Open main menu

1992–93 FA Premier League

  (Redirected from 1992-93 Premier League)

The 1992–93 FA Premier League was the inaugural season of the Premier League, the top division of English football. The season began on 15 August 1992 and ended on 11 May 1993. The league was made up of the 22 clubs that broke away from The Football League at the end of the 1991–92 season. The new league was backed up by a five-year, £305 million deal with Sky to televise Premier League matches. In concept, the Premier League was identical to the old First Division of the Football League, which was now reduced to three divisions.

FA Premier League
Season1992–93
Dates15 August 1992–11 May 1993
ChampionsManchester United
1st Premier League title
8th English title
RelegatedCrystal Palace
Middlesbrough
Nottingham Forest
Champions LeagueManchester United
Cup Winners' CupArsenal
UEFA CupAston Villa
Norwich City
Goals scored1,222
Average goals/game2.65
Top goalscorerTeddy Sheringham (22)
Biggest home winBlackburn Rovers 7–1 Norwich City
(3 October 1992)
Sheffield United 6–0 Tottenham Hotspur
(2 March 1993)
Biggest away winManchester United 0–3 Everton
(19 August 1992)
Sheffield Wednesday 0–3 Manchester City
(5 September 1992)
Leeds United 1–4 Nottingham Forest
(5 December 1992)
Blackburn Rovers 2–5 Coventry City
(26 January 1993)
Nottingham Forest 0–3 Norwich City
(17 March 1993)
Queens Park Rangers 0–3 Blackburn Rovers
(24 March 1993)
Manchester City 2–5 Everton
(8 May 1993)
Highest scoringOldham Athletic 5–3 Nottingham Forest
(22 August 1992)
Blackburn Rovers 7–1 Norwich City
(3 October 1992)
Oldham Athletic 6–2 Wimbledon
(3 April 1993)
Everton 3–5 Queens Park Rangers
(12 April 1993)
Liverpool 6–2 Tottenham Hotspur
(8 May 1993)
Longest winning run7 games[1]
Manchester United
Sheffield Wednesday
Longest unbeaten run11 games[1]
Manchester United
Longest winless run13 games[1]
Ipswich Town
Longest losing run6 games[1]
Nottingham Forest
Highest attendance44,619
Liverpool v Everton
(20 March 1993)
Lowest attendance3,039
Wimbledon v Everton
(26 January 1993)

Contents

OverviewEdit

BackgroundEdit

In May 1992, the breakaway league signed a broadcasting rights contract with Sky and the BBC valued at £304 million, the largest such agreement in the history of British sport.[2] The league's executive committee was unable, however, to secure title sponsorship for the new competition after eight clubs blocked a proposed £13 million deal with brewers Bass.[3] Nonetheless, clubs began to utilise their dramatically increased wealth to fund a series of high-profile transfers.[4]

Although the idea of a super league had been mentioned by football's governing bodies and evaluated by the media since the mid 1980s, plans for a new Premier League of 22 clubs were first unveiled by the Football Association in October 1990, and included in the Football Association's Blueprint for the Future of Football, published in June 1991.[5] The majority of First Division clubs, particularly long-established top clubs including Arsenal and Manchester United, were in favour of a breakaway from the Football League, although Football League president Bill Fox criticised the planned Premier League as an attempt by the Football Association to "hijack" the First Division.

Shortly before the season began, newly promoted Blackburn Rovers signed Southampton's 21-year-old England international striker Alan Shearer for a new British record fee variously reported as £3.3 million,[6] £3.4 million,[7] or £3.6 million.[8] Several other players moved for fees of £2 million or more, including Arsenal's David Rocastle, who joined Leeds United,[9] Dean Saunders, who moved from Liverpool to Aston Villa,[10] and Teddy Sheringham, who left Nottingham Forest for Tottenham Hotspur.[11]

The structure of the new league was identical to that of the previous season's Football League First Division, comprising 22 teams, with each playing the other 21 twice for a total of 42 matches. Ipswich Town and Middlesbrough had been promoted from the old Second Division as champions and runners-up respectively, and Blackburn Rovers took the third promotion place after winning the 1991–92 Second Division playoff.[12]

Season summaryEdit

The first Premier League title went to Manchester United, the club's first title for 26 years. Their title was achieved with a 10-point lead over runners-up Aston Villa. Norwich City led the table for much of the season, but their challenge faded in the final weeks of the season and were out of contention three games before the season was over after they lost 3–1 to Ipswich Town. Norwich did however finish in third place, achieving European qualification in Mike Walker's debut season as manager. Blackburn, in the top division for the first time in almost 30 years, finished in fourth place, also taking the lead of the league early in the season but suffering a shortage of goals after 16-goal Alan Shearer was injured just after Christmas. The title race after Christmas was largely between the clubs who finished in the top four after early challenges from the likes of Arsenal, Coventry City, and QPR were not sustained.

Nottingham Forest's league form had suffered through the sale of key players like Des Walker and Teddy Sheringham, and they were bottom of the Premier League for much of the 1992–93 season. Their relegation was confirmed in early May when they lost to Sheffield United, and manager Brian Clough announced his retirement after 18 years as manager, which had yielded one league title, two European Cups and four League Cups. Next to go were newly promoted Middlesbrough, who fell from mid-table at Christmas to go down in second from bottom place. Last to go down were Crystal Palace, who failed to win their final game of the season which would have instead consigned Oldham Athletic to the final relegation place.[13]

Title holders Leeds United finished 17th, which became one of the worst-ever title defences in the English top flight.[14]

The top scorer in the new Premier League was Teddy Sheringham, who found the net for Nottingham Forest in their opening game of the season before being sold to Tottenham Hotspur, scoring a further 21 goals for the North London side in the league. PFA Player of the Year was Paul McGrath of Aston Villa. FWA Player of the Year was Chris Waddle, who helped Sheffield Wednesday achieve runners-up spot in both of the cups after ending his three-year spell in France. PFA Young Player of the Year was Ryan Giggs, who won the award for the second year running, and also picked up a league title medal with Manchester United.

TeamsEdit

Twenty-two teams competed in the league – the top nineteen teams from the First Division and the three teams promoted from the Second Division. The promoted teams were Ipswich Town, Middlesbrough and Blackburn Rovers, returning to the top flight after an absence of six, three and twenty-six years respectively. They replaced Luton Town, Notts County and West Ham United, ending their top flight spells of ten, one and eleven years respectively.

Stadiums and locationsEdit

Greater London Premier League football clubs
Greater Manchester Premier League football clubs
Team Location Stadium Capacity
Arsenal London (Highbury) Arsenal Stadium 38,419
Aston Villa Birmingham Villa Park 39,399
Blackburn Rovers Blackburn Ewood Park 31,367
Chelsea London (Fulham) Stamford Bridge 36,000
Coventry City Coventry Highfield Road 23,489
Crystal Palace London (Selhurst) Selhurst Park 26,309
Everton Liverpool (Walton) Goodison Park 40,157
Ipswich Town Ipswich Portman Road 30,300
Leeds United Leeds Elland Road 40,204
Liverpool Liverpool (Anfield) Anfield 42,730
Manchester City Manchester Maine Road 35,150
Manchester United Old Trafford Old Trafford 55,314
Middlesbrough Middlesbrough Ayresome Park 26,667
Norwich City Norwich Carrow Road 27,010
Nottingham Forest West Bridgford City Ground 30,539
Oldham Athletic Oldham Boundary Park 13,512
Queens Park Rangers London (Shepherd's Bush) Loftus Road 18,439
Sheffield United Sheffield (Highfield) Bramall Lane 32,702
Sheffield Wednesday Sheffield (Owlerton) Hillsborough Stadium 39,859
Southampton Southampton The Dell 15,200
Tottenham Hotspur London (Tottenham) White Hart Lane 36,230
Wimbledon London (Wimbledon) Selhurst Park[a] 26,309
  1. ^ Due to Wimbledon lacking a home stadium, they played their home games at Selhurst Park, which is the home stadium of Crystal Palace.

Personnel and kitsEdit

(as of 9 May 1993)

Team Manager Captain Kit manufacturer Shirt sponsor
Arsenal   George Graham   Tony Adams Adidas JVC
Aston Villa   Ron Atkinson   Kevin Richardson Umbro Mita Copiers
Blackburn Rovers   Kenny Dalglish   Tim Sherwood Asics McEwan's Lager
Chelsea   David Webb (caretaker)   Andy Townsend Umbro Commodore International
Coventry City   Bobby Gould   Brian Borrows Ribero Peugeot
Crystal Palace   Steve Coppell   Geoff Thomas Bukta (until December)
Ribero (from December)
Tulip Computers NV
Everton   Howard Kendall   Dave Watson Umbro NEC
Ipswich Town   John Lyall   John Wark Umbro Fisons
Leeds United   Howard Wilkinson   Gordon Strachan Admiral Admiral
Liverpool   Graeme Souness   Mark Wright Adidas Carlsberg
Manchester City   Peter Reid   Terry Phelan Umbro Brother Industries
Manchester United   Alex Ferguson   Bryan Robson Umbro Sharp
Middlesbrough   Lennie Lawrence   Alan Kernaghan Admiral Imperial Chemical Industries
Norwich City   Mike Walker   Ian Butterworth Ribero Norwich and Peterborough
Nottingham Forest   Brian Clough   Stuart Pearce Umbro Shipstones (home), Labatts (away)
Oldham Athletic   Joe Royle   Mike Milligan Umbro JD Sports
Queens Park Rangers   Gerry Francis   Alan McDonald Brooks Running Classic FM
Sheffield United   Dave Bassett   Brian Gayle Umbro Laver
Sheffield Wednesday   Trevor Francis   Nigel Pearson Umbro Sanderson
Southampton   Ian Branfoot   Matt Le Tissier Admiral Draper Tools
Tottenham Hotspur   Doug Livermore
  Ray Clemence
  Gary Mabbutt Umbro Holsten
Wimbledon   Joe Kinnear   John Scales Admiral No sponsor

Managerial changesEdit

Team Outgoing manager Manner of departure Date of vacancy Position in table Incoming manager Date of appointment
Norwich City   David Williams End of caretaker spell 1 May 1992 Pre-season   Mike Walker 1 June 1992
Coventry City   Don Howe 14 May 1992   Bobby Gould 6 June 1992
Tottenham Hotspur   Peter Shreeves Sacked 19 May 1992   Doug Livermore
  Ray Clemence
19 May 1992
Chelsea   Ian Porterfield 15 February 1993 12th   David Webb 15 February 1993

League tableEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Manchester United (C) 42 24 12 6 67 31 +36 84 Qualification for the Champions League first round
2 Aston Villa 42 21 11 10 57 40 +17 74 Qualification for the UEFA Cup first round[a]
3 Norwich City 42 21 9 12 61 65 −4 72
4 Blackburn Rovers 42 20 11 11 68 46 +22 71
5 Queens Park Rangers 42 17 12 13 63 55 +8 63
6 Liverpool 42 16 11 15 62 55 +7 59
7 Sheffield Wednesday 42 15 14 13 55 51 +4 59
8 Tottenham Hotspur 42 16 11 15 60 66 −6 59
9 Manchester City 42 15 12 15 56 51 +5 57
10 Arsenal 42 15 11 16 40 38 +2 56 Qualification for the Cup Winners' Cup first round[b]
11 Chelsea 42 14 14 14 51 54 −3 56
12 Wimbledon 42 14 12 16 56 55 +1 54
13 Everton 42 15 8 19 53 55 −2 53
14 Sheffield United 42 14 10 18 54 53 +1 52
15 Coventry City 42 13 13 16 52 57 −5 52
16 Ipswich Town 42 12 16 14 50 55 −5 52
17 Leeds United 42 12 15 15 57 62 −5 51
18 Southampton 42 13 11 18 54 61 −7 50
19 Oldham Athletic 42 13 10 19 63 74 −11 49
20 Crystal Palace (R) 42 11 16 15 48 61 −13 49 Relegation to the Football League First Division
21 Middlesbrough (R) 42 11 11 20 54 75 −21 44
22 Nottingham Forest (R) 42 10 10 22 41 62 −21 40
Source: Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ Since Arsenal qualified for UEFA Cup as League Cup winners, the UEFA Cup berth reverted to the league and was awarded to Norwich City. England was considered for an extra slot for the UEFA Cup after the 1993 Polish football scandal, but another one was given to Scotland, and it seemed excessive to give both two slots to Great Britain, and the extra place was reverted to Hungary.
  2. ^ Arsenal qualified by winning the FA Cup, thus defaulted their UEFA Cup spot.

ResultsEdit

Home \ Away ARS AST BLB CHE COV CRY EVE IPS LEE LIV MCI MUN MID NWC NOT OLD QPR SHU SHW SOU TOT WDN
Arsenal 0–1 0–1 2–1 3–0 3–0 2–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 1–0 0–1 1–1 2–4 1–1 2–0 0–0 1–1 2–1 4–3 1–3 0–1
Aston Villa 1–0 0–0 1–3 0–0 3–0 2–1 2–0 1–1 4–2 3–1 1–0 5–1 2–3 2–1 0–1 2–0 3–1 2–0 1–1 0–0 1–0
Blackburn Rovers 1–0 3–0 2–0 2–5 1–2 2–3 2–1 3–1 4–1 1–0 0–0 1–1 7–1 4–1 2–0 1–0 1–0 1–0 0–0 0–2 0–0
Chelsea 1–0 0–1 0–0 2–1 3–1 2–1 2–1 1–0 0–0 2–4 1–1 4–0 2–3 0–0 1–1 1–0 1–2 0–2 1–1 1–1 4–2
Coventry City 0–2 3–0 0–2 1–2 2–2 0–1 2–2 3–3 5–1 2–3 0–1 2–1 1–1 0–1 3–0 0–1 1–3 1–0 2–0 1–0 0–2
Crystal Palace 1–2 1–0 3–3 1–1 0–0 0–2 3–1 1–0 1–1 0–0 0–2 4–1 1–2 1–1 2–2 1–1 2–0 1–1 1–2 1–3 2–0
Everton 0–0 1–0 2–1 0–1 1–1 0–2 3–0 2–0 2–1 1–3 0–2 2–2 0–1 3–0 2–2 3–5 0–2 1–1 2–1 1–2 0–0
Ipswich Town 1–2 1–1 2–1 1–1 0–0 2–2 1–0 4–2 2–2 3–1 2–1 0–1 3–1 2–1 1–2 1–1 0–0 0–1 0–0 1–1 2–1
Leeds United 3–0 1–1 5–2 1–1 2–2 0–0 2–0 1–0 2–2 1–0 0–0 3–0 0–0 1–4 2–0 1–1 3–1 3–1 2–1 5–0 2–1
Liverpool 0–2 1–2 2–1 2–1 4–0 5–0 1–0 0–0 2–0 1–1 1–2 4–1 4–1 0–0 1–0 1–0 2–1 1–0 1–1 6–2 2–3
Manchester City 0–1 1–1 3–2 0–1 1–0 0–0 2–5 3–1 4–0 1–1 1–1 0–1 3–1 2–2 3–3 1–1 2–0 1–2 1–0 0–1 1–1
Manchester United 0–0 1–1 3–1 3–0 5–0 1–0 0–3 1–1 2–0 2–2 2–1 3–0 1–0 2–0 3–0 0–0 2–1 2–1 2–1 4–1 0–1
Middlesbrough 1–0 2–3 3–2 0–0 0–2 0–1 1–2 2–2 4–1 1–2 2–0 1–1 3–3 1–2 2–3 0–1 2–0 1–1 2–1 3–0 2–0
Norwich City 1–1 1–0 0–0 2–1 1–1 4–2 1–1 0–2 4–2 1–0 2–1 1–3 1–1 3–1 1–0 2–1 2–1 1–0 1–0 0–0 2–1
Nottingham Forest 0–1 0–1 1–3 3–0 1–1 1–1 0–1 0–1 1–1 1–0 0–2 0–2 1–0 0–3 2–0 1–0 0–2 1–2 1–2 2–1 1–1
Oldham Athletic 0–1 1–1 0–1 3–1 0–1 1–1 1–0 4–2 2–2 3–2 0–1 1–0 4–1 2–3 5–3 2–2 1–1 1–1 4–3 2–1 6–2
Queens Park Rangers 0–0 2–1 0–3 1–1 2–0 1–3 4–2 0–0 2–1 0–1 1–1 1–3 3–3 3–1 4–3 3–2 3–2 3–1 3–1 4–1 1–2
Sheffield United 1–1 0–2 1–3 4–2 1–1 0–1 1–0 3–0 2–1 1–0 1–1 2–1 2–0 0–1 0–0 2–0 1–2 1–1 2–0 6–0 2–2
Sheffield Wednesday 1–0 1–2 0–0 3–3 1–2 2–1 3–1 1–1 1–1 1–1 0–3 3–3 2–3 1–0 2–0 2–1 1–0 1–1 5–2 2–0 1–1
Southampton 2–0 2–0 1–1 1–0 2–2 1–0 0–0 4–3 1–1 2–1 0–1 0–1 2–1 3–0 1–2 1–0 1–2 3–2 1–2 0–0 2–2
Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 0–0 1–2 1–2 0–2 2–2 2–1 0–2 4–0 2–0 3–1 1–1 2–2 5–1 2–1 4–1 3–2 2–0 0–2 4–2 1–1
Wimbledon 3–2 2–3 1–1 0–0 1–2 4–0 1–3 0–1 1–0 2–0 0–1 1–2 2–0 3–0 1–0 5–2 0–2 2–0 1–1 1–2 1–1
Source:[citation needed]
Colours: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Season statisticsEdit

ScoringEdit

Top scorersEdit

 
Teddy Sheringham was the top scorer in the inaugural Premier League season.

The top goalscorer in the Premier League's inaugural season was Teddy Sheringham, who scored one goal for Nottingham Forest before his early-season transfer followed by 21 for Tottenham Hotspur for a total of 22.[15] Alan Shearer had scored 16 goals by Christmas before suffering a season-ending injury.

Rank Player Club Goals[16]
1   Teddy Sheringham Nottingham Forest
Tottenham Hotspur
22
2   Les Ferdinand Queens Park Rangers 20
3   Dean Holdsworth Wimbledon 19
4   Micky Quinn Coventry City 17
5   Alan Shearer Blackburn Rovers 16
  David White Manchester City 16
7   Chris Armstrong Crystal Palace 15
  Eric Cantona Leeds United
Manchester United
15
  Brian Deane Sheffield United 15
  Mark Hughes Manchester United 15
  Matt Le Tissier Southampton 15
  Mark Robins Norwich City 15
  Ian Wright Arsenal 15

Hat-tricksEdit

 
Eric Cantona scored the first ever Premier League hat-trick, in a 5–0 win over Tottenham Hotspur. In addition, he also assisted 16 goals for Leeds United and Manchester United over the season.
Player For Against Result Date Ref
  Eric Cantona Leeds United Tottenham Hotspur 5–0 (H) 25 August 1992 [17]
  Mark Robins Norwich City Oldham Athletic 3–2 (A) 8 November 1992 [18]
  John Hendrie Middlesbrough Blackburn Rovers 3–2 (H) 5 December 1992 [19]
  Andy Sinton Queens Park Rangers Everton 4–2 (H) 28 December 1992 [20]
  Brian Deane Sheffield United Ipswich Town 3–0 (H) 17 January 1993 [21]
  Teddy Sheringham Tottenham Hotspur Leeds United 4–0 (H) 22 February 1993 [22]
  Gordon Strachan Leeds United Blackburn Rovers 5–2 (H) 10 April 1993 [23]
  Les Ferdinand Queens Park Rangers Nottingham Forest 4–3 (H) 10 April 1993 [24]
  Chris Bart-Williams Sheffield Wednesday Southampton 5–2 (H) 12 April 1993 [25]
  Les Ferdinand Queens Park Rangers Everton 5–3 (A) 12 April 1993 [26]
  Chris Sutton Norwich City Leeds United 4–2 (H) 14 April 1993 [27]
  Mark Walters Liverpool Coventry City 4–0 (H) 17 April 1993 [28]
  Rod Wallace Leeds United Coventry City 3–3 (A) 8 May 1993 [29]
  Matt Le Tissier Southampton Oldham Athletic 3–4 (A) 8 May 1993 [30]
Note: (H) – Home; (A) – Away

Top assistsEdit

Rank Player Club Assists[31]
1   Eric Cantona Leeds United
Manchester United
16
2   Darren Anderton Tottenham Hotspur 11
  Matt Le Tissier Southampton
  Niall Quinn Manchester City
5   Brian Deane Sheffield United 10
  Jason Wilcox Blackburn Rovers
7   Jason Dozzell Ipswich Town 9
  Rick Holden Manchester City
  Lee Sharpe Manchester United
  Teddy Sheringham Tottenham Hotspur
  Andy Sinton Queens Park Rangers
  Ian Woan Nottingham Forest

Individual awardsEdit

The Professional Footballers' Association (PFA) presented its annual Players' Player of the Year award to Paul McGrath, a veteran central defender who contributed to Aston Villa's second-place finish in the Premier League. Manchester United's Paul Ince came second and Blackburn's Alan Shearer third.[32] The Young Player of the Year award was given to Ryan Giggs, the 19-year-old Manchester United left winger who had also won the award in the previous season. Giggs, who finished ahead of Tottenham's Nick Barmby and Nottingham Forest's Roy Keane, became the first player to win the award more than once.[32]

The Football Writers' Association (the FWA) chose Chris Waddle as its Footballer of the Year.[33] Waddle, who made his return to English football with Sheffield Wednesday after three years in France with Olympique Marseille, became the first Wednesday player to win the award in its 45-year history. McGrath and Giggs finished in second and joint third place respectively in the writers' poll.[34]

The PFA also selected eleven players to form its Team of the Year. The team included four Manchester United players (Giggs, Ince, Peter Schmeichel and Gary Pallister) and two from Leeds United (Tony Dorigo and Gary Speed). The other members of the team were McGrath, Keane, Shearer, David Bardsley (Queens Park Rangers) and Ian Wright (Arsenal).[32] The Manager of the Year award, chosen by a panel representing football's governing body, the media, and fans, was given to Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson.[35] The newly formed League Managers Association also presented its own Manager of the Year award for the first time, specifically designed to recognise "the manager who made best use of the resources available to him". This award went to Dave Bassett of Sheffield United.[35]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "English Premier League 1992–93". statto.com. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  2. ^ Ball, Peter (19 May 1992). "Premier League kicks off with £304m TV deal". The Times. Retrieved 16 January 2009.
  3. ^ Signy, Dennis (18 September 1992). "Clubs ask Parry to resolve dispute over sponsorship". The Times. Retrieved 16 January 2009.
  4. ^ Dobson, Stephen; John A. Goddard (2001). The Economics of Football. Cambridge University Press. p. 377. ISBN 0-521-66158-7.
  5. ^ "How the FA betrayed their own game". 14 November 2004 – via The Guardian.
  6. ^ "The Kenny Dalglish file". BBC. 27 August 1998. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  7. ^ "Shearer to move for £3.4 million". The Times. 27 July 1992. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  8. ^ Kannas, Sofia (22 July 2004). "Can money buy success?". The Football Association. Archived from the original on 1 March 2009. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  9. ^ Ross, Ian (24 July 1992). "Rocastle completes transfer to Leeds". The Times. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  10. ^ White, Clive (11 September 1992). "Saunders signs for Villa after compromise deal". The Times. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  11. ^ Signy, Dennis (28 August 1992). "Sheringham joins Spurs in £2.1m deal". The Times. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  12. ^ "England 1991/1992". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. 5 June 2004. Archived from the original on 1 February 2009. Retrieved 15 January 2009.
  13. ^ "Oldham held Chelsea, Sheffield United shocked Manchester United and there were no foreign managers… a look back at the first round of Premier League games in 1992". Daily Mail. 12 August 2016. Retrieved 12 August 2016.
  14. ^ "The 10 worst English top-flight title defences ever". FourFourTwo. Haymarket. 21 November 2016. Retrieved 28 August 2017.
  15. ^ Bateson, Bill; Albert Sewell (1993). News of the World Football Annual 1993–1994. Invincible Press. p. 56. ISBN 0-85543-208-X.
  16. ^ "Barclays Premier League Statistics". Premier League. Premier League. Archived from the original on 3 December 2010. Retrieved 7 November 2010.
  17. ^ Andrews, Phil (26 August 1992). "Football: Cantona hits hat-trick to crush Spurs". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  18. ^ "Oldham 2–3 Norwich". Sky Sports. 9 November 1992. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  19. ^ Dobson, Frank (6 December 1992). "Football: Rovers rocked by Hendrie hat-trick". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  20. ^ Fox, Norman (29 December 1992). "Football: Everton's day of dismissals". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  21. ^ Andrews, Phil (16 January 1993). "Football: Deane gets about Town". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  22. ^ Haylett, Trevor (22 February 1993). "Football: Barmby poses a national problem". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  23. ^ Edworthy, Niall (11 April 1993). "Football: Strachan inspires". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  24. ^ Elliott, Sam (11 April 1993). "Football: Forest full of goals and holes". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  25. ^ Andrews, Phil (13 April 1993). "Football: Wednesday's strength in depth". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  26. ^ "Everton 3–5 QPR". Sky Sports. 12 April 1993. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  27. ^ Haylett, Trevor (15 April 1993). "Football: Sutton does the trick to inspire Norwich: Champions still without an away win as Canaries rediscover their scoring touch". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  28. ^ Brown, Geoff (18 April 1993). "Round-Up: Walsh stays ahead". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  29. ^ Brown, Geoff (9 May 1993). "Football: Lions fans dig up Den". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  30. ^ Slot, Owen (9 May 1993). "Football: Oldham triumph against the odds: Royle's men produce the performance to ensure survival as Coppell's worst fears come true". The Independent. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  31. ^ "Statistical Leaders – 1993". Premier League. Archived from the original on 24 June 2017. Retrieved 5 May 2018.
  32. ^ a b c "McGrath wins PFA award". The Times. 29 March 1993. Retrieved 14 January 2009.
  33. ^ "England – Players Awards". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. 4 October 2007. Archived from the original on 11 February 2009. Retrieved 14 January 2009.
  34. ^ "Waddle receives award". The Times. 3 May 1993. Retrieved 14 January 2009.
  35. ^ a b Barnes, Stuart (2007). News of the World Football Annual 2007–2008. HarperSport. p. 62. ISBN 0-00-725555-1.

External linksEdit