Amelia is an unincorporated community and former village in Clermont County, Ohio, United States. The population was 4,801 at the 2010 census. Amelia incorporated in 1900. In November 2019, residents voted to dissolve the village over the imposition of a local income tax.[3]

Amelia, Ohio
The Amelia welcome sign, removed in 2019.[2]
The Amelia welcome sign, removed in 2019.[2]
Motto(s): 
Where Vision Becomes Reality
Location of Amelia, Ohio
Location of Amelia, Ohio
Location of Amelia in Clermont County
Location of Amelia in Clermont County
Coordinates: 39°1′45″N 84°13′16″W / 39.02917°N 84.22111°W / 39.02917; -84.22111Coordinates: 39°1′45″N 84°13′16″W / 39.02917°N 84.22111°W / 39.02917; -84.22111
CountryUnited States
StateOhio
CountyClermont
IncorporatedDecember 20, 1900
DissolvedNovember 25, 2019
Government
 • Mayor-electRenee Gerber[3]
Area
 • Total1.79 sq mi (4.64 km2)
 • Land1.79 sq mi (4.64 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation876 ft (267 m)
Population
 • Total4,801
 • Estimate 
(2018[7])
5,009
 • Density2,682.1/sq mi (1,035.6/km2)
Demonym(s)Amelian[8]
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
45102
Area code(s)513
FIPS code39-01742[9]
GNIS feature ID1064319[5]
Websitewww.ameliavillage.com

HistoryEdit

 
Amelia Bowdoin House

Amelia was not officially platted.[10] The area was originally called Milltown, later shortened to Milton. However, when a post office was established in 1836, there was already a Milton Post Office in the state. Various accounts state that the post office was named Amelia after Amelia Bowdoin, a well known and popular tollkeeper on the Ohio Turnpike (present-day State Route 125). Her home is now known as the Amelia Bowdoin House and stands at 94 West Main Street, across the street from its original location.[11][12][13] However, there is no census record of an Amelia Bowdoin; Amelia may have been a corruption of the name of Armilla Bodin, the wife of a tollkeeper.[13][14] Amelia was incorporated as a village on December 20, 1900.[15]

Amelia's population rose from 2,979 in the 2000 census to an estimated 5,149 in 2017. Under state law, the village would have been required to become a city after it posted a population over 5,000 in the 2020 census. In preparation for becoming a city, it adopted a charter in November 2017,[1][16] though the change in status was not reflected in the Ohio Secretary of State's roster of municipalities.[17]

DissolutionEdit

 
Eastbound State Route 125 (Main Street) in Amelia

In 2008, Amelia Village Council proposed a one-percent income tax to cover maintenance of Ohio State Route 125 within the village. In response to the proposal, Amelia Residents for Fiscal Responsibility gathered a petition to dissolve the village into Pierce and Batavia townships. The Clermont County Board of Elections initially rejected the petition after invalidating many of the signatures, but the group succeeded in adding the initiative to a May 5, 2009, special election.[16] Amelia survived the election by a margin of 865 to 401.[18][19]

On February 5, 2018, the council unanimously adopted the proposed one-percent income tax in an emergency ordinance, without the usual three readings, to meet a deadline imposed by the Regional Income Tax Authority.[1][16] The tax went into effect on July 1, 2018, making Amelia the last village in Clermont County to impose an income tax after cuts to the state's local government fund and one of more than 600 cities and villages in Ohio that tax income.[2] Former councilmember Renee Gerber subsequently led a petition drive for dissolution. A June 29 council meeting became heated over the tax and dissolution campaign.[16]

On November 5, 2019, residents voted to dissolve the village by a margin of 843 to 479. Amelia was split between Pierce and Batavia townships along State Route 125. Newtonsville residents voted for dissolution the same day.[20] Dissolution took effect at 10:00 AM on November 25, 2019, when the election results were certified.[15] Gerber was elected to serve as the village's final mayor during a yearlong transition period that is being overseen by the Ohio State Auditor.[3][21] Amelia was by far the most populous village in state history to be dissolved and the first to be partitioned between two townships.[20][21]

GeographyEdit

Amelia is located at 39°1′45″N 84°13′16″W / 39.02917°N 84.22111°W / 39.02917; -84.22111 (39.029123, -84.221111).[22]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village had a total area of 1.79 square miles (4.64 km2), all land.[4]

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1880185
1910417
192065857.8%
1930427−35.1%
194055028.8%
19506019.3%
196091351.9%
1970820−10.2%
19801,10835.1%
19901,83765.8%
20002,75249.8%
20104,80174.5%
Est. 20185,009[7]4.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[23]

2010 censusEdit

As of the census[6] of 2010, there were 4,801 people, 1,830 households, and 1,238 families living in the village. The population density was 2,682.1 inhabitants per square mile (1,035.6/km2). There were 1,974 housing units at an average density of 1,102.8 per square mile (425.8/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 95.1% White, 1.6% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.9% of the population.

There were 1,830 households of which 41.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.3% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.15.

The median age in the village was 30.5 years. 29.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 36.6% were from 25 to 44; 19.7% were from 45 to 64; and 5.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 48.5% male and 51.5% female.

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 2,752 people, 1,063 households, and 738 families living in the village. The population density was 2,007.2 people per square mile (775.6/km²). There were 1,112 housing units at an average density of 811.1 per square mile (313.4/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 96.77% White, 0.58% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.73% from other races, and 1.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.27% of the population.

There were 1,063 households out of which 41.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.0% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 24.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the village, the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 39.3% from 25 to 44, 13.9% from 45 to 64, and 7.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 89.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.9 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $44,900, and the median income for a family was $51,699. Males had a median income of $37,500 versus $26,295 for females. The per capita income for the village was $17,772. About 5.0% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 14.1% of those age 65 or over.

EducationEdit

Amelia has a public library, a branch of the Clermont County Public Library.[24]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Vilvens, Sheila (June 29, 2018). "Residents call for the dissolution of Clermont County Village of Amelia". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Mervosh, Sarah (November 26, 2019). "They Wanted to Save Their 119-Year-Old Village. So They Got Rid of It". The New York Times. Retrieved November 26, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c "Amelia residents vote to dissolve village". WCPO-TV. E. W. Scripps Company. 2019-11-06. Retrieved 2019-11-07.
  4. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  5. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  7. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 16, 2019.
  8. ^ Wartman, Scott (October 28, 2019). "Ever been to Newtonsville, Ohio? Now's your chance. It's one of two local villages that could disappear". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  9. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  10. ^ Everts, Louis H. (1880). History of Clermont County, Ohio, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co. p. 435.
  11. ^ "Clermont County, Ohio: History of Amelia". Archived from the original on 2008-01-27. Retrieved 2008-01-05.
  12. ^ "Clermont County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  13. ^ a b Hunt, Sarah (June 25, 2018). "The Forgotten Women of Clermont County: How did the village of Amelia get its name exactly?". The Clermont Sun. Champion Media. Retrieved November 10, 2019.
  14. ^ Troxell, Pam (2012). "And They Lived in Amelia: Amelia Bodin". Clermont County Ohio Historical Society. Retrieved November 10, 2019.
  15. ^ a b London, John (November 7, 2019). "Amelia voted itself out of existence: Now what?". WLWT-TV. Hearst Television. Retrieved November 8, 2019.
  16. ^ a b c d Milam, Brett (July 17, 2018). "Anger boils over in Amelia". The Clermont Sun. Batavia, Ohio: Champion Media. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  17. ^ "Villages, Statutory" (Microsoft Excel). The Ohio Municipal, Township and School Board Roster. Ohio Secretary of State. 2018. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  18. ^ Brunsman, Barrett J. (2009-01-29). "Abolish Amelia, petitioners demand". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Retrieved 2009-01-29. Residents who want to dissolve this Clermont County village have submitted petitions asking that voters be allowed to decide the matter in May. ... Village Council must adopt a resolution before Feb. 19 to get the issue on the May 5 ballot.
  19. ^ Giroud, Lynn (6 May 2009). "Amelia Voters Decide Against Dissolution". WCPO-TV. Cincinnati, Ohio: E. W. Scripps Company. Archived from the original on 7 May 2009. Retrieved 8 May 2009.
  20. ^ a b Wartman, Scott (2009-11-06). "Two villages voted themselves out of existence on Tuesday". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Retrieved 2019-11-06.
  21. ^ a b Alley, Megan (October 17, 2019). "Pierce Twp. holds special meeting to answer 'what-ifs' surronding possible Amelia dissolve". The Clermont Sun. Batavia, Ohio: Champion Media. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  22. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  23. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  24. ^ "Locations". Clermont County Public Library. Retrieved 25 February 2018.

External linksEdit