 28 25 24 27
28   H Cao (CHN) 2 27 26 29 26
21   L Unruh (GER) 6 28 29 28 29
21   L Unruh (GER) 6 28 27 22 27 27
44   L Brito (VEN) 4 25 25 24 28 24
21   L Unruh (GER) 6 29 27 26 25 28
12   G Bayardo (MEX) 4 27 26 27 27 26
53   S Ray (BAN) 0 27 23 25
12   G Bayardo (MEX) 6 28 28 28
21   L Unruh (GER) 6* 25 28 27 28 26
4   Y-t Tan (TPE) 5 27 26 28 26 26
13   G Sartori (ITA) 6 29 27 28
52   C Aguirre (COL) 0 24 23 25
13   G Sartori (ITA) 2 27 26 26 27
20   D Kumari (IND) 6 24 29 28 28
45   K Esebua (GEO) 4 26 29 27 29 29
20   D Kumari (IND) 6 27 29 30 27 29
20   D Kumari (IND) 0 27 26 27
4   Y-t Tan (TPE) 6 28 29 30
29   A Pavlova (UKR) 6 28 29 29
36   L Saidiyeva (KAZ) 0 22 26 24
29   A Pavlova (UKR) 0 26 27 25
4   Y-t Tan (TPE) 6 27 29 29
61   G-S Picard (CAN) 1 27 25 26 24
4   Y-t Tan (TPE) 7 29 26 26 28

Section 3Edit

1/32 eliminations 1/16 eliminations 1/8 eliminations Quarter-finals
                                
3   B-b Ki (KOR) 7 26 26 26 27
62   S Anwar (KEN) 1 24 23 26 26
3   B-b Ki (KOR) 6 29 27 29 29
30   V Marchenko (UKR) 2 27 27 29 25
35   L Nurmsalu (EST) 0 22 23 21
30   V Marchenko (UKR) 6 27 25 26
3   B-b Ki (KOR) 6 27 29 29
51   SY Htwe (MYA) 0 26 17 27
19   M Brown (USA) 6 26 29 28 28 28
46   C Mandia (ITA) 4 27 29 26 28 22
19   M Brown (USA) 3 26 26 26 26 25
51   SY Htwe (MYA) 7 26 28 30 25 27
51   SY Htwe (MYA) 7 26 26 26 27 27
14   T Kuoppa (FIN) 3 25 28 26 25 25
3   B-b Ki (KOR) 6 28 25 27 29
6   J Wu (CHN) 2 27 28 22 26
11   Y Qi (CHN) 7 28 27 28 30
54   M Canetta (BRA) 1 25 27 25 26
11   Y Qi (CHN) 6 29 28 27
22   A Longová (SVK) 0 27 26 24
43   L Majhi (IND) 1 25 26 26 24
22   A Longová (SVK) 7 27 28 26 27
11   Y Qi (CHN) 5 25 27 28 27 28
6   J Wu (CHN) 6* 26 29 28 26 27
27   A Mîrca (MDA) 6 27 25 28 26 27
38   A Román (MEX) 4 25 29 25 26 27
27   A Mîrca (MDA) 0 25 23 24
6   J Wu (CHN) 6 26 25 27
59   Y Hayashi (JPN) 1 22 24 25 27
6   J Wu (CHN) 7 22 28 27 28

Section 4Edit

1/32 eliminations 1/16 eliminations 1/8 eliminations Quarter-finals
                                
7   L Boari (ITA) 1 25 25 22 20
58   A Ingley (AUS) 7 25 28 23 24
58   A Ingley (AUS) 0 23 24 24
26   AM dos Santos (BRA) 6 25 26 26
39   S Nagamine (JPN) 3 28 25 19 25 19
26   AM dos Santos (BRA) 7 27 29 24 25 22
26   AM dos Santos (BRA) 2 25 27 25 20
23   N Folkard (GBR) 6 27 27 25 25
23   N Folkard (GBR) 6* 28 27 29 24 27
42   IY Rochmawati (INA) 5 27 25 29 26 28
23   N Folkard (GBR) 6 26 28 29
10   K Kawanaka (JPN) 0 22 26 26
55   E Psarra (GRE) 3 25 26 27 25 25
10   K Kawanaka (JPN) 7 25 29 26 26 29
23   N Folkard (GBR) 1 25 27 27 27
2   H-j Chang (KOR) 7 26 27 28 28
15   U-j Kang (PRK) 6 25 25 27
50   S Nikitin (BRA) 0 24 23 22
15   U-j Kang (PRK) 6 25 26 25 27
47   C Bjerendal (SWE) 2 26 25 23 25
47   C Bjerendal (SWE) 6 25 25 26 28
18   A Rendón (COL) 2 27 24 24 27
15   U-j Kang (PRK) 2 27 24 27 27
2   H-j Chang (KOR) 6 27 28 29 27
31   L Sichenikova (UKR) 7 25 25 27 28
34   K Narimanidze (GEO) 1 25 24 24 27
31   L Sichenikova (UKR) 2 27 28 28 25
2   H-j Chang (KOR) 6 28 29 26 28
63   L Tatafu (TGA) 0 23 15 23
2   H-j Chang (KOR) 6 28 27 27
  • Note: An asterisk (*) denotes a win from a one-arrow shoot-off

Source:[23]:31-32

FinalsEdit

Semi-finals Gold medal match
                
8   Alejandra Valencia (MEX) 2 26 26 25 26
21   Lisa Unruh (GER) 6 27 28 23 27
21   Lisa Unruh (GER)   2 26 28 26 27
2   Chang Hye-jin (KOR)   6 27 26 27 29
3   Ki Bo-bae (KOR) 3 25 24 24 26 26
2   Chang Hye-jin (KOR) 7 19 27 27 26 28 Bronze medal match
8   Alejandra Valencia (MEX) 4 25 29 25 27 25
3   Ki Bo-bae (KOR)   6 26 28 26 21 30

Source:[23]:30

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External linksEdit