2011–12 in the Mexican drug war

In 2011 and 2012, during the Mexican drug war, hundreds of people were killed in massacres by rival drug cartels who were fighting for power and territory. These organized-crime syndicates were grappling for control over the drug corridors to the United States, the drug markets in local cities, extortion rackets, and human smuggling. Massacres occurred in the states of Veracruz, Sinaloa, Jalisco, Tamaulipas and Nuevo León.

IncidentsEdit

Los Zetas presence
Sinaloa Cartel presence

Mexican organized-crime groups often leave bodies in public places as a warning to rivals.[1] Most of the 2011–2012 massacres were committed by the rival Sinaloa and Los Zetas cartels throughout Mexico.[2] The killings were described as "the latest salvo in a gruesome game of tit-for-tat in fighting" by Mexican drug cartels.[3]

VeracruzEdit

 
Sinaloa Cartel logo

Eye-for-an-eye fighting between Los Zetas and the Sinaloa Cartel began in the fall of 2011 in Veracruz, a strategic smuggling state with a large Gulf port.[4] On 20 September, two trucks containing 35 bodies were found in an underpass near a shopping mall in Boca del Río.[5] The bodies were allegedly members of Los Zetas,[6] but it was later found that only six had been involved in minor crimes; none were involved with organized crime.[7] Some of the victims had their hands tied, and showed signs of having been tortured.[8] According to El Universal, at about 5:00 p.m. a number of vehicles blocked a major street in Boca del Río.[9] When the traffic stopped, armed men abandoned two trucks in the middle of the road.[9] They opened the truck doors and pulled out the thirty-five bodies, leaving a written message behind.[9] Other gunmen pointed weapons at the frightened drivers[10] before the cartel members fled the scene.[11]

The Blog del Narco reported on September 21 that the message was signed by Gente Nueva, an enforcement group which worked for Sinaloa boss Joaquín Guzmán Loera.[12] On 27 September the Jalisco New Generation Cartel released a video claiming that they had carried out the attacks on Los Zetas, however, and were planning to take over Veracruz.[13]

On 6 October in Boca del Río, 36 bodies were found by authorities in three houses.[14] Mexican Navy soldiers first discovered 20 bodies in a house in a residential neighbourhood; while searching another house, they found 11 more bodies.[15] A third house contained one body,[15] and four other bodies were confirmed by the Veracruz state government.[16] A day later, Attorney General Reynaldo Escobar Pérez resigned due to the drug violence.[17] A day after his resignation, 10 more bodies were found in the city of Veracruz.[18] The Jalisco New Generation Cartel was responsible for 67 killings in Veracruz on 7 October.[19]

On 11 June 2012 in Álamo, Veracruz, 14 dismembered bodies were abandoned in a truck on a highway near the Tamaulipas border.[20] Alerted by an anonymous call, the bodies were found at 8:00 p.m. and authorities finished picking them up at about 7:00 a.m. the following day.[21][22] Security was increased in the area after the discovery.[23]

SinaloaEdit

In response to the killings in Veracruz, Los Zetas left 26 bodies (16 burned to death) in abandoned vehicles in Sinaloa on 23 November.[24][25] Early that morning, a vehicle was discovered on fire in Culiacán.[26] When police put out the fire, they found a dozen bodies burned to death, handcuffed, with wood on top of them.[26] At 7:00 a.m., anonymous calls notified police that another vehicle in the north of the city was on fire. Four bodies, wearing bulletproof vests and handcuffed, were found inside.[26] The following night, 10 more bodies were found in several municipalities.[26]

On 5 June 2012, the bodies of seven men were dumped on a street in Culiacán in 13 plastic bags.[27] Authorities initially thought that the victims were police officers because their clothing resembled that of a special-operations unit,[27] but they concluded that the uniforms were not those of a police agency,[27] A message was left behind by the killers blaming authorities for cooperating with Sinaloa Cartel boss Joaquín Guzmán Loera, also known as "El Chapo".[28] and accusing President Felipe Calderón and state authorities of protecting the cartel.[29] In 2010 and 2011, it was also claimed that the state government and police protected the cartel.[29] The addition of bodies to the messages suggested that the killers were trying to attract more attention to alleged cartel-government collusion.[29]

JaliscoEdit

2011 Guadalajara massacreEdit

In response to the Sinaloa Cartel incursions, Los Zetas conducted a massacre in the state of Jalisco.[30][31] On 24 November 2011, three trucks containing 26 male bodies were found on a main street in Guadalajara.[32] All of them being male corpses.[33] At about 7:00 pm, city police received several anonymous calls reporting that "several vehicles with more than 10 bodies had been abandoned" on a major thoroughfare.[34] When police arrived, they found a green minivan in the middle lane of the highway; a cargo van was 66 feet (20 meters) away,[34] and another van was in the right lane.[34] Los Zetas and the Milenio Cartel were reportedly responsible for the massacre of the twenty-six alleged Sinaloa Cartel members.[35][36]

2012 Chapala massacreEdit

Los Zetas responded to the 2012 Nuevo Laredo massacres[37][38] by leaving the dismembered remains of 18 people in a Toyota Sienna and Ford EcoSport near U.S. retiree communities in Chapala, Jalisco, south of Guadalajara.[39][40][41] Eighteen heads were found with the dismembered bodies; some had been frozen, others were covered with lime, and the rest were in an advanced state of decomposition.[42] An anonymous call alerted police to the abandoned vehicles, which were found at the side of a highway early on the morning on 9 May 2012.[43] The vehicles were towed to government offices to unload the bodies.[44] Authorities confirmed that a message was left by the killers, presumably from Los Zetas and the Milenio Cartel.[41]

TamaulipasEdit

2011 San Fernando massacreEdit

One hundred ninety-three people were killed by Los Zetas at the La Joya ranch in the municipality of San Fernando.[45] Authorities investigating the massacre reported bus hijackings on Mexican Federal Highway 101 in San Fernando, and the kidnap victims were later killed and buried in 47 clandestine mass graves.[45] The investigations began immediately after suitcases and other baggage were unclaimed in Reynosa and Matamoros.[46] On 6 April 2011, authorities exhumed 59 bodies from eight mass graves;[47] by 7 June, after several excavations, 193 bodies had been exhumed from mass graves in San Fernando.[48]

2012 Nuevo Laredo massacresEdit

The dismembered remains of 14 men were found on 17 April 2012 in plastic bags inside a Chrysler Voyager in the border city of Nuevo Laredo.[49] The victims were between the ages of 30 and 35.[50] Authorities said that they found a "message signed by a criminal group," but did not release its contents[51] or indicate if those killed were members of Los Zetas or the Gulf Cartel.[52] According to CNN México, the message said that the group intended to "clean up Nuevo Laredo" by killing Zeta members.[53] However, The Monitor reported that a source outside law enforcement but with knowledge of the attacks said that the bodies were those of Los Zetas members who had been killed by the Jalisco New Generation Cartel (a branch of the Sinaloa Cartel).[54] After the attacks, Sinaloa Cartel boss Joaquín Guzmán Loera (better known as "El Chapo Guzmán") sent a message to Los Zetas that his cartel would fight for control of the Nuevo Laredo plaza.[55]

Twenty-three bodies (14 decapitated and nine hanged from a bridge) were discovered in Nuevo Laredo in an escalation of violence by rival drug gangs on the U.S. border.[56] At about 1:00 a.m. on 4 May 2012, nine people were hanged from a bridge on Federal Highway 85D with a message left by the killers.[57] Motorists found the bodies of four women and five men.[58] The message left behind reportedly said that the victims were the perpetrators of a 24 April car bombing in the city.[56] The victims were reportedly members of the Gulf Cartel who were killed by Los Zetas for "heating up" their territory.[59] Hours later, 14 decapitated bodies were abandoned inside a vehicle in front of the customs agency;[60] their severed heads were in coolers in front of the municipal building.[60] Police said that the second massacre may have been revenge by the Gulf Cartel to Los Zetas for the earlier killings.[61][62] With the bodies was a message, reportedly signed by El Chapo, demanding that Nuevo Laredo mayor Benjamín Galván and other municipal and state leaders and public-safety officials recognize his and the Sinaloa Cartel's presence in the region.[63]

2012 Ciudad Mante massacresEdit

During the afternoon of 7 June 2012, outside the Ciudad Mante city hall, 14 mutilated bodies were discovered in a parked truck.[64] Ciudad Mante, 250 miles south of Texas, is a sugar-cane-growing community with nearly 110,000 people.[65][66] Investigators said that the victims (11 men and three women) were found with a message.[67] According to Proceso magazine, the message was from the Sinaloa Cartel to Los Zetas (which controlled the city's drug trafficking).[68] Milenio confirmed that the Gulf Cartel had killed the 14 people, allegedly members of Los Zetas, as retaliation for grenade attacks in Matamoros (Gulf Cartel headquarters).[69] The Blog del Narco posted a video on its website from an anonymous source.[70]

In response to the Gulf Cartel attacks, Los Zetas left 14 mutilated bodies in an abandoned bus in a Ciudad Mante shopping-center parking lot.[71] The bodies of ten men and four women, reported at about 9 a.m. on 23 June 2012, were left with a message to the Gulf Cartel[71] which was not revealed by authorities.[72] The bodies were discovered a day after grenade attacks in the capital city of Ciudad Victoria injured eight people.[73]

Nuevo LeónEdit

2012 Apodaca prison riotEdit

On 19 February 2012, at a prison in Apodaca,[74] at least 44 people were killed and 12 injured.[74] Blog del Narco, an anonymous blog documenting the Mexican drug war, reported that the actual death toll might be over 70.[75] The riot involved Los Zetas and the Gulf Cartel, which operate in northeastern Mexico.[76] Nuevo León governor Rodrigo Medina said on 20 February 2012 that 30 prisoners escaped during the riot,[77] but the number was reduced to 29 four days later.[78] On 16 March, the Nuevo León attorney general's office said that 37 prisoners had escaped on the day of the massacre.[79] One of the fugitives, Óscar Manuel Bernal (known as "La Araña", or the Spider), was considered by authorities to be "extremely dangerous" and was believed to be the leader of Los Zetas in Monterrey Municipality.[80] Other fugitives were leaders of the cartel.[81]

2012 Cadereyta Jiménez massacreEdit

On 13 May 2012 on Federal Highway 40 in the city of Cadereyta Jiménez, 49 people were decapitated and mutilated by members of Los Zetas and dumped on a roadside near the city of Monterrey in northern Mexico.[82][83] The bodies were found in the town of San Juan in Cadereyta Jiménez at about 4 a.m. on a highway leading to Reynosa.[84][85] The forty-three male and six female victims had their heads, feet, and hands cut off, making identification difficult.[82] With signs of torture, they were stuffed in plastic bags.[86] Four days before the massacre, 18 people were found decapitated and dismembered near Guadalajara (Mexico's second-largest city).[87] The massacre echoed others conducted by drug cartels.[88] Authorities blamed much of the violence on Los Zetas (a cartel set up by commandos who deserted from the Mexican Army during the 1990s) and the Sinaloa Cartel, headed by Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán.[89][90]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "49 bodies left on Mexican highway". Brisbane Times. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 15 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  2. ^ "Mexican officials report 49 bodies dumped on highway to US border". The Washington Post. 13 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012.[dead link]
  3. ^ Rodriguez, Olga (14 May 2012). "49 headless bodies dumped on north Mexico highway". Yahoo! News. Archived from the original on 16 May 2012. Retrieved 14 May 2012.
  4. ^ "49 bodies with heads, hands and feet chopped off found on Mexican highway leading to US border". The Washington Post. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 15 May 2012. Retrieved 14 May 2012.
  5. ^ "35 bodies found in Mexican roadway during rush hour". CNN. 20 September 2011. Archived from the original on 11 October 2012.
  6. ^ "35 muertos de Boca del Río serían Zetas: Autoridades". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). 21 September 2011. Archived from the original on 27 December 2011. Retrieved 11 March 2012.
  7. ^ Martínez, Chivis (8 June 2012). "Bodies of Innocents Used as Props in Mexico's Drug War". InSight Crime. Archived from the original on 16 June 2012. Retrieved 9 June 2012.
  8. ^ "Mexico gunmen abandon two trucks with 35 bodies inside". BBC News. 21 September 2011. Archived from the original on 2 March 2012. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  9. ^ a b c "Veracruz: tiran a 35 ejecutados en zona turística". El Universal (in Spanish). 21 September 2011. Archived from the original on 27 December 2011. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  10. ^ Castillo, Eduardo (21 September 2011). "Mexico Horror: Suspected Drug Traffickers Dump 35 Bodies On Avenue In Veracruz". The Huffington Post. Archived from the original on 2 January 2012. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  11. ^ "Arrojan 35 cuerpos torturados en una calle de Veracruz". El Mundo (in Spanish). 21 September 2011. Archived from the original on 14 August 2012. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  12. ^ Booth, William (21 September 2011). "35 bodies dumped in Mexican city as president begins effort to woo tourists". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 7 May 2012. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  13. ^ "Comando armado se responsabiliza por cádaveres arrojados en Veracruz". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). 27 September 2011. Archived from the original on 30 December 2011. Retrieved 11 March 2012.
  14. ^ "Marina reporta el hallazgo de 32 cuerpos en Veracruz; la Procuraduría, 4". CNN Mexico (in Spanish). 6 October 2011. Archived from the original on 2012-05-13. Retrieved 2012-05-14.
  15. ^ a b "Mexico: 32 Bodies Are Found in Veracruz Houses". Los Angeles Times. 7 October 2011. Archived from the original on 13 October 2011. Retrieved 10 May 2012.
  16. ^ "Son 36 los cadáveres hallados en Veracruz". Televisa (in Spanish). 7 October 2011. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 10 May 2012.
  17. ^ "El procurador de Veracruz renuncia a su cargo tras una ola de violencia". CNNMéxico (in Spanish). 7 October 2011. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 10 May 2012.
  18. ^ Soberanes, Rodrigo (8 October 2011). "Otros 10 cadáveres son encontrados en el estado de Veracruz". CNNMéxico (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 2012-03-18. Retrieved 21 March 2012.
  19. ^ "Caen 'Matazetas' ligados a cadáveres en Veracruz". Terra Networks (in Spanish). 7 October 2011. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 11 March 2012.
  20. ^ "Mexican police find 14 bodies in Gulf coast state of Veracruz". The Washington Post. 12 June 2012. Archived from the original on 15 December 2018. Retrieved 12 June 2012.
  21. ^ "Autoridades hallan 14 cuerpos en los límites de Veracruz y Tamaulipas". CNNMéxico (in Spanish). 12 June 2012. Archived from the original on 12 June 2012. Retrieved 12 June 2012.
  22. ^ "Fourteen bodies found in eastern Mexico: officials". Agence France-Presse. 12 June 2012. Retrieved 13 June 2012.
  23. ^ "Mexico: 14 bodies found in abandoned truck". CNN. 12 June 2012. Retrieved 13 June 2012.
  24. ^ "Mexico Security Memo: Los Zetas Strike in Sinaloa Territory". Stratfor. Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 11 March 2012.
  25. ^ "Las autoridades de Sinaloa localizan 23 cadáveres en tres municipios". CNN Mexico (in Spanish). 23 November 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-11-23. Retrieved 24 November 2011.
  26. ^ a b c d "26 muertos en Sinaloa; 16 fueron calcinados". El Universal (in Spanish). 24 November 2011. Archived from the original on 28 December 2011. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  27. ^ a b c "7 Mutilated bodies found in northwest Mexico". Fox News. 8 June 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-06-09. Retrieved 9 June 2012.
  28. ^ "7 dismembered bodies found in Mexican Pacific Coast state of Sinaloa". The Washington Post. 5 June 2012. Retrieved 9 June 2012.[dead link]
  29. ^ a b c Fox, Edward (5 June 2012). "7 Dead in Sinaloa Alongside Banner Claiming State Collusion With Chapo Guzman". InSight Crime. Archived from the original on 14 June 2012. Retrieved 9 June 2012.
  30. ^ "Ligan al cártel del Milenio-Z con hallazgo de 26 cuerpos en Guadalajara". Proceso (in Spanish). 24 November 2011. Archived from the original on 28 January 2012. Retrieved 11 March 2012.
  31. ^ "Guadalajara: Posible guerra Zetas-cartel Sinaloa deja 26 muertos". Yahoo News (in Spanish). 24 November 2011. Archived from the original on 28 November 2011. Retrieved 11 March 2012.
  32. ^ "26 cadáveres son abandonados en camionetas, en una avenida de Guadalajara". CNN Mexico (in Spanish). 24 November 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-11-24. Retrieved 24 November 2011.
  33. ^ "26 bodies dumped in mass slaying in Guadalajara". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 24 November 2011.
  34. ^ a b c "Hallan al menos 20 cadáveres en Guadalajara". El Universal (in Spanish). 24 November 2011. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  35. ^ "El Cártel del Milenio y Los Zetas se atribuyen masacre en Guadalajara". Univision (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 25 January 2016. Retrieved 25 November 2011.
  36. ^ Finnegan, William (2 July 2012). "THE KINGPINS: The fight for Guadalajara". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on 14 July 2012. Retrieved 10 July 2012.
  37. ^ "Suman 18 los muertos encontrados en Chapala, Jalisco: Procuraduría". Proceso (in Spanish). 9 May 2012. Retrieved 11 May 2012.
  38. ^ "Descuartizados son en respuesta a los de Nuevo Laredo - Procurador". Blog del Narco (in Spanish). 9 May 2012. Archived from the original on 12 May 2012. Retrieved 10 May 2012.
  39. ^ "Narcoviolencia vuelve a Jalisco; hallan 18 cuerpos en dos vehículos". Excélsior (in Spanish). 10 May 2012. Retrieved 10 May 2012.
  40. ^ "At least 15 bodies found near U.S. retiree hamlet in Mexico". Los Angeles Times. 9 May 2012. Archived from the original on 11 May 2012. Retrieved 10 May 2012.
  41. ^ a b "Dejan a 15 ejecutados en una camioneta en Jalisco". Blog del Narco (in Spanish). 9 May 2012. Archived from the original on 12 May 2012. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  42. ^ Looft, Christopher (10 May 2012). "With 18 Killed, Zetas Bring Nuevo Laredo War to Jalisco". InSight Crime. Archived from the original on 18 May 2012. Retrieved 11 May 2012.
  43. ^ "Fifteen decapitated in apparent Mexico revenge attack". Yahoo! News. 9 May 2012. Archived from the original on 3 April 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  44. ^ "Mexican police discover at least 15 dismembered bodies near Guadalajara". The Guardian. London. 9 May 2012. Archived from the original on 3 April 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  45. ^ a b "Aumenta a 193 los muertos por matanza en San Fernando, Tamaulipas: PGR". Milenio (in Spanish). 7 June 2011. Archived from the original on 9 June 2011. Retrieved 9 March 2012.
  46. ^ "México: Maletas abandonadas, pista para esclarecer asesinatos en Tamaulipas". Terra Networks (in Spanish). 19 April 2011. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 9 March 2012.
  47. ^ Chapa, Sergio (6 April 2011). "59 bodies found in eight mass graves near San Fernando". KGBT-TV. Archived from the original on 12 April 2011. Retrieved 13 March 2012.
  48. ^ Chapa, Sergio (7 June 2011). "San Fernando body count climbs to 193". KGBT-TV. Archived from the original on 23 October 2013. Retrieved 13 March 2012.
  49. ^ "Mexico authorities say bodies of 14 men dumped in Nuevo Laredo". Los Angeles Times. 17 April 2012. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2012.
  50. ^ "Localizan 14 cadáveres dentro de vehículo abandonado en Nuevo Laredo". Milenio (in Spanish). 17 April 2012. Archived from the original on 4 September 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2012.
  51. ^ "14 mutilated bodies found in Mexican border city". El Paso Times. 17 April 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2012.[permanent dead link]
  52. ^ Mosso, Rubén (18 April 2012). "Nuevo Laredo: hallan 14 cuerpos mutilados". Milenio (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 4 January 2013. Retrieved 18 April 2012.
  53. ^ "14 cuerpos mutilados fueron hallados en Nuevo Laredo". CNNMéxico (in Spanish). 17 April 2012. Archived from the original on 21 April 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2012.
  54. ^ "14 bodies found in minivan outside Nuevo Laredo City Hall, according to Tamps. gov't". The Monitor. 17 April 2012. Archived from the original on 27 April 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2012.
  55. ^ "El Chapo demuestra su poder en Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas". Blog del Narco (in Spanish). 18 April 2012. Archived from the original on 20 April 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2012.
  56. ^ a b "Nuevo Laredo vive un viernes negro, jornada violenta deja 23 muertos". Excélsior (in Spanish). 4 May 2012. Archived from the original on 28 December 2011. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  57. ^ "Los cuerpos de 23 personas son encontrados en Nuevo Laredo". CNNMéxico (in Spanish). 4 May 2012. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  58. ^ "23 dead in day of horror for Mexico border city". Yahoo! News. 4 May 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-05-16. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  59. ^ "Suman 23 muertos en Nuevo Laredo, entre colgados y decapitados". Univision (in Spanish). 4 May 2012. Archived from the original on 5 May 2012. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  60. ^ a b "Van 23 muertos en Nuevo Laredo, en ola de violencia". El Universal (in Spanish). 4 May 2012. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  61. ^ "Bodies of 23 found dumped near U.S. border in Mexico drug war". Yahoo! News. 4 May 2012. Archived from the original on 8 May 2012. Retrieved 4 May 2012.
  62. ^ "Se recrudece violencia en Nuevo Laredo: 23 muertos". El Universal (in Spanish). 5 May 2012. Archived from the original on 7 May 2012. Retrieved 5 May 2012.
  63. ^ "Pide "El Chapo Guzman" al alcalde de Nuevo Laredo que deje de negar su presencia". La Policiaca (in Spanish). 6 May 2012. Archived from the original on 8 May 2012. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  64. ^ "Mexico: 14 dismembered bodies found outside city hall". CNN. 8 June 2012. Retrieved 9 June 2012.
  65. ^ Chapa, Sergio (8 June 2012). "14 dismembered bodies left in front of Ciudad Mante City Hall". KGBT-TV. Retrieved 9 June 2012.
  66. ^ "14 mutilated bodies found in Mexico". Sky News. 8 June 2012. Archived from the original on 3 February 2016. Retrieved 9 June 2012.
  67. ^ "Dismembered bodies of 14 reported dumped in northern Mexico". Los Angeles Times. 8 June 2012. Archived from the original on 9 June 2012. Retrieved 9 June 2012.
  68. ^ "Documentan en Youtube narcoviolencia en Tamaulipas". Proceso (in Spanish). 11 June 2012. Retrieved 12 June 2012.
  69. ^ Mosso, Rubén (14 June 2012). "Ataques en Matamoros para afectar al Cártel del Golfo: Sedena". Milenio (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 2012-06-17. Retrieved 14 June 2012.
  70. ^ "Video: Abandonan camión con 14 descuartizados en Tamaulipas". Blog del Narco (in Spanish). 27 June 2012. Archived from the original on 19 April 2013. Retrieved 28 June 2012.
  71. ^ a b "Hallan 14 cuerpos mutilados en centro comercial de Tamaulipas, México". Univision (in Spanish). 23 June 2012. Archived from the original on 24 June 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2012.
  72. ^ "Abandonan camión con 14 cuerpos mutilados en Cd. Mante, Tamaulipas". La Jornada (in Spanish). 23 June 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-06-25. Retrieved 24 June 2012.
  73. ^ "Dejan camión con 14 cadáveres mutilados en estacionamiento, en Tamaulipas". Proceso (in Spanish). 23 June 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2012.
  74. ^ a b "Dozens killed in Mexico prison fight". Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on 21 February 2012. Retrieved 19 February 2012.
  75. ^ "Motín en Nuevo León: oficial 38 reos muertos, extraoficial al menos 70". Blog del Narco (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 19 February 2012.
  76. ^ "Drug cartel blamed in prison riot that killed 44". San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 21 February 2012.
  77. ^ "Funcionarios, cómplices en fuga de 30 reos en Apodaca, dice el gobernador". CNNMexico (in Spanish). 20 February 2012. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  78. ^ "Son 29 fugados de Apodaca, rectifica PGJNL". El Universal (in Spanish). 24 February 2012. Retrieved 25 February 2012.
  79. ^ "Del penal de Apodaca se fugaron 37 reos, no 29, corrigen las autoridades". Animal Politico (in Spanish). 16 March 2012. Archived from the original on 18 March 2012. Retrieved 18 March 2012.
  80. ^ "Reo fugado en NL, de alta peligrosidad". El Universal (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 23 February 2012. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  81. ^ "Eran ex jefes de plaza algunos de los fugados". Milenio (in Spanish). 21 February 2012. Archived from the original on 27 March 2012. Retrieved 30 March 2012.
  82. ^ a b "Official: 49 bodies left on Mexico highway". Yahoo! News. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 16 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  83. ^ "Mexico violence: Monterrey police find 49 bodies". BBC News. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 13 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  84. ^ "49 bodies dumped on Mexican highway". CBS News. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 14 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  85. ^ "Autoridades hallan 49 cadáveres en una carretera de Nuevo León". CNNMéxico (in Spanish). 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 2012-05-13. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  86. ^ "49 bodies left on Mexican highway". The Sydney Morning Herald. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 15 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  87. ^ "Scores of mutilated bodies dumped on Mexico highway". BBC News. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 14 May 2012. Retrieved 14 May 2012.
  88. ^ "Discovery of mutilated bodies shuts down Reynosa, Monterrey highway". KGBT-TV. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 3 February 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  89. ^ "Mexican police find 49 mutilated bodies". Agence France-Presse. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 15 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  90. ^ "Dozens of bodies found in bags". Herald Sun. 13 May 2012. Retrieved 14 May 2012.

External linksEdit