Zheng Haixia

Zheng Haixia (simplified Chinese: 郑海霞; traditional Chinese: 鄭海霞; pinyin: Zhèng Hǎixiá; born March 7, 1967) is a Chinese retired professional women's basketball player for the China women's national basketball team and the Women's National Basketball Association.

Zheng Haixia
Personal information
Born (1967-03-07) March 7, 1967 (age 53)
Shangqiu, Henan, China
NationalityChinese
Listed height6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Career information
WNBA draft1997 / Round: 2 / Pick: 16th overall
Selected by the Los Angeles Sparks
Playing career1983–1998
PositionCenter
Career history
1997–1998Los Angeles Sparks

International careerEdit

In 1983, Haixia made her debut at the Basketball World Championship and finished 3rd. The following year, she and her teammates finished 1st in the Asian Junior Basketball Championship and 3rd in the 23rd Olympic Games.

In 1986, she led the Chinese team to fifth in the 10th World Championship, 1st in the Asian Games, and 2nd in the World Championship.

In 1992, she inspired her teammates to win the silver in the Barcelona Olympics. The following year, she won the East Asian Games, the World University Games and National Games.

In 1994, she claimed the titles in the Asian Championship and ranked 2nd in the World Championship, being named MVP of the event by averaging 26.4 points, 13.1 rebounds and shooting 83.5% from the field.[1]

One year later, she and her teammates retained their title in the 16th Asian Championship.

In 1996, she made her fourth Olympic appearance in Atlanta, Georgia, averaging 18.1 points, 9 rebounds. One year later, she won the 8th National Games with the PLA team.

WNBA careerEdit

In 1997 she retired from the Chinese national team and went to play with the Los Angeles Sparks in the WNBA in the United States.[2] At the end of 1998, she returned to China and began to coach the PLA women's team. She is currently a coach in China.

In 1997 Haixia received the Kim Perrot Sportsmanship Award becoming the first Asian woman as well as international player to win any award in the WNBA. She led the WNBA in field goal percentage at .618.

Career statisticsEdit

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game  RPG  Rebounds per game
 APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game  BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game
 TO  Turnovers per game  FG%  Field-goal percentage  3P%  3-point field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage
 Bold  Career high ° League leader

WNBAEdit

Career totalsEdit

Year Team G GS MIN FGM FGA FTM FTA 3PTM 3PTA REB AST STL TO BLK PTS
1997 LA 28 21 557 110 178 39 59 0 0 123 17 11 46 20 259
1998 LA 6 2 98 20 32 5 7 0 0 26 3 0 6 1 45
Totals 34 23 655 130 210 44 66 0 0 149 20 11 52 21 304

Career averagesEdit

Year Team MIN FG% FT% 3PT% RPG APG SPG TO BPG PPG
1997 LA 19.9 .618 .661 .000 4.4 0.6 0.4 1.6 0.7 9.3
1998 LA 16.3 .625 .714 .000 4.3 0.5 0.0 1.0 0.2 7.5
Totals 19.3 .619 .667 .000 4.4 0.6 0.3 1.5 0.6 8.9

Personal lifeEdit

She started to practice basketball at the age of 12 and was selected by the Wuhan Army club team one year later. In 1983, she entered the national team. She married Xu Qinghua in Beijing on June 19, 2010.[3][4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The women's sports encyclopedia. Markel, Robert., Waggoner, Susan., Smith, Marcella (Marcella Ann) (1st ed.). New York: H. Holt. 1997. p. 15. ISBN 0-8050-4494-9. OCLC 36640667.CS1 maint: others (link)
  2. ^ Friend, Tom (1997-06-19). "L.A. Imports Its Very Own Shaq". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-04-23.
  3. ^ "China's female Yao weds".
  4. ^ "Haixia Zheng: Whatever Happened to the 1st Chinese WNBA Player?". stuarte. 2014-08-20. Retrieved 2020-04-23.

External linksEdit