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2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida

The 2004 United States House of Representatives Elections in Florida were held on November 2, 2004 to determine who would represent the state of Florida in the United States House of Representatives. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected served in the 109th Congress from January 3, 2005 to January 3, 2007. The election coincided with the 2004 U.S. presidential election as well as an election to the United States Senate.

Florida had twenty-five seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its delegation to the 108th Congress of 2003-2005 consisted of eighteen Republicans and seven Democrats. In 2004, no districts changed party control, leaving the congressional delegation as an 18-7 split favoring the Republicans.

The following Congresspeople went unopposed in the 2004 election and thus their election is not reported below:

OverviewEdit

United States House of Representatives elections in Florida, 2004[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 3,319,296 58.98% 18 +/- 0
Democratic 2,212,324 39.31% 7 +/- 0
Other Parties 95,874 1.70% 0 +/- 0
Totals 5,627,494 100% 25 +/- 0

District 1Edit

Incumbent Republican representative Jeff Miller, who was initially elected in a special election in 2001, ran for re-election in this staunchly conservative district based in the Florida Panhandle. Miller easily defeated Democratic challenger Mark Coutu.

Florida's 1st congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeff Miller (inc.) 236,604 76.5
Democratic Mark S. Coutu 72,506 23.5
Total votes 309,110 100.00
Republican hold

District 2Edit

The incumbent was Democrat Allen Boyd, first elected to this seat in 1997. Other contestants in this race included Republican challenger Bev Kilmer, who had served in the Florida House of Representatives,[2] and write-in candidate T. A. Frederick.

Shortly before the election, a company owned by Kilmer's husband sued Boyd for defamation of character.[3] Nonetheless, Boyd was reelected with slightly under 62 percent of the vote.

Florida's 2nd congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Allen Boyd (incumbent) 201,577 61.6
Republican Bev Kilmer 125,399 38.4
Independent T. A. Frederick (write-in) 11 0.0
Total votes 326,987 100.00
Democratic hold

District 3Edit

Democrat Corrine Brown, the incumbent since 1993, faced no major-party opposition and easily won re-election over write-in candidate Johnny Brown.

Florida's 2nd congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Corrine Brown (incumbent) 172,833 99.2
Independent Johnny M. Brown (write-in) 1,323 0.8
Total votes 174,156 100.00
Democratic hold

District 4Edit

Incumbent Republican Ander Crenshaw faced only marginal opposition from the write-in campaign of perennial candidate Richard Grayson.[4] Crenshaw easily won another term.

Florida's 4th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ander Crenshaw (inc.) 256,157 99.5
Independent Richard Grayson (write-in) 1,170 0.5
Total votes 257,327 100.00
Republican hold

District 5Edit

Incumbent Republican Ginny Brown-Waite easily won re-election against attorney Robert Whittel in a race that was not viewed as competitive.[5]

Florida's 5th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ginny Brown-Waite (inc.) 240,315 65.9
Democratic Robert G. Whittel 124,140 34.1
Independent H. David Werder (write-in) 33 0.0
Total votes 364,488 100.00
Republican hold

District 6Edit

Encompassing North Central Florida, this conservative district is represented by incumbent Republican Congressman Cliff Stearns. Stearns, seeking a ninth term, faced off against Democrat Dave Bruderly and won the election by a wide margin.

Florida's 6th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Cliff Stearns (inc.) 211,137 64.4
Democratic David E. Bruderly 116,680 35.6
Independent N. W. O’Brien (write-in) 36 0.0
Total votes 327,853 100.00
Republican hold

District 8Edit

Republican Congressman Ric Keller, seeking a third term, faced off against libertarian Democrat Stephen Murray.[6] Keller won re-election with over 60% of the vote.

Florida's 8th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ric Keller (inc.) 172,232 60.5
Democratic Charlie Stuart 112,343 39.5
Total votes 284,575 100.00
Republican hold

District 9Edit

Republican incumbent Congressman Michael Bilirakis ran for a twelfth term. Bilirakis faced no major-party opposition in this Republican-leaning district.

Florida's 9th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael Bilirakis 284,035 99.9
Independent Andrew Pasayan (write-in) 243 0.1
Total votes 284,278 100.00
Republican hold

District 10Edit

Longtime incumbent Republican Bill Young won re-election over Democrat Bob Derry with almost 70% of the vote.

Florida's 10th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Young (inc.) 207,175 69.3
Democratic Robert D. "Bob" Derry 91,658 30.7
Total votes 298,833 100.00
Republican hold

District 11Edit

Incumbent Democratic Congressman Jim Davis ran for a fifth term in this liberal district based in Tampa. He faced no Republican challenger.

Florida's 11th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Davis (inc.) 191,780 85.8
Libertarian Robert E. Johnson 31,579 14.2
Independent Karl M. Butts (write-in) 122 0.0
Total votes 223,481 100.00
Democratic hold

District 12Edit

Incumbent Republican Adam Putnam won a third term, defeating Democrat Bob Hagenmaier. Putnam, who was the youngest member of the U.S. Congress before this election, received more than 10 times the campaign donations as his opponent and cruised to an easy victory.[7]

Florida's 12th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Adam Putnam (inc.) 179,204 64.9
Democratic Bob Hagenmaier 96,965 35.1
Total votes 276,169 100.00
Republican hold

District 13Edit

Incumbent Republican Katherine Harris sought a second term and defeated Democratic challenger Jan Schneider.

Florida's 13th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Katherine Harris (inc.) 190,477 55.3
Democratic Jan Schneider 153,961 44.7
Total votes 344,438 100.00
Republican hold

District 14Edit

This seat had been vacant since Porter Goss resigned on September 23 to serve as the director of the CIA. Republican Connie Mack IV won the open seat against Democratic candidate Robert Neeld in this solidly conservative district. Mack, the son of former U.S. Senator Connie Mack III, was aided by name recognition and fundraising connections[8] en route to an easy victory.

Florida's 14th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Connie Mack IV 226,662 67.6
Democratic Robert M. Neeld 108,672 32.4
Total votes 335,334 100.00
Republican hold

District 15Edit

Incumbent Republican Dave Weldon sought election to a sixth term in Congress. Weldon defeated the Democratic candidate, retired physicist Simon Pristoop, with 65% of the vote.[9]

Florida's 15th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dave Weldon (inc.) 210,388 65.4
Democratic Simon Pristoop 111,538 34.6
Total votes 321,926 100.00
Republican hold

District 16Edit

Incumbent Republican Mark Foley ran for a sixth term. He defeated Democrat Jeff Fisher by a wide margin.

Florida's 16th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Foley (inc.) 215,563 68.0
Democratic Jeff Fisher 101,247 32.0
Total votes 316,810 100.00
Republican hold

District 17Edit

Incumbent Democrat Kendrick Meek was re-elected to a second term in this heavily Democratic district. He faced no Republican challenger.

Florida's 17th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kendrick Meek (inc.) 178,690 99.6
Independent Omari Musa (write-in) 734 0.4
Total votes 179,424 100.00
Democratic hold

District 18Edit

Incumbent Republican Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen sought a ninth term and easily defeated Democratic nominee Sam Sheldon.

Florida's 18th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (inc.) 143,647 64.7
Democratic Sam Sheldon 78,281 35.3
Total votes 221,928 100.00
Republican hold

District 20Edit

Democratic incumbent Peter Deutsch decided to run for the U.S. Senate instead of seeking re-election. Democrat Debbie Wasserman Schultz won the open seat with over 70% of the vote.

Florida's 20th congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Debbie Wasserman Schultz 191,195 70.2
Republican Margaret Hostetter 81,213 29.8
Total votes 272,408 100.00
Democratic hold

District 21Edit

Incumbent Republican Lincoln Diaz-Balart ran for a seventh term in this suburban district. Diaz-Balart faced no Democratic challenger and easily won re-election.

Florida's 21st congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lincoln Diaz-Balart (inc.) 146,507 72.8
Libertarian Robert E. Johnson 54,736 27.2
Total votes 201,243 100.00
Republican hold

District 22Edit

Incumbent Republican Clay Shaw ran for a thirteenth term. Jim Stork was the Democratic nominee, but withdrew from the race before election night, citing health issues. Stork's name remained on the ballot, but votes for Stork were counted for Robin Rorapaugh, a staffer for Congressman Peter Deutsch.[10] Shaw easily won re-election.

Florida's 22nd congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Clay Shaw (inc.) 192,581 62.8
Democratic Jim Stork 108,258 35.3
Constitution Jack McLain 5,260 1.7
Independent Don Kennedy (write-in) 627 0.2
Total votes 306,726 100.00
Republican hold

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/2004/2004Stat.htm#9
  2. ^ "Lawmaker's widow to run for House". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  3. ^ "Political Ad Leads to a Lawsuit". www.wjhg.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  4. ^ Aaronson, Trevor (2 September 2004). "Last Candidate Standing". New Times Broward-Palm Beach. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  5. ^ Horowitz, Etan. "UPSET UNLIKELY IN HOUSE RACE". OrlandoSentinel.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  6. ^ Billman, Jeffrey C. "ELECTION POP QUIZ". Orlando Weekly. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  7. ^ ROUSOS, RICK. "Rep. Putnam Wins Third Term". The Ledger. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  8. ^ Hearn, Josephine (27 October 2004). "Mack: Help and hindrance from a known family name". TheHill. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  9. ^ "Reps. Harris, Boyd win heated battles for House seats". Gainesville Sun. The Associated Press. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  10. ^ Brittany, Wallman. "IN DISTRICT 22, STORK = RORAPAUGH". Sun-Sentinel.com. Retrieved 28 June 2019.