1933 in paleontology

Paleontology or palaeontology is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils.[1] This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 1933.

List of years in paleontology (table)
In science
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936

PlantsEdit

AngiospermsEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

lodes multireticiilata[2]

Sp nov

valid

Reid & Chandler

Ypresian

London Clay

  UK
  England

An icacinaceous species.

Langtonia[2]

Gen et sp nov

valid

Reid & Chandler

Ypresian

London Clay

  UK
  England

A tupelo relative,
type species L. bisulcata.

Palaeophytocrene[2]

Gen et sp nov

valid

Reid & Chandler

Ypresian

London Clay

  UK
  England

An icacinaceous relative.
Type species P. foveolata

Tinomiscoidea[2]

Gen et sp nov

valid

Reid & Chandler

Ypresian

London Clay

  UK
  England

A moon seed relative.
Type species T. scaphiformis

ArthropodsEdit

Newly named insectsEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Electrostephanus brevicornis[3]

Sp nov

valid

Brues

Lutetian

Baltic Amber

A stephanid wasp

Electrostephanus petiolatus[3]

Sp nov

valid

Brues

Lutetian

Baltic Amber

A stephanid wasp,
Electrostephanus type species

Electrostephanus tridentatus[3]

Sp nov

jr synonym

Brues

Lutetian

Baltic Amber

A stephanid wasp,
now Denaeostephanus tridentatus

ConodontsEdit

Newly named conodontsEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Wurmiella excavata

Sp nov

valid

Mehl and Branson

420 Millions of years ago

  USA
  Nevada

Idiognathoides[4]

Gen nov

valid

Harris and Hollingsworth

Pennsylvanian

Oklahoma

Cavusgnathus[4]

Gen nov

valid

Harris and Hollingsworth

Pennsylvanian

Oklahoma

ArchosauromorphsEdit

  • Barnum Brown prospected the Two Medicine Formation, but found nothing significant.[5]
  • Lull published a monograph where he discusses AMNH 5244, a ceratopsian braincase.[6]

Newly named dinosaursEdit

Data courtesy of George Olshevsky's dinosaur genera list.[7]

Name Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images
Alectrosaurus[8] Valid taxon

late Campanian-early Maastrichtian

Iren Dabasu Formation

A tyrannosauroid.

Austrosaurus[9]

Valid taxon

late Albian-early Cenomanian

Allaru Formation

A titanosauriform.

Bactrosaurus[8] Valid taxon

late Campanian-early Maastrichtian

Iren Dabasu Formation

A hadrosauroid.

Coeluroides[10] Nomen dubium

late Maastrichtian

Lameta Formation

An Abelisaur.

Compsosuchus[10] Valid taxon

late Maastrichtian

Lameta Formation

A noasaurid.

Dryptosauroides[10] Nomen dubium

late Maastrichtian

Lameta Formation

A noasaurid.

Indosaurus[10] Valid taxon

late Maastrichtian

Lameta Formation

An abelisaurid.

Indosuchus[10] Valid taxon

late Maastrichtian

Lameta Formation

An abelisaurid.

Jubbulpuria[10] Nomen dubium

late Maastrichtian

Lameta Formation

A noasaurid.

Laevisuchus[10] Nomen dubium

late Maastrichtian

Lameta Formation

A noasaurid.

Mongolosaurus[11] Nomen dubium

Lower Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian)

On Gong Formation

A titanosaur.

Ornithomimoides[10] Nomen dubium

late Maastrichtian

Lameta Formation

A noasaurid.

Pinacosaurus[11] Valid taxon

middle-late Campanian

Djadochta Formation

An ankylosaurid.

SynapsidsEdit

Non-mammalianEdit

Name Status Authors Discovery year Age Unit Location Notes Images

Mucrotherium

Valid

Uniserium

Valid

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Gini-Newman, Garfield; Graham, Elizabeth (2001). Echoes from the past: world history to the 16th century. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. ISBN 9780070887398. OCLC 46769716.
  2. ^ a b c d Manchester, S.R. (1994). "Fruits and Seeds of the Middle Eocene Nut Beds Flora, Clarno Formation, Oregon". Palaeontographica Americana. 58: 30–31.
  3. ^ a b c Engel, M.S.; Ortega-Blanco, J. (2008). "The fossil crown wasp Electrostephanus petiolatus Brues in Baltic Amber (Hymenoptera, Stephanidae): designation of a neotype, revised classification, and a key to amber Stephanidae". ZooKeys (4): 55–64. doi:10.3897/zookeys.4.49.
  4. ^ a b New Pennsylvanian conodonts from Oklahoma. RW Harris and RV Hollingsworth, American Journal of Science, March 1933, series 5, volume 25, no. 147, pages 193-204, doi:10.2475/ajs.s5-25.147.193
  5. ^ "Previous Work," Trexler (2001); page 300.
  6. ^ "Introduction," Makovicky (2001); page 244.
  7. ^ Olshevsky, George. "Dinogeorge's Dinosaur Genera List". Retrieved 2008-08-07.
  8. ^ a b Gilmore, C.W. 1933. On the dinosaurian fauna of the Iren Dabasu Formation. Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. 67: PP. 23-78.
  9. ^ Longman, H.A. 1933. A new dinosaur from the Queensland Cretaceous. Mem. Queensland Mus. 10: pp. 131-144.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h Huene, F. von, and C.A. Matley. 1933. The Cretaceous saurischia and ornithischia of the Central Provinces of India. Mem. Geol. Survey India Pabeontol. Indica 21: pp. 1-72.
  11. ^ a b Gilmore, C.W. 1933. Two new dinosaurian reptiles from Mongolia with notes on some fragmentary specimens. Amer. Mus. Novitates 679: pp. 1-20

ReferencesEdit

  • Makovicky, P. J., 2001, A Montanoceratops cerorhynchus (Dinosauria: Ceratopsia) braincase from the Horseshoe Canyon Formation of Alberta: In: Mesozoic Vertebrate Life, edited by Tanke, D. H., and Carpenter, K., Indiana University Press, pp. 243–262.
  • Trexler, D., 2001, Two Medicine Formation, Montana: geology and fauna: In: Mesozoic Vertebrate Life, edited by Tanke, D. H., and Carpenter, K., Indiana University Press, pp. 298–309.