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2017 UEFA European Under-17 Championship

The 2017 UEFA European Under-17 Championship (also known as UEFA Under-17 Euro 2017) was the 16th edition of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship (35th edition if the Under-16 era is also included), the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the men's under-17 national teams of Europe. Croatia, which were selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015, hosted the tournament.[2]

2017 UEFA European Under-17 Championship
UEFA U-17 Europsko prvenstvo 2017.
2017 UEFA European Under-17 Championship.png
Tournament details
Host countryCroatia
Dates3–19 May 2017
Teams16 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)7 (in 6 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Spain (9th title)
Runners-up England
Tournament statistics
Matches played32
Goals scored99 (3.09 per match)
Attendance43,063 (1,346 per match)
Top scorer(s)France Amine Gouiri (8 goals)
Best player(s)England Jadon Sancho[1]
2016
2018

A total of 16 teams played in the tournament, with players born on or after 1 January 2000 eligible to participate. Each match had a duration of 80 minutes, consisting of two halves of 40 minutes with a 15-minute half-time.

Same as previous editions held in odd-numbered years, the tournament acted as the UEFA qualifiers for the FIFA U-17 World Cup. The top five teams of the tournament qualified for the 2017 FIFA U-17 World Cup in India as the UEFA representatives. This was decreased from the previous six teams, as FIFA decided to give one of the slots originally reserved for UEFA to the Oceania Football Confederation starting from 2017.[3]

Spain won their third title by beating England 4–1 on penalties in the final after a 2–2 draw, and both teams were joined by Germany, Turkey, France as UEFA qualifiers for the 2017 FIFA U-17 World Cup. Portugal were the defending champions, but failed to qualify.

Contents

QualificationEdit

All 54 UEFA nations entered the competition, and with the hosts Croatia qualifying automatically, the other 53 teams competed in the qualifying competition to determine the remaining 15 spots in the final tournament.[4] The qualifying competition consisted of two rounds: Qualifying round, which took place in autumn 2016, and Elite round, which took place in spring 2017.[5]

Qualified teamsEdit

The following 16 teams qualified for the final tournament.[6][7]

Note: All appearance statistics include only U-17 era (since 2002).

Team Method of qualification Finals appearance Last appearance Previous best performance
  Croatia Hosts 4th 2015 Fourth place (2005)
  Germany Elite round Group 1 winners 10th 2016 Champions (2009)
  Turkey Elite round Group 1 runners-up[^] 7th 2014 Champions (2005)
  Hungary Elite round Group 2 winners 4th 2006 Group stage (2002, 2003, 2006)
  Norway Elite round Group 2 runners-up[^] 1st Debut
  Spain Elite round Group 3 winners 11th 2016 Champions (2007, 2008)
  Scotland Elite round Group 4 winners 5th 2016 Semi-finals (2014)
  Serbia Elite round Group 4 runners-up[^] 6th 2016 Quarter-finals (2002)
  Netherlands Elite round Group 5 winners 11th 2016 Champions (2011, 2012)
  Italy Elite round Group 5 runners-up[^] 7th 2016 Runners-up (2013)
  France Elite round Group 6 winners 11th 2016 Champions (2004, 2015)
  Ukraine Elite round Group 6 runners-up[^] 6th 2016 Group stage (2002, 2004, 2007, 2013, 2016)
  England Elite round Group 7 winners 12th 2016 Champions (2010, 2014)
  Bosnia and Herzegovina Elite round Group 7 runners-up[^] 2nd 2016 Group stage (2016)
  Republic of Ireland Elite round Group 8 winners 3rd 2015 Group stage (2008, 2015)
  Faroe Islands Elite round Group 8 runners-up[^] 1st Debut
Notes
  1. ^ The best seven runners-up among all eight elite round groups qualified for the final tournament.

Final drawEdit

The final draw was held on 3 April 2017, 18:00 CEST (UTC+2), at the Panorama Zagreb Hotel in Zagreb, Croatia.[8][9] The 16 teams were drawn into four groups of four teams. Hosts Croatia were assigned to position A1 in the draw, while the other teams were seeded according to their results in the qualification elite round, with the seven best elite round group winners (counting all elite round results) placed in Pot 1 and drawn to positions 1 and 2 in the groups, and the remaining eight teams (the eighth-best elite round group winner and the seven elite round group runners-up) placed in Pot 2 and drawn to positions 3 and 4 in the groups.[10]

Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Seeding
  Croatia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Hosts
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) goals scored; 4) disciplinary points; 5) coefficient; 6) drawing of lots.

VenuesEdit

At first, it was announced that eight stadiums would host the competition, each of those being in Istria and Primorje. Later, that was changed.

Rijeka and Kostrena were the only hosts that were planned at first with new hosts being Varaždin, Zaprešić, Velika Gorica and two in Croatian capital Zagreb – in boroughs Sesvete and Lučko. The final would be played in Varaždin.

Varaždin Velika Gorica Rijeka
Stadion Anđelko Herjavec Stadion Radnik Stadion Rujevica
Capacity: 10,800 Capacity: 8,000 Capacity: 6,134
   
Zaprešić Kostrena Zagreb
Stadion ŠRC Zaprešić Stadion Žuknica Stadion Lučko (Lučko) Stadion sv. Josipa Radnika (Sesvete)
Capacity: 5,228 Capacity: 3,000 Capacity: 1,500 Capacity: 1,200
 

Match officialsEdit

A total of 9 referees, 12 assistant referees and 3 fourth officials were appointed for the final tournament.[11]

SquadsEdit

Each national team submitted a squad of 18 players.[5]

Group stageEdit

The final tournament schedule was confirmed on 7 April 2017.[12]

The group winners and runners-up advance to the quarter-finals.

Tiebreakers

The teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss). If two or more teams are equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following tie-breaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Articles 17.01 and 17.02):[5]

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  2. Superior goal difference resulting from the group matches played among the teams in question;
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  4. If, after having applied criteria 1 to 3, teams still have an equal ranking, criteria 1 to 3 are reapplied exclusively to the group matches between the teams in question to determine their final rankings. If this procedure does not lead to a decision, criteria 5 to 9 apply;
  5. Superior goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Higher number of goals scored in all group matches;
  7. If only two teams have the same number of points, and they are tied according to criteria 1 to 6 after having met in the last round of the group stage, their rankings are determined by a penalty shoot-out (not used if more than two teams have the same number of points, or if their rankings are not relevant for qualification for the next stage).
  8. Lower disciplinary points total based only on yellow and red cards received in the group matches (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  9. Higher position in the coefficient ranking list used for the qualifying round draw;
  10. Drawing of lots.

All times are local, CEST (UTC+2).[13]

Group AEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Spain 3 2 1 0 7 4 +3 7 Knockout stage
2   Turkey 3 2 0 1 8 5 +3 6
3   Italy 3 1 0 2 3 5 −2 3
4   Croatia (H) 3 0 1 2 2 6 −4 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Host.
Turkey  2–3  Spain
Güneş   5'
Karaahmet   11'
Report S. Gómez   24'
Ruiz   33' (pen.)
Morey   72'
Attendance: 300[11]
Referee: Dominik Ouschan (Austria)
Croatia  0–1  Italy
Report Kean   78'
Attendance: 4,092[11]
Referee: Fábio Veríssimo (Portugal)

Croatia  1–4  Turkey
Marin   67' Report Karaahmet   18'
Gül   49'
Kabak   69'
Akgün   80'
Attendance: 1,004[11]
Referee: Nicolas Laforge (Belgium)
Spain  3–1  Italy
S. Gómez   36'
Ruiz   68' (pen.)80'
Report Caviglia   80+2'
Attendance: 744[11]
Referee: Anastasios Papapetrou (Greece)

Spain  1–1  Croatia
Blanco   80+1' Report Čolina   56'
Italy  1–2  Turkey
Pellegri   15' Report Karaahmet   5'
Babacan   74'
Attendance: 700[11]
Referee: Jens Maae (Denmark)

Group BEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Hungary 3 2 1 0 8 3 +5 7 Knockout stage
2   France 3 2 0 1 11 4 +7 6
3   Scotland 3 1 1 1 4 3 +1 4
4   Faroe Islands 3 0 0 3 0 13 −13 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Scotland  2–0  Faroe Islands
Cameron   59'
Aitchison   68'
Report
Attendance: 511[11]
Referee: Donatas Rumšas (Lithuania)
Hungary  3–2  France
Csoboth   38'41'
Bencze   52'
Report Gouiri   36'80+4' (pen.)
Attendance: 892[11]
Referee: Dimitrios Massias (Cyprus)

France  7–0  Faroe Islands
Gouiri   1'10'33'
Caqueret   4'46'
Picouleau   15'
Adli   54'
Report
Attendance: 712[11]
Referee: Jens Maae (Denmark)
Scotland  1–1  Hungary
Rudden   30' Report Szerető   52'

France  2–1  Scotland
Gouiri   35'80' Report Rudden   42'
Attendance: 511[11]
Referee: Nicolas Laforge (Belgium)
Faroe Islands  0–4  Hungary
Report Torvund   24'
Szoboszlai   26'48'
Edmundsson   29' (o.g.)
Attendance: 409[11]
Referee: Fran Jović (Croatia)

Group CEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Germany 3 3 0 0 15 1 +14 9 Knockout stage
2   Republic of Ireland 3 1 0 2 2 9 −7 3
3   Bosnia and Herzegovina 3 1 0 2 2 7 −5 3
4   Serbia 3 1 0 2 2 4 −2 3
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Germany  5–0  Bosnia and Herzegovina
Mai   2'
Keitel   16'
Arp   50'51'62'
Report
Attendance: 1,192[11]
Referee: Nicolas Laforge (Belgium)
Serbia  1–0  Republic of Ireland
Gavrić   72' Report
Attendance: 482[11]
Referee: Anastasios Papapetrou (Greece)

Germany  3–1  Serbia
Abouchabaka   7' (pen.)
Yeboah   39'
Majetschak   61'
Report Stuparević   75' (pen.)
Attendance: 587[11]
Referee: Dominik Ouschan (Austria)
Republic of Ireland  2–1  Bosnia and Herzegovina
Roache   7'
Idah   29' (pen.)
Report Vještica   13'
Attendance: 500[11]
Referee: Fábio Veríssimo (Portugal)

Republic of Ireland  0–7  Germany
Report Abouchabaka   8'
Arp   15'45'49'
O'Connor   21' (o.g.)
Awuku   73'
Hottmann   76'
Attendance: 434[11]
Referee: Fábio Veríssimo (Portugal)
Bosnia and Herzegovina  1–0  Serbia
Imamović   80' Report
Attendance: 504[11]
Referee: Donatas Rumšas (Lithuania)

Group DEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   England 3 3 0 0 10 1 +9 9 Knockout stage
2   Netherlands 3 1 1 1 3 5 −2 4
3   Ukraine 3 1 0 2 2 5 −3 3
4   Norway 3 0 1 2 3 7 −4 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Netherlands  1–0  Ukraine
El Bouchataoui   61' Report
Attendance: 881[11]
Referee: Jens Maae (Denmark)
Norway  1–3  England
Guehi   8' (o.g.) Report Brewster   10'35'
Foden   78'

England  4–0  Ukraine
McEachran   20'
Brewster   32'
Sancho   36'
Barlow   69'
Report
Attendance: 663[11]
Referee: Donatas Rumšas (Lithuania)
Netherlands  2–2  Norway
Aboukhlal   11'
El Bouchataoui   80+2' (pen.)
Report Larsen   50'
Stenevik   55'
Attendance: 699[11]
Referee: Dimitrios Massias (Cyprus)

England  3–0  Netherlands
Sancho   23'48' (pen.)
Hudson-Odoi   80'
Report
Attendance: 1,054[11]
Referee: Anastasios Papapetrou (Greece)
Ukraine  2–0  Norway
Kashchuk   78'
Kholod   80+1'
Report
Attendance: 719[11]
Referee: Dominik Ouschan (Austria)

Knockout stageEdit

In the knockout stage, penalty shoot-out is used to decide the winner if necessary (no extra time is played).[5]

As part of a trial sanctioned by the IFAB to reduce the advantage of the team shooting first in a penalty shoot-out,[14] a different sequence of taking penalties, known as "ABBA", that mirrors the serving sequence in a tennis tiebreak would be used if a penalty shoot-out was needed (team A kicks first, team B kicks second):[15]

Original sequence
AB AB AB AB AB (sudden death starts) AB AB etc.
Trial sequence
AB BA AB BA AB (sudden death starts) BA AB etc.

BracketEdit

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
12 May – Varaždin
 
 
  Spain3
 
16 May – Varaždin
 
  France1
 
  Spain (p)0 (4)
 
13 May – Zaprešić
 
  Germany0 (2)
 
  Germany2
 
19 May – Varaždin
 
  Netherlands1
 
  Spain (p)2 (4)
 
12 May – Velika Gorica
 
  England2 (1)
 
  Hungary0
 
16 May – Zaprešić
 
  Turkey1
 
  Turkey1
 
13 May – Velika Gorica
 
  England2 World Cup play-off
 
  England1
 
16 May – Zagreb
 
  Republic of Ireland0
 
  Hungary0
 
 
  France1
 

Quarter-finalsEdit

Winners qualified for 2017 FIFA U-17 World Cup. The two best losing quarter-finalists entered the FIFA U-17 World Cup play-off.

Hungary  0–1  Turkey
Report Csonka   20' (o.g.)
Attendance: 897[11]
Referee: Donatas Rumšas (Lithuania)

Spain  3–1  France
Morey   17'
Ruiz   35' (pen.)
S. Gómez   56'
Report Gouiri   9'
Attendance: 5,163[11]
Referee: Fran Jović (Croatia)

England  1–0  Republic of Ireland
Sancho   13' Report
Attendance: 879[11]
Referee: Nicolas Laforge (Belgium)

Germany  2–1  Netherlands
Abouchabaka   66'
Arp   79'
Report Aboukhlal   40+1'

Ranking of losing quarter-finalistsEdit

To determine the two best losing quarter-finalists which enter the FIFA U-17 World Cup play-off, the losing quarter-finalists are ranked by the following criteria (Regulations Article 16.06):[5]

  1. Higher position in the group stage (i.e., group winners ahead of group runners-up);
  2. Better results in the group stage (i.e., points, goal difference, goals scored);
  3. Better results in the quarter-finals (i.e., points, goal difference, goals scored);
  4. Lower disciplinary points in the group stage and quarter-finals combined;
  5. Higher position in the coefficient ranking list used for the qualifying round draw;
  6. Drawing of lots.
Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 B1   Hungary 3 2 1 0 8 3 +5 7 FIFA U-17 World Cup play-off
2 B2   France 3 2 0 1 11 4 +7 6
3 D2   Netherlands 3 1 1 1 3 5 −2 4
4 C2   Republic of Ireland 3 1 0 2 2 9 −7 3
Source: UEFA

FIFA U-17 World Cup play-offEdit

Winner qualified for 2017 FIFA U-17 World Cup.

Hungary  0–1  France
Report Gouiri   26'
Attendance: 950[11]
Referee: Anastasios Papapetrou (Greece)

Semi-finalsEdit

Turkey  1–2  England
Kesgin   40+13' Report Hudson-Odoi   11'
Sancho   37'
Attendance: 1,292[11]
Referee: Fábio Veríssimo (Portugal)

Spain  0–0  Germany
Report
Penalties
Ruiz  
Morey  
Segovia  
Chust  
Guillamón  
4–2   Majetschak
  Arp
  Mai
  Keitel
Attendance: 4,581[11]
Referee: Dominik Ouschan (Austria)

FinalEdit

Spain  2–2  England
Morey   38'
Díaz   80+6'
Report Hudson-Odoi   18'
Foden   58'
Penalties
Ruiz  
Morey  
S. Gómez  
Chust  
4–1   Barlow
  Brewster
  Latibeaudiere
Attendance: 8,187[11]
Referee: Jens Maae (Denmark)

GoalscorersEdit

Team of the TournamentEdit

Qualified teams for FIFA U-17 World CupEdit

The following five teams from UEFA qualified for the 2017 FIFA U-17 World Cup.[19][20][21]

Team Qualified on Previous appearances in tournament1
  Spain 12 May 2017 8 (1991, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2007, 2009)
  England 13 May 2017 3 (2007, 2011, 2015)
  Turkey 12 May 2017 2 (2005, 2009)
  Germany 13 May 2017 9 (1985, 1991, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2015)
  France 16 May 2017 5 (1987, 2001, 2007, 2011, 2015)
1 Bold indicates champion for that year. Italic indicates host for that year.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ UEFA considers Amine Gouiri to have scored eight goals in the final tournament, as his goal in the FIFA U-17 World Cup play-off is not considered part of the final tournament tally.[16]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Harrison, Wayne (26 May 2017). "2017: Jadon Sancho". UEFA.com.
  2. ^ "U17 finals destined for Croatia and England". UEFA. Retrieved 26 January 2015.
  3. ^ "FIFA executive vows to improve governance and boost female participation in football". FIFA.com. 25 September 2015.
  4. ^ "Seedings for 2016/17 U17 qualifying round". UEFA.com. 30 October 2015.
  5. ^ a b c d e "Regulations of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship, 2016/17" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  6. ^ "Sixteen-team Under-17 finals line-up set". UEFA.com. 29 March 2017.
  7. ^ "2017 UEFA European Under-17 Championship programme" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  8. ^ "Under-17 final tournament draw". UEFA.com. Retrieved 3 April 2017.
  9. ^ "U17 EURO final tournament draw made". UEFA.com. 3 April 2017.
  10. ^ "Under-17 finals draw on Monday: pots". UEFA.com. 30 March 2017.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag "Technical Report — Results". UEFA.com.
  12. ^ "U17 EURO final tournament match, TV schedule". UEFA.com. 7 April 2017.
  13. ^ "Confirmed Match Schedule" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  14. ^ "Penalty shoot-outs could soon resemble tennis tie-breaks". The Telegraph. 3 March 2017.
  15. ^ "Penalty shoot-out trial at UEFA final tournaments". UEFA.com. 1 May 2017.
  16. ^ "Gouiri takes U17 EURO top scorers' prize". UEFA.com. 19 May 2017.
  17. ^ "Statistics — Tournament phase — Player statistics — Goals". UEFA.com. Retrieved 19 May 2017.
  18. ^ "Technical Report — Team of the Tournament". UEFA.com.
  19. ^ "Spain and Turkey secure India berths". FIFA.com. 12 May 2017.
  20. ^ "England and Germany book tickets to India". FIFA.com. 13 May 2017.
  21. ^ "France complete Europe's India-bound quintet". FIFA.com. 16 May 2017.

External linksEdit