2017 Critérium du Dauphiné

The 2017 Critérium du Dauphiné was a road cycling stage race that took place between 4 and 11 June 2017. It was the 69th edition of the Critérium du Dauphiné and was the twenty-third event of the 2017 UCI World Tour.[2][3]

2017 Critérium du Dauphiné
2017 UCI World Tour, race 23 of 37
Race details
Dates4–11 June 2017
Stages8
Distance1,155 km (717.7 mi)
Winning time29h 05' 54"[1]
Results
Winner  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) (Astana)
  Second  Richie Porte (AUS) (BMC Racing Team)
  Third  Dan Martin (IRL) (Quick-Step Floors)

Points  Arnaud Démare (FRA) (FDJ)
Mountains  Koen Bouwman (NED) (LottoNL–Jumbo)
Youth  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) (Bora–Hansgrohe)
  Team AG2R La Mondiale
← 2016
2018 →

The race was won on the final day by Danish rider Jakob Fuglsang, riding for the Astana team.[1] Having trailed overnight leader Richie Porte (BMC Racing Team) by 75 seconds going into the stage, Fuglsang made his bid for victory by attacking along with AG2R La Mondiale's Romain Bardet and Quick-Step Floors rider Dan Martin on the Col de la Colombière, around 35 kilometres (22 miles) from the finish. They were later caught before the final climb; Fuglsang and Martin went clear again on that climb, with Fuglsang later dropping Martin. Fuglsang remained clear to the finish, winning his second stage of the race by 12 seconds from Martin. Porte ultimately finished the stage in seventh place, 75 seconds behind Fuglsang; however, with bonus seconds in play on the race, Fuglsang's ten-second bonus gave him the race victory by ten seconds over Porte, a first for Denmark at the race.[4] Martin finished third overall, as his six-second bonus allowed him to overtake Chris Froome (Team Sky) by a single second.

In the race's other classifications, FDJ rider Arnaud Démare won the points classification while LottoNL–Jumbo rider Koen Bouwman won the mountains classification having won the second and third stages respectively. Bora–Hansgrohe's Emanuel Buchmann won the young rider classification, while AG2R La Mondiale won the teams classification.

TeamsEdit

As the Critérium du Dauphiné is a UCI World Tour event, all eighteen UCI WorldTeams were invited automatically and obliged to enter a team in the race. Four UCI Professional Continental teams competed, completing the 22-team peloton.[5]

UCI WorldTeams

UCI Professional Continental teams

RouteEdit

The route of the 2017 Critérium du Dauphiné was announced on 16 March 2017.[6]

Stage characteristics and winners[7]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 4 June Saint-Étienne to Saint-Étienne 170.5 km (105.9 mi)   Hilly stage   Thomas De Gendt (BEL)
2 5 June Saint-Chamond to Arlanc 171 km (106.3 mi)   Hilly stage   Arnaud Démare (FRA)
3 6 June Le Chambon-sur-Lignon to Tullins 184 km (114.3 mi)   Flat stage   Koen Bouwman (NED)
4 7 June La Tour-du-Pin to Bourgoin-Jallieu 23.5 km (14.6 mi)   Individual time trial   Richie Porte (AUS)
5 8 June La Tour-de-Salvagny to Mâcon 175.5 km (109.1 mi)   Flat stage   Phil Bauhaus (GER)
6 9 June Parc des Oiseaux to La Motte-Servolex 147.5 km (91.7 mi)   Medium-mountain stage   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN)
7 10 June Aoste to Alpe d'Huez 168 km (104.4 mi)   Mountain stage   Peter Kennaugh (GBR)
8 11 June Albertville to Plateau de Solaison 115 km (71.5 mi)   Mountain stage   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN)

StagesEdit

Stage 1Edit

4 June 2017 — Saint-Étienne to Saint-Étienne, 170.5 km (105.9 mi)[8]
Stage 1 result[9]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Thomas De Gendt (BEL) Lotto–Soudal 4h 17' 04"
2   Axel Domont (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 44"
3   Diego Ulissi (ITA) UAE Team Emirates + 57"
4   Pierre Latour (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 57"
5   Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 57"
6   Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida + 59"
7   Julien Simon (FRA) Cofidis + 59"
8   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 59"
9   Ben Swift (GBR) UAE Team Emirates + 59"
10   Michael Valgren (DEN) Astana + 59"
General classification after Stage 1[10]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Thomas De Gendt (BEL)       Lotto–Soudal 4h 16' 54"
2   Axel Domont (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 48"
3   Diego Ulissi (ITA) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 03"
4   Pierre Latour (FRA)   AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 07"
5   Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 1' 07"
6   Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida + 1' 09"
7   Julien Simon (FRA) Cofidis + 1' 09"
8   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 09"
9   Ben Swift (GBR) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 09"
10   Michael Valgren (DEN) Astana + 1' 09"

Stage 2Edit

5 June 2017 — Saint-Chamond to Arlanc, 171 km (106 mi)[11]
Stage 2 result[12]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Arnaud Démare (FRA) FDJ 4h 13' 53"
2   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 0"
3   Nacer Bouhanni (FRA) Cofidis + 0"
4   Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida + 0"
5   Phil Bauhaus (GER) Team Sunweb + 0"
6   Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR) Team Dimension Data + 0"
7   Ben Swift (GBR) UAE Team Emirates + 0"
8   Pascal Ackermann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 0"
9   Alberto Bettiol (ITA) Cannondale–Drapac + 0"
10   Bryan Coquard (FRA) Direct Énergie + 0"
General classification after Stage 2[13]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Thomas De Gendt (BEL)     Lotto–Soudal 8h 30' 47"
2   Axel Domont (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 48"
3   Diego Ulissi (ITA) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 03"
4   Pierre Latour (FRA)   AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 07"
5   Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 1' 07"
6   Sonny Colbrelli (ITA)   Bahrain–Merida + 1' 09"
7   Ben Swift (GBR) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 09"
8   Alberto Bettiol (ITA) Cannondale–Drapac + 1' 09"
9   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 1' 09"
10   Julien Simon (FRA) Cofidis + 1' 09"

Stage 3Edit

6 June 2017 — Le Chambon-sur-Lignon to Tullins, 184 km (114.3 mi)[14]
Stage 3 result[15]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Koen Bouwman (NED) LottoNL–Jumbo 4h 06' 06"
2   Evaldas Šiškevičius (LTU) Delko–Marseille Provence KTM + 0"
3   Frederik Backaert (BEL) Wanty–Groupe Gobert + 0"
4   Bryan Nauleau (FRA) Direct Énergie + 0"
5   Alexey Vermeulen (USA) LottoNL–Jumbo + 0"
6   Quentin Pacher (FRA) Delko–Marseille Provence KTM + 0"
7   Arnaud Démare (FRA) FDJ + 11"
8   Bryan Coquard (FRA) Direct Énergie + 11"
9   Pascal Ackermann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 11"
10   Phil Bauhaus (GER) Team Sunweb + 11"
General classification after Stage 3[16]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Thomas De Gendt (BEL)     Lotto–Soudal 12h 37' 04"
2   Axel Domont (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 48"
3   Diego Ulissi (ITA) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 03"
4   Pierre Latour (FRA)   AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 07"
5   Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 1' 07"
6   Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida + 1' 09"
7   Ben Swift (GBR) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 09"
8   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 09"
9   Tony Gallopin (FRA) Lotto–Soudal + 1' 09"
10   Guillaume Martin (FRA) Wanty–Groupe Gobert + 1' 09"

Stage 4Edit

7 June 2017 — La Tour-du-Pin to Bourgoin-Jallieu, 23.5 km (14.6 mi), individual time trial (ITT)[17]
Stage 4 result[18]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Richie Porte (AUS) BMC Racing Team 28' 07"
2   Tony Martin (GER) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 12"
3   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 24"
4   Stef Clement (NED) LottoNL–Jumbo + 28"
5   Chad Haga (USA) Team Sunweb + 32"
6   Jasha Sütterlin (GER) Movistar Team + 32"
7   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 35"
8   Chris Froome (GBR) Team Sky + 37"
9   Thomas De Gendt (BEL)   Lotto–Soudal + 42"
10   Brent Bookwalter (USA) BMC Racing Team + 45"
General classification after Stage 4[19]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Thomas De Gendt (BEL)     Lotto–Soudal 13h 05' 53"
2   Richie Porte (AUS) BMC Racing Team + 27"
3   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 51"
4   Stef Clement (NED) LottoNL–Jumbo + 55"
5   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 1' 02"
6   Chris Froome (GBR) Team Sky + 1' 04"
7   Brent Bookwalter (USA) BMC Racing Team + 1' 12"
8   Jesús Herrada (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 15"
9   Sam Oomen (NED)   Team Sunweb + 1' 17"
10   Diego Ulissi (ITA) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 22"

Stage 5Edit

8 June 2017 — La Tour-de-Salvagny to Mâcon, 175.5 km (109.1 mi)[20]
Stage 5 result[21]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Phil Bauhaus (GER) Team Sunweb 4h 04' 32"
2   Arnaud Démare (FRA)   FDJ + 0"
3   Bryan Coquard (FRA) Direct Énergie + 0"
4   Adrien Petit (FRA) Direct Énergie + 0"
5   Nacer Bouhanni (FRA) Cofidis + 0"
6   Alexander Kristoff (NOR) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 0"
7   Pascal Ackermann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 0"
8   Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR) Team Dimension Data + 0"
9   Enrico Battaglin (ITA) LottoNL–Jumbo + 0"
10   Oliver Naesen (BEL) AG2R La Mondiale + 0"
General classification after Stage 5[22]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Thomas De Gendt (BEL)   Lotto–Soudal 17h 10' 25"
2   Richie Porte (AUS) BMC Racing Team + 27"
3   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 51"
4   Stef Clement (NED) LottoNL–Jumbo + 55"
5   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 1' 02"
6   Chris Froome (GBR) Team Sky + 1' 04"
7   Brent Bookwalter (USA) BMC Racing Team + 1' 12"
8   Jesús Herrada (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 15"
9   Sam Oomen (NED)   Team Sunweb + 1' 17"
10   Diego Ulissi (ITA) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 22"

Stage 6Edit

9 June 2017 — Parc des Oiseaux to La Motte-Servolex, 147.5 km (91.7 mi)[23]
Stage 6 result[24]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana 3h 41' 48"
2   Richie Porte (AUS) BMC Racing Team + 0"
3   Chris Froome (GBR) Team Sky + 0"
4   Fabio Aru (ITA) Astana + 0"
5   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 50"
6   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 50"
7   Romain Bardet (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 50"
8   Oliver Naesen (BEL) AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 06"
9   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 1' 06"
10   Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 1' 14"
General classification after Stage 6[25]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Richie Porte (AUS)   BMC Racing Team 20h 52' 34"
2   Chris Froome (GBR) Team Sky + 39"
3   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 15"
4   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 20"
5   Fabio Aru (ITA) Astana + 1' 24"
6   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 1' 47"
7   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 2' 14"
8   Emanuel Buchmann (GER)   Bora–Hansgrohe + 2' 30"
9   Romain Bardet (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 2' 49"
10   Rafael Valls (ESP) Lotto–Soudal + 3' 16"

Stage 7Edit

10 June 2017 — Aoste to Alpe d'Huez, 168 km (104.4 mi)[26]
Stage 7 result[27]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Peter Kennaugh (GBR) Team Sky 4h 43' 59"
2   Ben Swift (GBR) UAE Team Emirates + 13"
3   Jesús Herrada (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 11"
4   Jelle Vanendert (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 1' 13"
5   Romain Bardet (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 14"
6   Richie Porte (AUS)   BMC Racing Team + 1' 56"
7   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 56"
8   Andrew Talansky (USA) Cannondale–Drapac + 2' 04"
9   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 2' 04"
10   Fabio Aru (ITA) Astana + 2' 13"
General classification after Stage 7[27]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Richie Porte (AUS)   BMC Racing Team 25h 38' 29"
2   Chris Froome (GBR) Team Sky + 1' 02"
3   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 15"
4   Fabio Aru (ITA) Astana + 1' 41"
5   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 1' 43"
6   Romain Bardet (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 2' 07"
7   Alberto Contador (ESP) Trek–Segafredo + 2' 15"
8   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 2' 31"
9   Emanuel Buchmann (GER)   Bora–Hansgrohe + 2' 53"
10   Andrew Talansky (USA) Cannondale–Drapac + 3' 43"

Stage 8Edit

11 June 2017 — Albertville to Plateau de Solaison, 115 km (71.5 mi)[28]
Stage 8 result[29]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana 3h 26' 20"
2   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 12"
3   Louis Meintjes (RSA) UAE Team Emirates + 27"
4   Emanuel Buchmann (GER)   Bora–Hansgrohe + 44"
5   Fabio Aru (ITA) Astana + 1' 01"
6   Romain Bardet (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 02"
7   Richie Porte (AUS)   BMC Racing Team + 1' 15"
8   Chris Froome (GBR) Team Sky + 1' 36"
9   Rafael Valls (ESP) Lotto–Soudal + 1' 41"
10   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 3' 30"
Final general classification[29]
Rank Rider Team Time
1   Jakob Fuglsang (DEN)   Astana 29h 05' 54"
2   Richie Porte (AUS) BMC Racing Team + 10"
3   Dan Martin (IRL) Quick-Step Floors + 1' 32"
4   Chris Froome (GBR) Team Sky + 1' 33"
5   Fabio Aru (ITA) Astana + 1' 37"
6   Romain Bardet (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 2' 04"
7   Emanuel Buchmann (GER)   Bora–Hansgrohe + 2' 32"
8   Louis Meintjes (RSA) UAE Team Emirates + 3' 12"
9   Alejandro Valverde (ESP) Movistar Team + 4' 08"
10   Rafael Valls (ESP) Lotto–Soudal + 4' 40"

Classification leadership tableEdit

In the Critérium du Dauphiné, four different jerseys were awarded. The most important was the general classification, which was calculated by adding each cyclist's finishing times on each stage. Time bonuses were awarded to the first three finishers on all stages except for the individual time trial: the stage winner won a ten-second bonus, with six and four seconds for the second and third riders respectively. The rider with the least accumulated time is the race leader, identified by a yellow jersey with a blue bar; the winner of this classification was considered the winner of the race.[30]

Points for the points classification
Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Stages 1–3 & 5 25 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6
Stages 4, 6–8 15 12 10 8 6 5 4 3 2 1

Additionally, there was a points classification, which awarded a green jersey. In the classification, cyclists received points for finishing in the top 10 in a stage. More points were awarded on the flatter stages in the opening half of the race.[30]

Points for the mountains classification
Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points for Hors-category 15 12 10 8 6 5 4 3 2 1
Points for Category 1 10 8 6 4 2 1 0
Points for Category 2 5 3 2 1 0
Points for Category 3 2 1 0
Points for Category 4 1 0

There was also a mountains classification, the leadership of which was marked by a red jersey with white polka dots. In the mountains classification, points towards the classification were won by reaching the top of a climb before other cyclists. Each climb was categorised as either hors, first, second, third, or fourth-category, with more points available for the higher-categorised climbs. Hors-category climbs awarded the most points; the first ten riders were able to accrue points, compared with the first six on first-category climbs, the first four on second-category, the first two on third-category and only the first for fourth-category.[30]

The fourth jersey represented the young rider classification, marked by a white jersey. This was decided the same way as the general classification, but only riders born on or after 1 January 1992 were eligible to be ranked in the classification. There was also a team classification, in which the times of the best three cyclists per team on each stage were added together; the leading team at the end of the race was the team with the lowest total time.[30]

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
 
Points classification
 
Mountains classification
 
Young rider classification
 
Team classification
 
1[31] Thomas De Gendt Thomas De Gendt Thomas De Gendt[a] Thomas De Gendt[a][b] Pierre Latour Lotto–Soudal
2[32] Arnaud Démare Sonny Colbrelli
3[33] Koen Bouwman Arnaud Démare
4[34] Richie Porte Sam Oomen Movistar Team
5[35] Phil Bauhaus Koen Bouwman
6[36] Jakob Fuglsang Richie Porte Emanuel Buchmann AG2R La Mondiale
7[37] Peter Kennaugh
8[1] Jakob Fuglsang Jakob Fuglsang
Final[1] Jakob Fuglsang[38] Arnaud Démare[39] Koen Bouwman[40] Emanuel Buchmann[41] AG2R La Mondiale[42]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b In stage 2, Axel Domont, who was second in the points and mountains classifications, wore the green points jersey, because Thomas De Gendt (in first place) wore the yellow and blue jersey as leader of the general classification during that stage. Ángel Madrazo, who was third in the mountains classification, wore the red and white polka-dot jersey as a result of this.
  2. ^ In stages 3 to 5, Koen Bouwman, who was second in the mountains classification, wore the red and white polka-dot jersey, because Thomas De Gendt (in first place) wore the yellow and blue jersey as leader of the general classification during that stage.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Jakob Fuglsang wins Criterium du Dauphine". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 11 June 2017. Retrieved 11 June 2017.
  2. ^ "UCI expands WorldTour to 37 events". Cycling News. Retrieved 2 October 2016.
  3. ^ "The UCI reveals expanded UCI WorldTour calendar for 2017". UCI. Retrieved 2 October 2016.
  4. ^ "Jakob Fuglsang adds Denmark on the record book of the Dauphiné". Critérium du Dauphiné. ASO. 11 June 2017. Archived from the original on 15 July 2017. Retrieved 11 June 2017.
  5. ^ Wynn, Nigel (26 January 2017). "Tour de France 2017 wildcard teams announced". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 5 June 2017. Cofidis, Direct Energie and Fortuneo-Vital Concept will join French team Delko Marseille Provence KTM at Paris-Nice, with Cofidis, Delko Marseille Provence KTM, Direct Energie and Wanty-Groupe Gobert attending the Critérium du Dauphiné.
  6. ^ "2017 Critérium du Dauphiné route features novel ascent of Alpe d'Huez". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 16 March 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  7. ^ "2017 Route". Critérium du Dauphiné. ASO. Archived from the original on 6 June 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  8. ^ "Stage 1". Critérium du Dauphiné. ASO. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  9. ^ Windsor, Richard (4 June 2017). "Thomas De Gendt takes solo win on Critérium du Dauphiné stage one". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  10. ^ "De Gendt takes Dauphiné opening stage". VeloNews. Competitor Group. Agence France-Presse. 4 June 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  11. ^ "Stage 2". Critérium du Dauphiné. ASO. Archived from the original on 6 June 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  12. ^ Windsor, Richard (5 June 2017). "Arnaud Démare sprints to win on Critérium du Dauphiné stage two as Thomas De Gendt retains lead". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  13. ^ "Dauphiné stage 2: Démare sprints to victory". VeloNews. Competitor Group. 5 June 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  14. ^ "Stage 3". Critérium du Dauphiné. ASO. Archived from the original on 6 June 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  15. ^ Windsor, Richard (6 June 2017). "Sprinters foiled as breakaway stays away on Critérium du Dauphiné stage three". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
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  21. ^ Marshall-Bell, Chris (8 June 2017). "German sprinter Phil Bauhaus takes surprise win on stage five of Critérium du Dauphiné". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
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  24. ^ Cunningham, Craig (9 June 2017). "Jakob Fuglsang narrowly beats Richie Porte and Chris Froome to win Critérium du Dauphiné stage six". Cycling Weekly. Time Inc. UK. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  25. ^ "Dauphiné: Fuglsang wins stage 6; Porte takes lead". VeloNews. Competitor Group. 9 June 2017. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  26. ^ "Stage 7". Critérium du Dauphiné. ASO. Archived from the original on 4 June 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  27. ^ a b "Dauphiné: Porte punishes Froome, Kennaugh takes stage". VeloNews. Competitor Group. 10 June 2017. Retrieved 11 June 2017.
  28. ^ "Stage 8". Critérium du Dauphiné. ASO. Archived from the original on 4 June 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  29. ^ a b "Denmark's Fuglsang wins Dauphiné". VeloNews. Competitor Group. Agence France-Presse. 11 June 2017. Retrieved 11 June 2017.
  30. ^ a b c d "Règlement" [Regulations] (PDF). Critérium du Dauphiné (in French). Amaury Sport Organisation. Retrieved 4 June 2017.
  31. ^ Farrand, Stephen (4 June 2017). "Criterium du Dauphine: De Gendt solos to stage 1 victory". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  32. ^ O'Shea, Sadhbh (5 June 2017). "Criterium du Dauphine: Demare sprints to stage 2 victory". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  33. ^ Ryan, Barry (6 June 2017). "Criterium du Dauphine: Bouwman wins stage 3 as the break holds off the sprinters". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  34. ^ Ryan, Barry (7 June 2017). "Dauphine: Porte wins stage 4 time trial". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 7 June 2017.
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  38. ^ "Classement général: étape 8" [General classification: stage 8]. Tissot (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 11 June 2017. Retrieved 11 June 2017.
  39. ^ "Classement par points 8" [Points classification 8]. Tissot (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 11 June 2017. Retrieved 11 June 2017.
  40. ^ "Classement du meilleur grimpeur 8" [Best climber classification 8]. Tissot (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 11 June 2017. Retrieved 11 June 2017.
  41. ^ "Classement des jeunes 8" [Youth classification 8]. Tissot (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 11 June 2017. Retrieved 11 June 2017.
  42. ^ "Classement par equipes 8" [Teams classification 8]. Tissot (in French). Swiss Timing Ltd. 11 June 2017. Retrieved 11 June 2017.

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