2020 Giro d'Italia

The 2020 Giro d'Italia was a road cycling stage race that took place between 3 and 25 October, after initially being postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[1] It was originally to have taken place from 9 to 31 May 2020, as the 103rd edition of the Giro d'Italia, a three-week Grand Tour. The start of the 2020 Giro (known as the Grande Partenza) had been planned to take place in Budapest, Hungary, which would have been the 14th time the Giro has started outside Italy,[2] and the first time a Grand Tour has visited Hungary.[3]

2020 Giro d'Italia
2020 UCI World Tour, race 16 of 21
Race details
Dates3–25 October
Stages21
Distance3,361.4[N 1] km (2,089 mi)
Winning time85h 40' 21"
Results
Winner  Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR) (Ineos Grenadiers)
  Second  Jai Hindley (AUS) (Team Sunweb)
  Third  Wilco Kelderman (NED) (Team Sunweb)

Points  Arnaud Démare (FRA) (Groupama–FDJ)
Mountains  Ruben Guerreiro (POR) (EF Pro Cycling)
Youth  Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR) (Ineos Grenadiers)
  Sprints  Simon Pellaud (SUI) (Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec)
  Combativity  Thomas De Gendt (BEL) (Lotto–Soudal)
  Team Ineos Grenadiers
← 2019
2021 →

The event was jeopardised by the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy,[4] and in March 2020 it was postponed, as other early season races in Italy had been.[5] When the government of Hungary announced they would not allow the Grande Partenza to take place, RCS Sport decided they would postpone the race to a later to-be-determined date.[6] On 15 April, UCI announced that both Giro and Vuelta would take place in autumn after the 2020 UCI Road World Championships.[7] On 5 May, UCI announced that the Giro would take place between 3 and 25 October.[1]

The race was won by Tao Geoghegan Hart of Great Britain, who finished 39 seconds ahead of Australia's Jai Hindley.[8]

TeamsEdit

Twenty-two teams participated in the 2020 Giro d'Italia. All nineteen UCI WorldTeams are entitled, and obliged, to enter the race. Additionally, three second-tier UCI Professional Continental teams were invited to participate in the event. The teams were announced on 16 January 2020.[9] On 13 October 2020, ahead of the start of stage 10, Mitchelton-Scott and Jumbo-Visma withdrew all their remaining riders from the race following positive COVID-19 tests.[10]

The teams participating in the race were:

UCI WorldTeams

UCI Professional Continental teams

Pre-race favouritesEdit

Geraint Thomas (Ineos Grenadiers), the 2018 Tour de France champion, was considered the pre-race favourite. Simon Yates (Mitchelton–Scott) was seen as one of his main challengers after beating Thomas in the lead-up race Tirreno–Adriatico. Steven Kruijswijk (Team Jumbo–Visma), a previous race leader in 2016, was another top contender, as was the only past champion in the field – two-time winner Vincenzo Nibali (Trek–Segafredo). Astana's trio of Jakob Fuglsang, Miguel Ángel López and Aleksandr Vlasov were also seen as top contenders. Other riders considered as contenders included Rafal Majka (Bora–Hansgrohe) and Wilco Kelderman (Team Sunweb). Remco Evenepoel (Deceuninck–Quick-Step) was earlier considered a favourite but did not enter the race due to injuries sustained in Il Lombardia.

Riders believed to be the main contenders for victories on the sprint stages were Arnaud Démare (Groupama–FDJ), Fernando Gaviria (UAE Team Emirates), Peter Sagan (Bora–Hansgrohe), Elia Viviani (Cofidis) and Michael Matthews (Team Sunweb).[11][12]

Route and stagesEdit

List of stages
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 3 October Monreale to Palermo 15 km (9 mi)   Individual time trial   Filippo Ganna (ITA)
2 4 October Alcamo to Agrigento 149 km (93 mi)   Hilly stage   Diego Ulissi (ITA)
3 5 October Enna to Etna 150 km (93 mi)   Mountain stage   Jonathan Caicedo (ECU)
4 6 October Catania to Villafranca Tirrena 140 km (87 mi)   Flat stage   Arnaud Démare (FRA)
5 7 October Mileto to Camigliatello Silano 225 km (140 mi)   Intermediate stage   Filippo Ganna (ITA)
6 8 October Castrovillari to Matera 188 km (117 mi)   Flat stage   Arnaud Démare (FRA)
7 9 October Matera to Brindisi 143 km (89 mi)   Flat stage   Arnaud Démare (FRA)
8 10 October Giovinazzo to Vieste 200 km (124 mi)   Intermediate stage   Alex Dowsett (GBR)
9 11 October San Salvo to Roccaraso (Aremogna) 207 km (129 mi)   Mountain stage   Ruben Guerreiro (POR)
12 October Rest day
10 13 October Lanciano to Tortoreto 177 km (110 mi)   Intermediate stage   Peter Sagan (SVK)
11 14 October Porto Sant'Elpidio to Rimini 182 km (113 mi)   Flat stage   Arnaud Démare (FRA)
12 15 October Cesenatico to Cesenatico 204 km (127 mi)   Intermediate stage   Jhonatan Narváez (ECU)
13 16 October Cervia to Monselice 192 km (119 mi)   Hilly stage   Diego Ulissi (ITA)
14 17 October Conegliano to Valdobbiadene 34.1 km (21 mi)   Individual time trial   Filippo Ganna (ITA)
15 18 October Base Aerea Rivolto to Piancavallo 185 km (115 mi)   Mountain stage   Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR)
19 October Rest day
16 20 October Udine to San Daniele del Friuli 229 km (142 mi)   Intermediate stage   Jan Tratnik (SLO)
17 21 October Bassano del Grappa to Madonna di Campiglio 203 km (126 mi)   Mountain stage   Ben O'Connor (AUS)
18 22 October Pinzolo to Laghi di Cancano 207 km (129 mi)   Mountain stage   Jai Hindley (AUS)
19 23 October Morbegno Abbiategrasso to Asti 124.5 km (77 mi)[N 2]   Flat stage   Josef Černý (CZE)
20 24 October Alba to Sestriere 190 km (118 mi)[N 3]   Mountain stage   Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR)
21 25 October Cernusco sul Naviglio to Milano 15.7 km (10 mi)   Individual time trial   Filippo Ganna (ITA)
Total 3,361.4 km (2,089 mi)[N 1]
  1. ^ a b Distance originally was 3,497.9 km.
  2. ^ Distance originally was 253 km, then it was rerouted to 258 km. Before the start of the stage, the distance was shortened to 124.5 km after riders were protesting against the long distance in bad weather conditions.[13][14]
  3. ^ Distance originally was 198 km. Due to French COVID-19 rules, the Giro was not allowed to enter France.[15]

Classification tableEdit

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
 
Points classification
 
Mountains classification
 
Young rider classification
 
General Super Team
1 Filippo Ganna Filippo Ganna Filippo Ganna Rick Zabel Filippo Ganna Ineos Grenadiers
2 Diego Ulissi Diego Ulissi Peter Sagan
3 Jonathan Caicedo João Almeida Jonathan Caicedo João Almeida Deceuninck–Quick-Step
4 Arnaud Démare Peter Sagan
5 Filippo Ganna Filippo Ganna
6 Arnaud Démare Arnaud Démare
7 Arnaud Démare
8 Alex Dowsett Ineos Grenadiers
9 Ruben Guerreiro Ruben Guerreiro
10 Peter Sagan
11 Arnaud Démare
12 Jhonatan Narváez
13 Diego Ulissi
14 Filippo Ganna
15 Tao Geoghegan Hart Giovanni Visconti
16 Jan Tratnik
17 Ben O'Connor Ruben Guerreiro
18 Jai Hindley Wilco Kelderman Jai Hindley
19 Josef Černý
20 Tao Geoghegan Hart Jai Hindley
21 Filippo Ganna Tao Geoghegan Hart Tao Geoghegan Hart
Final Tao Geoghegan Hart Arnaud Démare Ruben Guerreiro Tao Geoghegan Hart Ineos Grenadiers
  • On stage 2, João Almeida, who was second in the points classification, wore the cyclamen jersey, because first placed Filippo Ganna wore the pink jersey as the leader of the general classification. Because Ganna and Almeida were also the first two riders in the young rider classification, Mikkel Bjerg, who was third in the young rider classification, wore the white jersey.
  • On stage 3, João Almeida, who was second in the young rider classification, wore the white jersey, because first placed Filippo Ganna wore the pink jersey as the leader of the general classification.
  • On stages 4–10, Harm Vanhoucke, who was second in the young rider classification, wore the white jersey, because first placed João Almeida wore the pink jersey as the leader of the general classification. On stages 11–14 and 16–18, Jai Hindley wore the white jersey for the same reason, as did Brandon McNulty on stage 15.
  • On stage 21, Tao Geoghegan Hart, who was second in the young rider classification, wore the white jersey, because first placed Jai Hindley wore the pink jersey as the leader of the general classification.

Classification standingsEdit

Legend
  Denotes the winner of the general classification   Denotes the winner of the mountains classification
  Denotes the winner of the points classification   Denotes the winner of the young rider classification

General classificationEdit

Final general classification (1–10)[16]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR)    Ineos Grenadiers 85h 40' 21"
2   Jai Hindley (AUS) Team Sunweb + 39"
3   Wilco Kelderman (NED) Team Sunweb + 1' 29"
4   João Almeida (POR) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 2' 57"
5   Pello Bilbao (ESP) Bahrain–McLaren + 3' 09"
6   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 7' 02"
7   Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Trek–Segafredo + 8' 15"
8   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 8' 42"
9   Fausto Masnada (ITA) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 9' 57"
10   Hermann Pernsteiner (AUT) Bahrain–McLaren + 11' 05"

Points classificationEdit

Final points classification (1–10)[16]
Rank Rider Team Points
1   Arnaud Démare (FRA)   Groupama–FDJ 233
2   Peter Sagan (SVK) Bora–Hansgrohe 184
3   João Almeida (POR) Deceuninck–Quick-Step 108
4   Filippo Ganna (ITA) Ineos Grenadiers 87
5   Josef Černý (CZE) CCC Team 78
6   Andrea Vendrame (ITA) AG2R La Mondiale 78
7   Diego Ulissi (ITA) UAE Team Emirates 77
8   Simon Pellaud (SUI) Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec 70
9   Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR)    Ineos Grenadiers 66
10   Patrick Konrad (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe 61

Mountains classificationEdit

Final mountains classification (1–10)[16]
Rank Rider Team Points
1   Ruben Guerreiro (POR)   EF Pro Cycling 234
2   Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR)    Ineos Grenadiers 157
3   Thomas De Gendt (BEL) Lotto–Soudal 122
4   Rohan Dennis (AUS) Ineos Grenadiers 119
5   Ben O'Connor (AUS) NTT Pro Cycling 71
6   Jai Hindley (AUS) Team Sunweb 71
7   Wilco Kelderman (NED) Team Sunweb 55
8   Filippo Ganna (ITA) Ineos Grenadiers 48
9   Jonathan Castroviejo (ESP) Ineos Grenadiers 45
10   Einer Rubio (COL) Movistar Team 44

Young rider classificationEdit

Final young rider classification (1–10)[16]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR)    Ineos Grenadiers 85h 40' 21"
2   Jai Hindley (AUS) Team Sunweb + 39"
3   João Almeida (POR) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 2' 57"
4   Sergio Samitier (ESP) Movistar Team + 35' 29"
5   James Knox (GBR) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 37' 41"
6   Brandon McNulty (USA) UAE Team Emirates + 38' 10"
7   Aurélien Paret-Peintre (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 45' 04"
8   Ben O'Connor (AUS) NTT Pro Cycling + 1h 02' 57"
9   Sam Oomen (NED) Team Sunweb + 1h 03' 46"
10   Matteo Fabbro (ITA) Bora–Hansgrohe + 1h 13' 49"

Team classificationEdit

Final team classification (1–10)[16]
Rank Team Time
1 Ineos Grenadiers 257h 15' 58"
2 Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 22' 32"
3 Team Sunweb + 28' 50"
4 Bahrain–McLaren + 32' 50"
5 Bora–Hansgrohe + 1h 12' 34"
6 NTT Pro Cycling + 1h 49' 59"
7 AG2R La Mondiale + 2h 04' 38"
8 Movistar Team + 2h 08' 26"
9 Astana + 2h 29' 44"
10 Trek–Segafredo + 2h 42' 36"

Intermediate sprint classificationEdit

Final intermediate sprint classification (1–10)[16]
Rank Rider Team Points
1   Simon Pellaud (SUI) Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec 78
2   Thomas De Gendt (BEL) Lotto–Soudal 56
3   Marco Frapporti (ITA) Vini Zabù–Brado–KTM 44
4   Mattia Bais (ITA) Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec 34
5   Jhonatan Restrepo (COL) Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec 28
6   Andrea Vendrame (ITA) AG2R La Mondiale 25
7   Peter Sagan (SVK) Bora–Hansgrohe 21
8   Francesco Romano (ITA) Bardiani–CSF–Faizanè 20
9   Héctor Carretero (ESP) Movistar Team 19
10   Matthew Holmes (GBR) Lotto–Soudal 17

Combativity classificationEdit

Final combativity classification (1–10)[16]
Rank Rider Team Points
1   Thomas De Gendt (BEL) Lotto–Soudal 55
2   Simon Pellaud (SUI) Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec 52
3   Tao Geoghegan Hart (GBR)    Ineos Grenadiers 45
4   Ruben Guerreiro (POR)   EF Pro Cycling 45
5   Peter Sagan (SVK) Bora–Hansgrohe 40
6   Rohan Dennis (AUS) Ineos Grenadiers 39
7   Filippo Ganna (ITA) Ineos Grenadiers 37
8   Jai Hindley (AUS) Team Sunweb 36
9   João Almeida (POR) Deceuninck–Quick-Step 35
10   Arnaud Démare (FRA)   Groupama–FDJ 33

Breakaway classificationEdit

Final breakaway classification (1–10)[16]
Rank Rider Team Kilometers
1   Mattia Bais (ITA) Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec 458
2   Marco Frapporti (ITA) Vini Zabù–Brado–KTM 428
3   Simon Pellaud (SUI) Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec 352
4   Matthew Holmes (GBR) Lotto–Soudal 336
5   Salvatore Puccio (ITA) Ineos Grenadiers 320
6   Alessandro Tonelli (ITA) Bardiani–CSF–Faizanè 307
7   Filippo Ganna (ITA) Ineos Grenadiers 304
8   Simone Ravanelli (ITA) Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec 304
9   Francesco Romano (ITA) Bardiani–CSF–Faizanè 263
10   Thomas De Gendt (BEL) Lotto–Soudal 237

Fair play classificationEdit

Final fair play classification (1–10)[16]
Rank Team Points
1 Groupama–FDJ 0
2 Androni Giocattoli–Sidermec 0.5
3 Team Sunweb 20
4 AG2R La Mondiale 20
5 CCC Team 20
6 Bora–Hansgrohe 40
7 Deceuninck–Quick-Step 60
8 Vini Zabù–Brado–KTM 70
9 UAE Team Emirates 85
10 NTT Pro Cycling 100

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Farrand, Stephen (5 May 2020). "UCI reveal new men's and women's post-COVID-19 race calendar". Cycling News. Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  2. ^ "Giro d'Italia to start in Budapest in 2020". Cycling News. 15 April 2019. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  3. ^ "Giro d'Italia to start in Budapest in 2020". Cycling Weekly. 15 April 2019. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  4. ^ "Milan-San Remo, Tirreno-Adriatico and Giro d'Italia all under threat after Italian coronavirus outbreak". Cycling Weekly. 24 February 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  5. ^ "Milan San Remo and Tirreno-Adriatico have been postponed". Cycling Weekly.
  6. ^ "Officieel: Giro wordt uitgesteld na maatregelen van Hongaarse regering". Sporza. 13 March 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  7. ^ "Tour de France saved by 29 August shift as Grand Tours jostle for space". The Guardian. 15 April 2020. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  8. ^ "Giro d'Italia: Tao Geoghegan Hart wins first Grand Tour". BBC Sport. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  9. ^ "2020 UCI WorldTour races Wild Cards: RCS Sport choices". RCS Sport. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  10. ^ "Giro d'Italia: Mitchelton-Scott & Jumbo-Visma withdraw after positive Covid results". BBC Sport. Retrieved 13 October 2020.
  11. ^ de Neef, Matt (1 October 2020). "Preview: Your guide to the 2020 Giro d'Italia contenders, sprinters and more". Cyclingtips. Retrieved 2 October 2020.
  12. ^ Farrand, Stephen (29 September 2020). "Giro d'Italia 2020 – Preview". Cyclingnews. Retrieved 2 October 2020.
  13. ^ Bennett, Tom (23 October 2020). "Giro D'Italia 2020 - Riders to take bus for first 100km of Giro stage after peloton threatens strike". www.eurosport.com. Eurosport. Retrieved 23 October 2020.
  14. ^ Ostanek, Daniel (23 October 2020). "Giro d'Italia stage 19 shortened to 124.5km after rider protest". www.cyclingnews.com. Cyclingnews. Retrieved 23 October 2020.
  15. ^ "Giro d'Italia: French COVID-19 rules mean Agnello and Izoard cut from stage 20". www.cyclingnews.com. CyclingNews. 21 October 2020. Retrieved 22 October 2020.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Official classifications of Giro d'Italia 2020". Giro d'Italia. RCS Sport. Retrieved 25 October 2020.

External linksEdit