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Archery at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's individual

The women's individual archery event at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 5 August to 13 August at Sambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. One of four archery events as part of the 2016 Olympic catalogue of sports, it was the twelfth time the women's individual competition was contested at the Games. Forty different nations qualified for the event, sending a total of sixty-four archers to compete. The defending Olympic champion was Ki Bo-bae of South Korea.[1]

Women's individual
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Rio 2016 - Men's archery finals (29229287682).jpg
The Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro's Cidade Nova neighbourhood hosted the event.
VenueSambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí
Date5–13 August 2016
Competitors64 from 40 nations
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Chang Hye-jin  South Korea
2nd, silver medalist(s) Lisa Unruh  Germany
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Ki Bo-bae  South Korea
← 2012
2020 →

South Korea's three archers were tipped for success, the nation having won all but one of the event's gold medals since the 1984 Summer Olympics. Ki and her South Korean teammates Choi Mi-sun and Chang Hye-jin dominated the initial ranking round and secured the top three seeds for the elimination rounds, entering the knockout phase having also won gold medal in the women's team event. Choi, who entered ranked as the world's number one archer, was however eliminated in the quarter-finals by Alejandra Valencia of Mexico; world number two Tan Ya-ting of Chinese Taipei, another favourite for the gold medal, also fell at the same stage. Chang defeated Ki in the semi-finals, contesting the final with Germany's Lisa Unruh. Chang emerged victorious, winning her second gold medal of the Games, while Ki prevailed over Valencia in the bronze medal match, securing her fourth career Olympic medal.

Chang's gold medal victory continued South Korea's near-domination of the event. Archery became South Korea's most successful Olympic discipline, while Unruh's silver medal gave Germany its first Olympic archery medal in sixteen years.

Contents

BackgroundEdit

The women's individual event has been held as part of every Summer Olympics archery programme since the 1972 Games in Munich. Since the 1984 Summer Olympics, archers from South Korea have been the most successful overall, with Ki Bo-bae's victory in 2012 claiming the nation's seventh gold medal in eight Olympic competitions. China are the only other nation to have won a gold medal since 1984, Zhang Juanjuan defeating defending Olympic champion Park Sung-hyun in the final in 2008.[2]

An official test event, the Aquece Rio International Archery Challenge, was held over eight days at the Sambadrome Marquês de Sapucaí in September 2015. The purpose of the event was to evaluate the venue's preparations and give archers and coaches the chance to familiarise themselves with the location and schedule ahead of the Games the following year.[3] South Korea's Choi Mi-sun emerged victorious in the women's individual event by defeating Tan Ya-ting of Chinese Taipei in the final, with Mackenzie Brown of the United States third and Japan's Kaori Kawanaka finishing in fourth.[4]

QualificationEdit

Sixty-four places were available for the event with each National Olympic Committee (NOC) represented by a maximum of three archers.[note 1] As host nation Brazil qualified three places automatically; China, Colombia, Georgia, India, Japan, South Korea, Mexico, and Russia additionally entered the maximum berth of archers through qualifying for the women's team event via the 2015 World Archery Championships.[5] Italy, Chinese Taipei, and Ukraine also qualified three archers as the three highest-placed teams in the Final Qualification Tournament held as part of the 2016 Archery World Cup in Antalya.[6] The remaining 28 spots were filled through a mixture of qualification from continental-level tournaments (for example, the Asian Archery Championships), placement in the individual World Rankings, and as invitational places.[7]

Two medalists from the 2012 Summer Olympics women's individual event, defending Olympic champion Ki Bo-bae and silver medalist Aída Román, were selected by their NOCs to return to defend their titles; 2012 bronze medalist Mariana Avitia failed to qualify in the Mexican national selection process.[8] Ki also entered as the defending world champion after her gold medal success at the 2015 World Archery Championships.[9] All archers ranked in the top ten in the World Archery rankings were selected to compete, Choi Mi-sun entering as the highest-ranked athlete at world number one. Australia's Alice Ingley was the lowest-ranked archer to take part at world number 353.[10]:13 The most experienced Olympian in the field was Evangelia Psarra of Greece, who was taking part in her fifth consecutive Games.[11] Zahra Nemati of Iran was the sole Paralympian to qualify, entering as the defending Paralympic champion from 2012 in the wheelchair event.[12]

FormatEdit

 
An official World Archery target is divided into ten evenly-spaced concentric rings. An arrow landing in the outermost ring wins one point; striking the centre yellow circle earns the maximum ten points.

The women's individual was an outdoor recurve target archery event. Held under the World Archery-approved rules, archers shot at a 122cm-wide target from a distance of 70 metres. The competition consisted of three stages: an initial ranking round, five elimination rounds, and two finals matches deciding the medal placings. In the ranking round, each of the 64 archers entering the competition shot a total of 72 arrows. The total cumulative score of each archer was used to seed the archers into the following five-round single-elimination tournament, the highest-scoring archer receiving the number one seed. If two or more archers finished with the same total score, the number of arrows shot in the central 10-ring on the target was used as a tie-breaker. If two or more archers were still tied, then the number of arrows shot within the inner-10 ring determined the finishing positions. If the archers still could still not be separated then a disk toss was to be employed to decide the final order.[10]:5

The elimination rounds used the Archery Olympic Round set system introduced at the 2012 Summer Olympics. Each match consisted of a maximum of five sets, with archers each shooting three arrows per set. The archer with the best score from their three arrows won the set, earning two points. The archer with the lowest score in each set received zero points. If the score was tied, each archer received one point. The first archer to six points was declared the winner. If the match was tied 5-5 after the maximum 5 sets were played, a single tie-breaker arrow was used with the closest to centre of the target winning.[13]

ScheduleEdit

Day Date Time Phase
Day 0 Friday 5 August 2016 13:00 Ranking round
Day 3 Monday 8 August 2016 09:00-17:45 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Day 4 Tuesday 9 August 2016 09:00-17:45 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Day 5 Wednesday 10 August 2016 09:00-18:55 1/32 & 1/16 Eliminations
Day 6 Thursday 11 August 2016 09:00-17:10 1/8 Eliminations
Quarter-finals
Semi-finals
Bronze medal match
Gold medal match
All times are Brasília Time (UTC−03:00)
Source:

RecordsEdit

  • 70 metres - 72 arrow ranking round
Archer Score Location Date Ref
World record   Ki Bo-bae (KOR) 686 Gwangju, South Korea 4 July 2015 [14]
Olympic record   Lina Herasymenko (UKR) 673 Atlanta, United States 28 July 1996

The world record score for a 72-arrow round at the beginning of the Games was held by Ki Bo-bae and set during the women's individual recurve event at the 2015 Summer Universiade in Gwangju. Her score of 686 surpassed the previous highest tally set by compatriot Park Sung-hyun by four points, breaking the record that had stood for more than 10 years.[15] The Olympic record score of 673 set by Ukraine's Lina Herasymenko at the 1996 Summer Olympics - and matched by Park at the 2008 Summer Olympics[16] - remained unbroken going into the Games.

ReportEdit

Ki Bo-bae, Deepika Kumari, Choi Mi-sun, Aída Román and Tan Ya-ting were tipped as the favourites to win gold medal prior to the start of the event.[17]

In the ranking round Choi was on course to beat Lina Herasymenko's Olympic record until the mid-point of the competition when a breeze developed and halted her progress.[18] Nevertheless, she and her teammates locked out the top three seeds, Choi topping the table scoring 669 points, three more than teammate Chang Hye-jin, who was a further three ahead of Ki Bo-bae, delaying any match-ups between them until the semi-finals at the earliest.[19]

 
Mackenzie Brown (pictured in 2015) entered as world number four but lost in the second elimination round.

The first elimination round saw the first upset of the competition, with 2012 silver medalist Román losing to Moldova's Alexandra Mîrca in five sets.[20] Other early surprises included Alice Ingley, the lowest ranked archer in the competition, defeating seventh-seed Lucilla Boari of Italy in the 1/32 elimination round and Mackenzie Brown, the sole American entry, lose to San Yu Htwe of Myanmar, who was ranked 187 places lower than Brown, in the 1/16 round.[21] Brazil's Ane Marcelle dos Santos achieved the host nation's highest ever finish in an Olympic archery competition, reaching the 1/8 elimination round and concluding the event in ninth place in the final standings.[22] Naomi Folkard of Great Britain also achieved a personal best in reaching the quarter-finals for the first time on her fourth attempt.[23] South Korea's Choi however was not able progress any further than the quarter-finals, losing in straight sets to eighth-seed Alejandra Valencia of Mexico in what was considered a major upset. Choi failed to recover after scoring only a five with her first arrow of the match, commenting afterwards that "I couldn't focus on myself today."[24]

Choi's Korean teammates Chang and Ki met in the semifinals. As the defending champion Ki was the favourite to advance in her bid to become the event's first back-to-back gold medalist, but Chang overcame a poor start - which included scoring a three with her second arrow - to win in five sets and progress to the final.[25] Chang was joined in the gold medal match by Lisa Unruh of Germany, the reigning World Archery Indoor Champion, who was a surprise finalist; Unruh later admitted she had had a disappointing ranking round in finshing 21st overall, but after three wins in the first three elimination rounds she defied expectations by defeating fourth-seed and world number two Tan Ya-ting in a quarter-final shoot-off and Alejandra Valencia in the semi-finals.[26][27]

As the two losing semi-finalists, Ki met Valencia in the bronze medal match, the latter shooting for Mexico's first medal of the Games. Ki however prevailed in four sets to earn her fourth career Olympic medal, the second highest tally for a South Korean archer after Kim Soo-nyung's six medals won between 1988 and 2000.[22] Valencia nevertheless earned her highest finishing position in an international competition to date with fourth overall.[28]

Chang Hye-jin (left, pictured in 2014) won the gold medal after defeating Lisa Unruh in the final. Defending champion Ki Bo-bae (right, pictured in 2012) won the bronze medal.

In the gold medal final Chang and Unruh each started well, winning one of the opening two sets apiece. Chang won the third set after Unruh faltered by shooting a seven, claiming the fourth set shortly afterwards by scoring two tens and a nine that Unruh could not overcome, earning Chang the victory and her first Olympic medal.[29] The Associated Press praised Chang as a "pillar of consistency" amid wind gusts that made aiming difficult.[24]

Chang's win was her second gold medal of the 2016 Olympics following South Korea's success in the women's team competition earlier in the week; she became the eighth female South Korean archer to win an Olympic gold medal in an individual event.[29] It was also South Korea's third gold medal of the Games and the nation's 22nd Olympic archery gold medal overall, overtaking the 21 gold medals earned in short-track ice skating at the Winter Olympics to become the country's most successful Olympic sport.[22] Chang's two gold medals earned her the top female athlete prize at the 2016 Korea Woman Sports Awards.[30]

Unruh's silver medal was Germany's first ever individual archery Olympic medal, and Germany's first archery medal since the German women's team won bronze at the 2000 Summer Olympics.[27]

ResultsEdit

Ranking roundEdit

Rank Archer Half Score 10s Xs
1st 2nd
1   Choi Mi-sun (KOR) 334 335 669 32 16
2   Chang Hye-jin (KOR) 336 330 666 31 7
3   Ki Bo-bae (KOR) 329 334 663 33 14
4   Tan Ya-ting (TPE) 332 324 656 32 10
5   Tuyana Dashidorzhieva (RUS) 322 332 654 32 6
6   Wu Jiaxin (CHN) 325 328 653 25 10
7   Lucilla Boari (ITA) 325 326 651 27 11
8   Alejandra Valencia (MEX) 328 323 651 22 7
9   Lin Shih-chia (TPE) 326 325 651 21 6
10   Kaori Kawanaka (JPN) 319 331 650 27 7
11   Qi Yuhong (CHN) 327 322 649 25 5
12   Gabriela Bayardo (MEX) 323 325 648 25 6
13   Guendalina Sartori (ITA) 323 325 648 21 9
14   Taru Kuoppa (FIN) 316 327 643 24 10
15   Kang Un-ju (PRK) 327 316 643 22 8
16   Inna Stepanova (RUS) 322 321 643 19 8
17   Ksenia Perova (RUS) 315 326 641 24 5
18   Ana Rendón (COL) 326 315 641 23 7
19   Mackenzie Brown (USA) 321 320 641 22 9
20   Deepika Kumari (IND) 329 311 640 24 10
21   Lisa Unruh (GER) 315 325 640 24 7
22   Alexandra Longová (SVK) 318 322 640 19 8
23   Naomi Folkard (GBR) 322 317 639 25 8
24   Bombayla Devi Laishram (IND) 327 311 638 23 7
25   Yasemin Ecem Anagöz (TUR) 320 318 638 21 6
26   Ane Marcelle dos Santos (BRA) 329 308 637 24 7
27   Alexandra Mîrca (MDA) 321 315 636 23 8
28   Cao Hui (CHN) 325 306 631 16 6
29   Anastasia Pavlova (UKR) 319 311 630 24 6
30   Veronika Marchenko (UKR) 316 314 630 21 6
31   Lidiia Sichenikova (UKR) 319 311 630 21 2
32   Adriana Martín (ESP) 315 315 630 17 6
33   Le Chien-ying (TPE) 318 307 625 20 7
34   Khatuna Narimanidze (GEO) 314 311 625 20 6
35   Laura Nurmsalu (EST) 312 313 625 16 6
36   Luiza Saidiyeva (KAZ) 316 309 625 12 3
37   Olga Senyuk (AZE) 311 312 623 18 3
38   Aída Román (MEX) 313 310 623 15 7
39   Saori Nagamine (JPN) 313 308 621 18 4
40   Karina Lipiarska-Pałka (POL) 308 312 620 10 4
41   Laurence Baldauff (AUT) 313 306 619 16 3
42   Ika Yuliana Rochmawati (INA) 315 302 617 15 2
43   Laxmirani Majhi (IND) 306 308 614 13 3
44   Leidys Brito (VEN) 309 305 614 9 3
45   Kristine Esebua (GEO) 301 311 612 20 5
46   Claudia Mandia (ITA) 307 305 612 19 6
47   Christine Bjerendal (SWE) 305 306 611 11 3
48   Natalia Sánchez (COL) 314 295 609 16 6
49   Zahra Nemati (IRI) 305 304 609 12 4
50   Sarah Nikitin (BRA) 305 304 609 11 3
51   San Yu Htwe (MYA) 306 302 608 16 8
52   Carolina Aguirre (COL) 299 306 605 13 4
53   Shamoli Ray (BAN) 303 297 600 11 4
54   Marina Canetta (BRA) 303 296 599 14 2
55   Evangelia Psarra (GRE) 313 283 596 12 4
56   Reem Mansour (EGY) 300 296 596 12 3
57   Yuliya Lobzhenidze (GEO) 306 288 594 12 4
58   Alice Ingley (AUS) 304 289 593 9 1
59   Yuki Hayashi (JPN) 298 293 591 7 5
60   Karma (BHU) 300 288 588 9 0
61   Georcy-Stéphanie Picard (CAN) 297 288 585 11 1
62   Shehzana Anwar (KEN) 290 289 579 9 2
63   Lusitania Tatafu (TGA) 276 283 559 10 3
64   Yessica Camilo (DOM) 275 250 525 5 1
Source:[10]:34-35

Competition bracketEdit

Section 1Edit

1/32 eliminations 1/16 eliminations 1/8 eliminations Quarter-finals
                                
1   M-s Choi (KOR) 6 28 27 28
64   Y Camilo (DOM) 0 20 23 25
1   M-s Choi (KOR) 6 29 28 29 27
33   C-y Le (TPE) 2 29 26 28 27
33   C-y Le (TPE) 6 25 28 27 27
32   A Martín (ESP) 2 27 26 25 26
1   M-s Choi (KOR) 7 27 27 28 28 28
16   I Stepanova (RUS) 3 26 29 27 28 27
17   K Perova (RUS) 6 26 25 28 27 24
48   N Sánchez (COL) 4 25 29 19 27 24
17   K Perova (RUS) 3 25 27 24 29 26
16   I Stepanova (RUS) 7 26 26 30 29 27
49   Z Nemati (IRI) 2 21 28 26 26
16   I Stepanova (RUS) 6 28 27 28 27
1   M-s Choi (KOR) 0 23 26 27
8   A Valencia (MEX) 6 25 29 29
9   S-c Lin (TPE) 6 28 26 25
56   R Mansour (EGY) 0 17 21 17
9   S-c Lin (TPE) 2 24 24 27 26
24   BD Laishram (IND) 6 27 27 26 28
41   L Baldauff (AUT) 2 27 23 23 24
24   BD Laishram (IND) 6 24 28 27 25
24   BD Laishram (IND) 2 26 26 27 23
8   A Valencia (MEX) 6 28 23 28 25
25   YE Anagöz (TUR) 6* 26 23 22 30 26
40   K Lipiarska-Pałka (POL) 5 22 23 23 27 27
25   YE Anagöz (TUR) 5 28 26 28 28 26
8   A Valencia (MEX) 6* 28 28 28 27 26
57   Y Lobzhenidze (GEO) 4 28 28 26 27 27
8   A Valencia (MEX) 6 25 27 27 28 29

Section 2Edit

1/32 eliminations 1/16 eliminations 1/8 eliminations Quarter-finals
                                
5   T Dashidorzhieva (RUS) 7 26 28 26 27 28
60   Karma (BHU) 3 26 22 26 27 21
5   T Dashidorzhieva (RUS) 4 28 25 28 25 29
28   H Cao (CHN) 6 28 29 27 27 29
37   O Senyuk (AZE) 1 23 25 23 26
28   H Cao (CHN) 7 28 25 24 27
28   H Cao (CHN) 2 27 26 29 26
21   L Unruh (GER) 6 28 29 28 29
21   L Unruh (GER) 6 28 27 22 27 27
44   L Brito (VEN) 4 25 25 24 28 24
21   L Unruh (GER) 6 29 27 26 25 28
12   G Bayardo (MEX) 4 27 26 27 27 26
53   S Ray (BAN) 0 27 23 25
12   G Bayardo (MEX) 6 28 28 28
21   L Unruh (GER) 6* 25 28 27 28 26
4   Y-t Tan (TPE) 5 27 26 28 26 26
13   G Sartori (ITA) 6 29 27 28
52   C Aguirre (COL) 0 24 23 25
13   G Sartori (ITA) 2 27 26 26 27
20   D Kumari (IND) 6 24 29 28 28
45   K Esebua (GEO) 4 26 29 27 29 29
20   D Kumari (IND) 6 27 29 30 27 29
20   D Kumari (IND) 0 27 26 27
4   Y-t Tan (TPE) 6 28 29 30
29   A Pavlova (UKR) 6 28 29 29
36   L Saidiyeva (KAZ) 0 22 26 24
29   A Pavlova (UKR) 0 26 27 25
4   Y-t Tan (TPE) 6 27 29 29
61   G-S Picard (CAN) 1 27 25 26 24
4   Y-t Tan (TPE) 7 29 26 26 28

Section 3Edit

1/32 eliminations 1/16 eliminations 1/8 eliminations Quarter-finals
                                
3   B-b Ki (KOR) 7 26 26 26 27
62   S Anwar (KEN) 1 24 23 26 26
3   B-b Ki (KOR) 6 29 27 29 29
30   V Marchenko (UKR) 2 27 27 29 25
35   L Nurmsalu (EST) 0 22 23 21
30   V Marchenko (UKR) 6 27 25 26
3   B-b Ki (KOR) 6 27 29 29
51   SY Htwe (MYA) 0 26 17 27
19   M Brown (USA) 6 26 29 28 28 28
46   C Mandia (ITA) 4 27 29 26 28 22
19   M Brown (USA) 3 26 26 26 26 25
51   SY Htwe (MYA) 7 26 28 30 25 27
51   SY Htwe (MYA) 7 26 26 26 27 27
14   T Kuoppa (FIN) 3 25 28 26 25 25
3   B-b Ki (KOR) 6 28 25 27 29
6   J Wu (CHN) 2 27 28 22 26
11   Y Qi (CHN) 7 28 27 28 30
54   M Canetta (BRA) 1 25 27 25 26
11   Y Qi (CHN) 6 29 28 27
22   A Longová (SVK) 0 27 26 24
43   L Majhi (IND) 1 25 26 26 24
22   A Longová (SVK) 7 27 28 26 27
11   Y Qi (CHN) 5 25 27 28 27 28
6   J Wu (CHN) 6* 26 29 28 26 27
27   A Mîrca (MDA) 6 27 25 28 26 27
38   A Román (MEX) 4 25 29 25 26 27
27   A Mîrca (MDA) 0 25 23 24
6   J Wu (CHN) 6 26 25 27
59   Y Hayashi (JPN) 1 22 24 25 27
6   J Wu (CHN) 7 22 28 27 28

Section 4Edit

1/32 eliminations 1/16 eliminations 1/8 eliminations Quarter-finals
                                
7   L Boari (ITA) 1 25 25 22 20
58   A Ingley (AUS) 7 25 28 23 24
58   A Ingley (AUS) 0 23 24 24
26   AM dos Santos (BRA) 6 25 26 26
39   S Nagamine (JPN) 3 28 25 19 25 19
26   AM dos Santos (BRA) 7 27 29 24 25 22
26   AM dos Santos (BRA) 2 25 27 25 20
23   N Folkard (GBR) 6 27 27 25 25
23   N Folkard (GBR) 6* 28 27 29 24 27
42   IY Rochmawati (INA) 5 27 25 29 26 28
23   N Folkard (GBR) 6 26 28 29
10   K Kawanaka (JPN) 0 22 26 26
55   E Psarra (GRE) 3 25 26 27 25 25
10   K Kawanaka (JPN) 7 25 29 26 26 29
23   N Folkard (GBR) 1 25 27 27 27
2   H-j Chang (KOR) 7 26 27 28 28
15   U-j Kang (PRK) 6 25 25 27
50   S Nikitin (BRA) 0 24 23 22
15   U-j Kang (PRK) 6 25 26 25 27
47   C Bjerendal (SWE) 2 26 25 23 25
47   C Bjerendal (SWE) 6 25 25 26 28
18   A Rendón (COL) 2 27 24 24 27
15   U-j Kang (PRK) 2 27 24 27 27
2   H-j Chang (KOR) 6 27 28 29 27
31   L Sichenikova (UKR) 7 25 25 27 28
34   K Narimanidze (GEO) 1 25 24 24 27
31   L Sichenikova (UKR) 2 27 28 28 25
2   H-j Chang (KOR) 6 28 29 26 28
63   L Tatafu (TGA) 0 23 15 23
2   H-j Chang (KOR) 6 28 27 27

FinalsEdit

Semi-finals Gold medal match
                
8   Alejandra Valencia (MEX) 2 26 26 25 26
21   Lisa Unruh (GER) 6 27 28 23 27
21   Lisa Unruh (GER)   2 26 28 26 27
2   Chang Hye-jin (KOR)   6 27 26 27 29
3   Ki Bo-bae (KOR) 3 25 24 24 26 26
2   Chang Hye-jin (KOR) 7 19 27 27 26 28 Bronze medal match
8   Alejandra Valencia (MEX) 4 25 29 25 27 25
3   Ki Bo-bae (KOR)   6 26 28 26 21 30

Source:[10]:30-32

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Places are assigned to the NOCs, which decide on the archers who will represent the nation at the event.[5]

ReferencesEdit

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  28. ^ "La mexicana Alejandra Valencia cayó en el duelo por el bronce en tiro con arco femenil" [Mexican Alejandra Valencia loses in duel for bronze in women's archery] (in Spanish). Televisa Univision Deportes Network. 11 August 2016. Retrieved 23 July 2019.
  29. ^ a b Baek, Byung-yeul (12 August 2016). "Chang Hye-jin captures archery gold". The Korea Times. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  30. ^ Park, Ga-young (29 November 2016). "Olympic archery champion named top S. Korean female athlete of 2016". Korea Herald. Yonhap News Agency. Retrieved 24 July 2019.

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