Open main menu

Paleontology or palaeontology is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils.[1] This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 1941.

List of years in paleontology (table)
In science
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944

ArthropodsEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Type Location Notes Images

Electresia[2]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Kuznetsov

Holocene

  Tanzania

A Tortricidae moth in copal.
The type species is E. zalesskii.

Proraphidia[3]

Gen et sp nov

Valid

Martynova

Jurassic

  Kazakhstan

P. turkestanica named as type species

ConodontsEdit

DinosaursEdit

  • Psittacosaurus gastroliths documented.[5]

Newly named dinosaursEdit

Data coutersy of George Olshevky's dinosaur genera list.[6]

Name Status Authors Location Notes Images
Lufengosaurus[7] Valid taxon
  • Yang Z. J. (as Young C. C.)
Saurophagus[8] Preoccupied

Stovall vide:

  • Ray, 1941

Now Saurophaganax.

"Succinodon"[9] Original fossil was petrified wood with mollusc borings that was misidentified as a jaw bone with tooth sockets.

Friedrich von Huene

PlesiosaursEdit

New taxaEdit

Name Status Authors Location Notes Images

Aristonectes

Valid

Cabrera

A Long-Necked Plesiosaur.

SynapsidsEdit

Non-mammalianEdit

Name Status Authors Age Location Notes Images

Bayloria

Junior Synonim

Synonim of Captorhinus.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gini-Newman, Garfield; Graham, Elizabeth (2001). Echoes from the past: world history to the 16th century. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. ISBN 9780070887398. OCLC 46769716.
  2. ^ Maria Heikkilä; John W. Brown; Joaquin Baixeras; Wolfram Mey; Mikhail V. Kozlov (2018). "Re-examining the rare and the lost: a review of fossil Tortricidae (Lepidoptera)". Zootaxa. 4394 (1): 41–60. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4394.1.2. PMID 29690381.
  3. ^ Jepson, J.E.; Jarzembowski, E.A. (2008). "Two new species of snakefly (Insecta:Raphidioptera) from the Lower Cretaceous of England and Spain with a review of other fossil raphidiopterans from the Jurassic/Cretaceous transition" (PDF). Alavesia. 2: 193–201. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-18.
  4. ^ a b c d e New and Little Known Carboniferous Conodont Genera. E. B. Branson and M. G. Mehl, Journal of Paleontology, Vol. 15, No. 2 (Mar., 1941), pages 97-106 (Stable URL, retrieved 29 April 2015)
  5. ^ Brown (1941). Sanders, Manley, and Carpenter (2001), "Table 12.1" page 167.
  6. ^ Olshevsky, George. "Dinogeorge's Dinosaur Genera List". Retrieved 2008-08-07.
  7. ^ Young, C.-C. 1941. A complete osteology of Lufengosaurus huenei Young (gen. et sp. nov.) from Lufeng, Yunnan, China. Paleontol Sinica (N.S.) Ser. C7: pp. 1-53.
  8. ^ Stovall vide Ray, G.E. 1941. Big for his day. Nat. Hist. 48: pp. 36-39.
  9. ^ Huene, F. von. 1941. Die Tetrapoden-Fahrten im toskanischen Verrucano und ihre Bedeutung. N. Jb. Mineral. Geol. Palaeontol. 1941B: pp. 1-34.
  • Brown, B. 1941. The last dinosaurs. – Natural History 48: 290–295.
  • Sanders F, Manley K, Carpenter K. Gastroliths from the Lower Cretaceous sauropod Cedarosaurus weiskopfae. In: Tanke D.H, Carpenter K, editors. Mesozoic vertebrate life: new research inspired by the paleontology of Philip J. Currie. Indiana University Press; Bloomington, IN: 2001. pp. 166–180.