The New York Liberty are an American professional basketball team based in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The Liberty compete in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) as part of the league's Eastern Conference. The team was founded in 1997 and is one of the eight original franchises of the league. The team is owned by Joe Tsai and Clara Wu Tsai, the majority owners of the Brooklyn Nets. The team's home games are played at Barclays Center.

New York Liberty
2024 New York Liberty season
New York Liberty logo
ConferenceEastern
LeaguesWNBA
Founded1997
HistoryNew York Liberty
1997–present
ArenaBarclays Center
LocationBrooklyn, New York
Team colorsSeafoam green, black, white[1][2]
     
CEOKeia Clarke
General managerJonathan Kolb
Head coachSandy Brondello
Assistant(s)Olaf Lange
Roneeka Hodges
Zach O'Brien
OwnershipJoseph Tsai & Clara Wu Tsai
Championships0
Conference titles5 (1997, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2023)
Commissioner's Cup titles1 (2023)
Websiteliberty.wnba.com
Heroine jersey
Team colours
Heroine
Explorer jersey
Team colours
Explorer
Rebel jersey
Team colours
Rebel

The Liberty have qualified for the WNBA Playoffs in seventeen of its twenty-six years. The franchise has been home to many well-known players such as Teresa Weatherspoon, Rebecca Lobo, Becky Hammon, Leilani Mitchell, Essence Carson, Cappie Pondexter, Tina Charles, the team's first-ever No.1 overall Draft pick Sabrina Ionescu, Breanna Stewart, Jonquel Jones, and Courtney Vandersloot. The Liberty have three conference championships and have played in the WNBA Finals five times, falling to the Houston Comets in 1997, 1999, and 2000, losing to the Los Angeles Sparks in 2002 and losing to the Las Vegas Aces in 2023. They have the most appearances in the WNBA Finals without a championship and are the only remaining original franchise in the WNBA without a championship.

Franchise history

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Early success (1997–2002)

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Prior to the team's first season, to avoid potential trademark infringement, the team purchased the trademarks of the defunct Liberty Basketball Association.

When the WNBA opened in 1997, the Liberty were one of the first teams to choose a player, and they signed college superstar Rebecca Lobo (UConn) to a contract. Lobo was a starter for two seasons, but was injured in 1999. Her injuries eventually led to her retirement several seasons later. Point guard Teresa Weatherspoon emerged as a star, and the Liberty made it to the 1997 championship game, where the team lost to the Houston Comets. In 1999, they added Crystal Robinson with the 6th overall pick[3] and returned to the WNBA Finals, where they again faced the Comets. In Game 2, Teresa Weatherspoon's halfcourt shot at the buzzer gave the Liberty a one-point road win that tied the series at a game apiece. However, the Liberty lost the third game of the series and the Comets became champions for a third straight time.

In 2000, the Liberty traded for Tari Phillips who blossomed in New York and made four straight All-Star teams. In 2001, Weatherspoon became the WNBA's all-time assist leader. Teamed with Robinson, Phillips and an emerging Sue Wicks, who was once a back-up to Lobo at forward but made the 2000 All-Star game, Weatherspoon and the Liberty subsequently returned to the finals in 2000 and 2002, but lost once again to the Comets and to the Los Angeles Sparks, respectively. The Liberty also advanced to the WNBA Eastern Conference Finals in 2001.

Transition seasons (2003–2009)

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Madison Square Garden during a Liberty game.

The 2003 season marked a transition for the Liberty and with team leader Teresa Weatherspoon's WNBA career winding down, fan favorite Becky Hammon emerged as a star player. The 2004 season saw Hammon replacing Weatherspoon as the team's starting point guard.

The Liberty played six of their home games during the 2004 season at Radio City Music Hall as Madison Square Garden was hosting the 2004 Republican National Convention.[4] These games marked the first time Radio City had hosted a professional sporting event since the Roy Jones Jr. boxing match held in 1999.

With team leader Tari Phillips being signed away to the Houston Comets, Ann Wauters emerged as a force at the team's starting center position in 2005. However, she was unfortunately injured midway through the season. The loss of Wauters was felt as the team was swept two games to none by the Indiana Fever in the first round of the playoffs.

The Liberty had a poor 2006 season, winning only 11 games, the fewest in franchise history.

At the beginning of the 2007 WNBA season, the team traded Becky Hammon to the San Antonio Silver Stars for Jessica Davenport, a first round pick in the 2007 WNBA draft. They also acquired center Janel McCarville through the dispersal draft associated with the dissolution of the Charlotte Sting. The 2007 Liberty started out 5–0, then lost 7 straight games, then rallied at the end of the season to get the last playoff spot by winning 3 out of their last 4 games, beating the Washington Mystics on the tiebreaker of head-to-head record. In the Eastern Conference semifinals, the Liberty, as huge underdogs, faced the defending champion Detroit Shock in a best-of-three series. The Liberty defeated the Shock by winning Game 1 in New York. In Games 2 and 3 the Liberty lost both games to the Shock in Detroit, 76–73 and 71–70 (OT) respectively.

In 2008, the Liberty drafted former Rutgers shooting guard Essence Carson and former North Carolina forward Erlana Larkins, and signed former Utah point guard Leilani Mitchell during the preseason. Despite having the youngest average age of any WNBA team, the Liberty managed to win 19 regular season games in 2008, to defeat the Connecticut Sun in the first round of playoff action, and to come within two points of defeating the Detroit Shock in the third and last game of the Eastern Conference Finals. Again, the Detroit series entailed a Liberty victory at home in Game 1, followed by narrow defeats away in Games 2 and 3. The 2008 season also featured the "Liberty Outdoor Classic", the first ever professional regular season basketball game to be played outdoors, on July 19 at Arthur Ashe Stadium of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The Indiana Fever defeated the Liberty in the Outdoor Classic.

In the 2009 WNBA draft, the Liberty selected local favorite Kia Vaughn from Rutgers. With a solid core group, the Liberty looked to be a contender in the East yet again.

In the 2009 season, however, they never proved to be a contender and the team fired head coach Pat Coyle. To replace Coyle, the Liberty hired then-Liberty assistant coach Anne Donovan on an interim basis. Despite the coaching change, the franchise continued to struggle, finishing 13–21, their second worst record in franchise history.

The Cappie Pondexter era (2010–2014)

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The New York Liberty fared better in 2010, during Donovan's first and only full season as head coach. Led by newly signed high scorer Cappie Pondexter (formerly of the Phoenix Mercury) and the 2010 Most Improved Player Award winner Leilani Mitchell, the team made it all the way to the Eastern Conference Finals, where they lost to the Atlanta Dream.

The team had high hopes for 2011, after the hiring of former WNBA champion head coach John Whisenant. Janel McCarville did not report to training camp, seeking time with her family, and as such, was suspended for the duration of the 2011 season. This caused division and discord within the New York Liberty fanbase. Kia Vaughn was unexpectedly thrust into the role of starting Center.

The Liberty were originally scheduled to be displaced from their usual home court due to renovations at Madison Square Garden scheduled to begin in 2009. However, the renovation plans were delayed, and the Liberty played at the Garden in 2009 and 2010. The Liberty ended up playing in the Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey, for their 2011, 2012, and 2013 seasons while the renovations were ongoing.

Pondexter and Plenette Pierson, along with improved play from Vaughn, allowed New York to be competitive early in the 2011 season. The team went into the All-Star break in third place in the Eastern Conference. In August, Sidney Spencer was traded to the Phoenix Mercury in exchange for Kara Braxton. By maintaining a fairly even standard of play, the Liberty made their way into the WNBA Playoffs. However, the Liberty fell to the Indiana Fever in the Eastern Conference Semifinals.

Just before the 2014 WNBA Draft, the New York Liberty traded Kelsey Bone, the fourth overall pick in the 2014 WNBA draft (Alyssa Thomas) and the fourth overall pick in the 2015 WNBA draft to the Connecticut Sun for WNBA All-Star Tina Charles, who had requested a trade.

In February 2015, Pondexter was traded to the Chicago Sky for Epiphanny Prince.[5]

The Isiah Thomas era (2015–2018)

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On May 5, 2015, the Liberty hired Thomas as team president overseeing all business and basketball operations of the franchise.[6] Under Thomas' leadership as team president and the coaching staff led by Bill Laimbeer as head coach, the Liberty finished first in the Eastern Conference during the 2015 season.[7]

On August 2, 2015, during halftime at the game against the Seattle Storm, the New York Liberty inducted WNBA legend Becky Hammon into the Liberty's Ring of Honor. Thomas presented Hammon with her ring during the induction ceremony at Madison Square Garden. Hammon is currently the head coach of the WNBA's Las Vegas Aces.

After qualifying for the 2016 WNBA Playoffs, the Liberty lost to the Phoenix Mercury in the second round.[8] The Liberty lost to the Washington Mystics in the second round of the 2017 WNBA Playoffs.

In November 2017, the Madison Square Garden Company and James L. Dolan announced they were actively looking to sell the franchise.[9] After not immediately finding a buyer, MSG relocated most of the Liberty's 2018 home games to Westchester County Center in nearby White Plains, New York, the home of MSG's NBA G League team the Westchester Knicks, while still continuing to pursue a sale.[10] In 2018, the Liberty failed to make the playoffs, with a 7-27 record.

The Tsai era (2019–present)

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On January 23, 2019, the Liberty were sold to Joseph Tsai, co-founder of the Alibaba Group, a Chinese internet company, who then owned 49% of the NBA's Brooklyn Nets,[11] and Clara Wu Tsai, an American businesswoman and founder of nonprofit organization Reform Alliance.[12][13] Isiah Thomas was relieved of his duties a month later, on February 21, 2019.[14] During the 2019 season, the Liberty played two games in Brooklyn at the Nets' home of the Barclays Center, with the rest still in White Plains. Later that year, Joseph Tsai became the sole owner of the Nets and the Barclays Center.[15] For the 2020 season, the Tsais relocated the Liberty to Brooklyn on a full-time basis.[16]

The Liberty were major players in the 2020 WNBA draft, entering that draft with three first-round picks plus two in the early second round. Shortly before the draft, they traded former league MVP Tina Charles to the Washington Mystics in a deal that also involved the Dallas Wings.[17] They chose Sabrina Ionescu as the first pick, with Megan Walker and Jazmine Jones selected later in that round.[18] The team also introduced a new logo, featuring a simplified version of their Statue of Liberty branding. The color black was also made one of the primary colors, echoing the aesthetic of their NBA brother squad, the Brooklyn Nets.[19]

The Liberty began the 2020 season, held in a "bubble" in Bradenton, Florida, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with seven rookies on their opening-night roster.[20] The team suffered a major blow in their third game, in which Ionescu suffered a severe ankle sprain that ultimately ended her season.[21] The Liberty ended the season with a league-worst 2–20 record. Despite the lack of wins, one of the first-year players, 12th overall pick Jazmine Jones, was named to the Associated Press and WNBA's All-Rookie teams.[22][23]

The Liberty made major splashes during the 2021 offseason. Prior to its first season as full-time tenants of Barclays Center, the Liberty added WNBA champions Natasha Howard and Sami Whitcomb in a multi-team trade that sent Kia Nurse and Megan Walker to the Phoenix Mercury [24] and signed Betnijah Laney, the league's 2020 Most Improved Player Award winner.[25] The team then added Michaela Onyenwere and DiDi Richards in the 2021 WNBA Draft. Laney would represent the Liberty at the 2021 WNBA All-Star Game while Onyenwere won the Associated Press' Rookie of the Year Award. New York finished the year with a 12–20 record but the 10-game improvement in the win column was enough to push the team into the WNBA Playoffs for the first time since 2017. Seeded eighth, the Liberty put up a valiant effort against No. 5 Phoenix in the opening but fell by an 83–82 final.

On December 6, 2021, the Liberty and head coach Walt Hopkins Jr. parted ways.[26] The team would hire former Phoenix head coach Sandy Brondello in his place just over a month later on January 7, 2022.[27] On the roster, the team brought in Stefanie Dolson of the defending champion Chicago Sky and drafted Nyara Sabally fifth overall, though the latter would miss her whole rookie season with an injury. In Brondello's first season at the helm, the team was forced to overcome an early injury to Laney and got off to a 1–7 start. But the All-Star efforts of Ionescu and Howard kept the team afloat and they would end the season on a three-game winning streak to secure its second consecutive playoff berth. In the ensuing postseason, the Liberty won the opening game of a best-of-three set with the Chicago Sky but dropped the latter pair.

In 2023, the Liberty made several major transactions that turned them into immediate contenders: the team acquired 2021 WNBA MVP Jonquel Jones from the Connecticut Sun in a three-team deal that also obtained reserve Kayla Thornton from the Dallas Wings. The Liberty then added the equally accomplished Breanna Stewart and Courtney Vandersloot in free agency. Over the ensuing season, the Liberty won a franchise-record 32 games and defeated the Las Vegas Aces in the Commissioner's Cup in-season competition, with Jones securing MVP honors. The Liberty then took down the Washington Mystics and Connecticut Sun in the WNBA Playoffs to earn their first WNBA Finals berth since 2002. Las Vegas, however, took revenge and the best-of-five series in four games.

Season-by-season records

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Season Team Conference Regular season Playoff Results Head coach
W L Win %
New York Liberty
1997 1997 East 2nd 17 11 .607 Won WNBA Semifinals (Phoenix, 1–0)
Lost WNBA Finals (Houston, 0–1)
Nancy Darsch
1998 1998 East 3rd 18 12 .600 Did not qualify Nancy Darsch
1999 1999 East 1st 18 14 .563 Received a bye for the Conference Semifinals
Won Conference Finals (Charlotte, 2–1)
Lost WNBA Finals (Houston, 1–2)
Richie Adubato
2000 2000 East 1st 20 12 .625 Won Conference Semifinals (Washington, 2–0)
Won Conference Finals (Cleveland, 2–1)
Lost WNBA Finals (Houston, 0–2)
Richie Adubato
2001 2001 East 2nd 21 11 .656 Won Conference Semifinals (Miami, 2–1)
Lost Conference Finals (Charlotte, 1–2)
Richie Adubato
2002 2002 East 1st 18 14 .563 Won Conference Semifinals (Indiana, 2–1)
Won Conference Finals (Washington, 2–1)
Lost WNBA Finals (Los Angeles, 0–2)
Richie Adubato
2003 2003 East 6th 16 18 .471 Did not qualify Richie Adubato
2004 2004 East 2nd 18 16 .529 Won Conference Semifinals (Detroit, 2–1)
Lost Conference Finals (Connecticut, 0–2)
R. Adubato (7–9)
P. Coyle (11–7)
2005 2005 East 3rd 18 16 .529 Lost Conference Semifinals (Indiana, 0–2) Pat Coyle
2006 2006 East 5th 11 23 .324 Did not qualify Pat Coyle
2007 2007 East 4th 16 18 .471 Lost Conference Semifinals (Detroit, 1–2) Pat Coyle
2008 2008 East 3rd 19 15 .559 Won Conference Semifinals (Connecticut, 2–1)
Lost Conference Finals (Detroit, 1–2)
Pat Coyle
2009 2009 East 7th 13 21 .382 Did not qualify P. Coyle (6–11)
A. Donovan (7–10)
2010 2010 East 2nd 22 12 .647 Won Conference Semifinals (Indiana, 2–1)
Lost Conference Finals (Atlanta, 0–2)
Anne Donovan
2011 2011 East 4th 19 15 .559 Lost Conference Semifinals (Indiana, 1–2) John Whisenant
2012 2012 East 4th 15 19 .441 Lost Conference Semifinals (Connecticut, 0–2) John Whisenant
2013 2013 East 5th 11 23 .324 Did not qualify Bill Laimbeer
2014 2014 East 5th 15 19 .441 Did not qualify Bill Laimbeer
2015 2015 East 1st 23 11 .676 Won Conference Semifinals (Washington, 2–1)
Lost Conference Finals (Indiana 1–2)
Bill Laimbeer
2016 2016 East 1st 21 13 .618 Lost Second Round (Phoenix 0–1) Bill Laimbeer
2017 2017 East 1st 22 12 .647 Lost Second Round (Washington 0–1) Bill Laimbeer
2018 2018 East 5th 7 27 .206 Did not qualify Katie Smith
2019 2019 East 5th 10 24 .294 Did not qualify Katie Smith
2020 2020 East 6th 2 20 .091 Did not qualify Walt Hopkins
2021 2021 East 3rd 12 20 .375 Lost First Round (Phoenix 0–1) Walt Hopkins
2022 2022 East 4th 16 20 .444 Lost First Round (Chicago 1–2) Sandy Brondello
2023 2023 East 1st 32 8 .800 Won First Round (Washington 2–0)
Won Second Round (Connecticut, 3–1)
Lost WNBA Finals (Las Vegas 1–3)
Sandy Brondello
Regular season 450 444 .503 4 Conference Championships
Playoffs 30 39 .435 0 WNBA Championships, 5 Losses

Statistics

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New York Liberty statistics
1990s
Season Individual Team vs Opponents
PPG RPG APG PPG RPG FG%
1997 S. Witherspoon (14.5) R. Lobo (7.3) T. Weatherspoon (6.1) 68.3 vs 65.9 32.9 vs 33.3 .412 vs .391
1998 S. Witherspoon (13.8) R. Lobo (6.9) T. Weatherspoon (6.4) 68.6 vs 65.5 31.5 vs 29.7 .425 vs .419
1999 V. Johnson (13.3) S. Wicks (7.0) T. Weatherspoon (6.4) 67.8 vs 65.3 29.5 vs 30.7 .418 vs .412
2000s
Season Individual Team vs Opponents
PPG RPG APG PPG RPG FG%
2000 T. Phillips (13.8) T. Phillips (8.0) T. Weatherspoon (6.4) 67.1 vs 63.6 29.4 vs 30.2 .436 vs .407
2001 T. Phillips (15.3) T. Phillips (8.0) T. Weatherspoon (6.3) 67.6 vs 65.1 28.6 vs 30.7 .456 vs .423
2002 T. Phillips (14.1) T. Phillips (7.0) T. Weatherspoon (5.7) 65.3 vs 63.0 27.2 vs 30.0 .444 vs .399
2003 B. Hammon (14.7) T. Phillips (8.5) T. Weatherspoon (4.4) 66.0 vs 66.4 28.1 vs 31.2 .429 vs .419
2004 B. Hammon (13.5) E. Baranova (7.2) B. Hammon (4.4) 66.2 vs 67.6 29.5 vs 32.4 .424 vs .414
2005 B. Hammon (13.9) E. Baranova (6.9) B. Hammon (4.3) 68.1 vs 67.2 28.6 vs 30.3 .445 vs .427
2006 B. Hammon (14.7) K. Schumacher (5.5) B. Hammon (3.7) 69.8 vs 78.2 30.0 vs 34.5 .397 vs .449
2007 S. Christon (11.2) J. McCarville (4.8) L. Moore (4.8) 71.0 vs 73.6 31.6 vs 35.7 .417 vs .414
2008 S. Christon (15.7) C. Kraayeveld (6.1) L. Moore (4.6) 75.7 vs 74.6 32.5 vs 34.6 .421 vs .427
2009 S. Christon (16.1) J. McCarville (5.5) L. Moore (3.9) 73.9 vs 74.6 31.8 vs 35.4 .415 vs .420
2010s
Season Individual Team vs Opponents
PPG RPG APG PPG RPG FG%
2010 C. Pondexter (21.4) J. McCarville (5.9) C. Pondexter (4.9) 79.2 vs 76.0 31.2 vs 32.0 .453 vs .436
2011 C. Pondexter (17.4) K. Vaughn (6.7) C. Pondexter (4.7) 76.0 vs 74.8 32.8 vs 32.4 .433 vs .429
2012 C. Pondexter (20.4) P. Pierson (5.4) C. Pondexter (4.3) 73.1 vs 77.2 33.4 vs 34.4 .425 vs .429
2013 C. Pondexter (16.9) K. Braxton (6.6) C. Pondexter (4.0) 69.6 vs 77.0 37.5 vs 35.0 .404 vs .408
2014 T. Charles (17.4) T. Charles (9.4) C. Pondexter (3.9) 72.1 vs 75.2 34.8 vs 33.9 .422 vs .426
2015 T. Charles (17.1) T. Charles (8.5) T. Wright (3.5) 74.4 vs 71.1 36.7 vs 31.5 .426 vs .393
2016 T. Charles (21.5) T. Charles (9.9) T. Charles (3.8) 81.6 vs 80.9 38.6 vs 34.0 .434 vs .413
2017 T. Charles (19.7) T. Charles (9.4) E. Prince (2.9) 79.7 vs 76.6 38.7 vs 31.8 .425 vs .408
2018 T. Charles (19.7) T. Charles (7.0) B. Boyd (5.3) 77.7 vs 84.8 34.1 vs 35.2 .432 vs .439
2019 T. Charles (16.9) T. Charles (7.5) B. Boyd (4.6) 77.4 vs 84.7 34.6 vs 35.7 .414 vs .438
2020s
Season Individual Team vs Opponents
PPG RPG APG PPG RPG FG%
2020 K. Nurse (12.2) A. Zahui B. (8.5) L. Clarendon (4.9) 71.9 vs 85.9 35.8 vs 37.0 .372 vs .444
2021 B. Laney (16.8) N. Howard (7.2) S. Ionescu (6.1) 78.5 vs 85.5 33.3 vs 36.6 .427 vs .438
2022 S. Ionescu (17.4) N. Howard (7.3) S. Ionescu (6.3) 79.6 vs 82.0 34.2 vs 35.7 .431 vs .418
2023 B. Stewart (23.0) B. Stewart (9.3) C. Vandersloot (8.1) 89.2 vs 80.6 37.9 vs 33.0 .460 vs .424

Current roster

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PlayersCoaches
Pos.No.Nat.NameHeightWeightDOBFromYrs
G/F2 Burke, Kennedy6' 1" (1.85m)182 lb (83kg)1997-02-14UCLA4
G1 Davis, Marquesha6' 0" (1.83m)2001-05-29MississippiR
G18 Dojkić, Ivana5' 11" (1.8m)154 lb (70kg)1997-12-24Croatia1
F13 Fiebich, Leonie6' 4" (1.93m)2000-01-10GermanyR
G20 Ionescu, Sabrina5' 11" (1.8m)165 lb (75kg)1997-12-06Oregon4
C35 Jones, Jonquel6' 6" (1.98m)215 lb (98kg)1994-01-05George Washington7
G/F44 Laney, Betnijah  6' 0" (1.83m)166 lb (75kg)1993-10-29Rutgers8
C8 Sabally, Nyara  6' 5" (1.96m)204 lb (93kg)2000-02-26Oregon1
F30 Stewart, Breanna6' 4" (1.93m)170 lb (77kg)1994-08-27Connecticut7
F5 Thornton, Kayla6' 1" (1.85m)188 lb (85kg)1992-10-20UTEP8
G22 Vandersloot, Courtney5' 8" (1.73m)137 lb (62kg)1989-02-08Gonzaga13
Head coach
  Sandy Brondello
Assistant coaches
  Olaf Lange
  Roneeka Hodges (Florida State)
  Zach O'Brien (Saint Joseph's College of Maine)
Athletic trainer
Terri Acosta
Strength and conditioning coach
Emily Zaler

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (DP) Unsigned draft pick
  • (FA) Free agent
  • (S) Suspended
  •   Injured

  WNBA roster page

Other rights owned

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Nationality Name Years pro Last played Drafted
  Marine Fauthoux 2021
  Raquel Carrera 2021

Former players

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Honored numbers

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New York Liberty honored numbers
No. Player Position Tenure
11 Teresa Weatherspoon G 1997–2003

Ring of Honor

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Coaches and staff

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Owners

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General Managers

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Head coaches

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New York Liberty head coaches
Name Start End Seasons Regular season Playoffs
W L Win % G W L Win % G
Nancy Darsch 1997 1998 2 35 23 .603 58 1 1 .500 2
Richie Adubato 1998 2004 5 100 78 .562 178 14 13 .519 27
Pat Coyle 2004 2009 5 81 90 .474 171 6 10 .375 16
Anne Donovan 2009 2010 2 29 22 .569 51 2 3 .400 5
John Whisenant 2010 2012 2 34 34 .500 68 1 4 .200 5
Bill Laimbeer 2013 2017 5 92 78 .541 170 3 5 .375 8
Katie Smith 2018 2019 2 17 51 .250 68 0 0 0
Walt Hopkins 2020 2021 2 14 40 .259 54 0 1 0
Sandy Brondello 2022 present 2 48 28 .632 76 7 6 .538 13

Assistant coaches

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All-time notes

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Home arenas

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Regular season attendance

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  • A sellout for a basketball game at Madison Square Garden (1997–2010) is 19,563.
  • A sellout for a basketball game at Prudential Center (2011–2013) is 18,711.
  • A sellout for a basketball game at Madison Square Garden (2013–2017) is 19,812.
  • A sellout for a basketball game at Westchester County Center (2018–2019) is 5,000.
  • A sellout for a Liberty game at Barclays Center (2021–present) is considered to be 8,575, the team's initial cap on ticket sales at that venue. The full capacity for basketball is 17,732.
Regular season all-time attendance
Year Average High Low Sellouts Total for year WNBA game average
1997 13,270 (2nd) 18,051 8,554 0 185,786 9,669
1998 14,935 (2nd) 19,563 11,276 1 224,024 10,869
1999 13,797 (2nd) 16,782 10,940 0 220,748 10,207
2000 14,498 (2nd) 19,563 11,257 1 231,962 9,074
2001 15,671 (1st) 18,213 12,262 0 250,735 9,075
2002 14,670 (2nd) 19,563 12,037 1 234,717 9,228
2003 12,491 (2nd) 15,424 10,711 0 212,346 8,800
2004 9,629 (3rd) 15,698 5,945 0 163,686 8,613
2005 10,145 (1st) 12,543 7,897 0 172,471 8,172
2006 9,120 (2nd) 14,070 7,751 0 155,048 7,476
2007 8,677 (2nd) 11,341 6,267 0 147,506 7,742
2008 9,045 (4th) 19,393 6,928 0 153,772 7,948
2009 9,800 (3rd) 15,667 8,018 0 166,604 8,039
2010 11,069 (1st) 18,162 7,537 0 188,173 7,834
2011 7,702 (8th) 14,314 5,725 0 130,936 7,954
2012 6,779 (9th) 14,715 4,723 0 115,241 7,452
2013 7,189 (7th) 12,858 5,766 0 122,217 7,531
2014 8,949 (3rd) 17,252 7,023 0 152,128 7,578
2015 9,159 (3rd) 18,617 5,663 0 155,695 7,184
2016 9,724 (2nd) 14,503 7,356 165,300 7,655
2017 9,888 (4th) 17,443 7,004 0 168,096 7,716
2018 2,823 (12th) 12,488 1,419 0 47,988 6,721
2019 2,239 (12th) 7,715 1,181 0 38,067 6,535
2020 Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the season was played in Bradenton, Florida, without fans.[29][30]
2021 1,874 (9th) 3,114 815 0 28,113 2,636
2022 5,327 (8th) 9,896 3,054 0 95,882 5,679
2023 7,777 (5th) 11,615 5,719 0 155,535 6,615

Draft picks

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  • 1997 Elite: Kym Hampton (4), Vickie Johnson (12)
  • 1997: Sue Wicks (6), Sophia Witherspoon (11), Trena Trice (22), Kisha Ford (27)
  • 1998: Alicia Thompson (9), Nadine Domond (19), Albena Branzova (29), Vanessa Nygaard (39)
  • 1999: Crystal Robinson (6), Michele Van Gorp (18), Tamika Whitmore (30), Carolyn Jones-Young (42)
  • 2000: Olga Firsova (13), Desiree Francis (29), Jessica Bibby (45), Natalie Porter (61)
  • 2001: Taru Tuukkanen (57), Tara Mitchem (60)
  • 2002: Linda Frohlich (26), Tracy Gahan (46), Dee Dee Warley (62)
  • 2003 Miami/Portland Dispersal Draft: Elena Baranova (11)
  • 2003: Molly Creamer (10), Erin Thorn (17), Sonja Mallory (24), Kristen Brook Sharp (26), Nicole Kaczmarski (39)
  • 2004 Cleveland Dispersal Draft: Ann Wauters (4)
  • 2004: Shameka Christon (5), Amisha Carter (17), Cathy Joens (30)
  • 2005: Loree Moore (10), Tabitha Pool (23), Rebecca Richman (36)
  • 2006: Sherill Baker (12), Brooke Queenan (23), Christelle N'Garsanet (37)
  • 2007 Charlotte Dispersal Draft: Janel McCarville (3)
  • 2007: Tiffany Jackson (5), Shay Doron (16), Martina Weber (29)
  • 2008: Essence Carson (7), Erlana Larkins (14), Wanisha Smith (27), Alberta Auguste (35)
  • 2009 Houston Dispersal Draft: selection waived
  • 2009: Kia Vaughn (8), Abby Waner (21)
  • 2010 Sacramento Dispersal Draft: Nicole Powell (1)
  • 2010: Kalana Greene (13), Ashley Houts (16), Cory Montgomery (25)
  • 2011: Alex Montgomery (10), Angel Robinson (22), Mekia Valentine (34)
  • 2012: Kelley Cain (7), Katelan Redmon (36)
  • 2013: Kelsey Bone (5), Toni Young (7), Kamiko Williams (15), Shenneika Smith (25), Olcay Çakır (27)
  • 2014: Alyssa Thomas (4), Tyaunna Marshall (14), Meighan Simmons (26)
  • 2015: Brittany Boyd (9), Kiah Stokes (11), Amber Orrange (23), Laurin Mincy (27), Michala Johnson (28)
  • 2016: Adut Bulgak (12), Ameryst Alston (24), Shacobia Barbee (36)
  • 2017: Lindsay Allen (14), Kai James (34)
  • 2018: Kia Nurse (10), Mercedes Russell (22), Leslie Robinson (34)
  • 2019: Asia Durr (2), Han Xu (14), Megan Huff (26)
  • 2020: Sabrina Ionescu (1), Megan Walker (9), Jazmine Jones (12), Kylee Shook (13), Leaonna Odom (15), Erica Ogwumike (26; traded to Minnesota)
  • 2021: Michaela Onyenwere (6), DiDi Richards (17), Valerie Higgins (25), Marine Fauthoux (29)
  • 2022: Nyara Sabally (5), Sika Koné (29)
  • 2023: Okako Adika (30)
  • 2024: Marquesha Davis (11), Esmery Martinez (17), Jessika Carter, (23), Kaitlyn Davis (35)

Trades

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  • December 15, 1999: The Liberty acquired Michele Van Gorp from the Portland Fire in exchange for Portland agreeing to select Sophia Witherspoon and Coquese Washington in the expansion draft.
  • May 28, 2000: The Liberty traded Carolyn Jones-Young to the Portland Fire in exchange for Tari Phillips.
  • February 24, 2006: The Liberty traded the 9th overall pick in the 2006 Draft to the Indiana Fever in exchange for Kelly Schumacher and the 12th overall pick in the 2006 Draft.
  • April 4, 2007: The Liberty traded Becky Hammon and a second-round pick in the 2008 Draft to the San Antonio Silver Stars in exchange for draft rights to Jessica Davenport and a first-round pick in the 2008 Draft.
  • June 20, 2007: The Liberty traded Sherill Baker to the Los Angeles Sparks in exchange for Lisa Willis.
  • May 7, 2008: The Liberty traded a third-round pick in the 2009 Draft to the Phoenix Mercury in exchange for Leilani Mitchell.
  • May 5, 2009: The Liberty traded a first-round pick in the 2010 Draft to the Los Angeles Sparks in exchange for Sidney Spencer.
  • March 30, 2010: The Liberty traded Shameka Christon and Cathrine Kraayeveld to the Chicago Sky in exchange for a second-round pick in the 2010 Draft and Cappie Pondexter and Kelly Mazzante from the Phoenix Mercury. Phoenix received Candice Dupree from Chicago as part of this trade.
  • April 11, 2011: The Liberty traded Angel Robinson to the Minnesota Lynx in exchange for Jessica Breland and a second-round pick in the 2012 Draft.
  • April 11, 2011: The Liberty traded Kalana Greene to the Connecticut Sun in exchange for Sydney Colson.
  • May 27, 2011: The Liberty acquired Quanitra Hollingsworth from the Minnesota Lynx in exchange for the right to swap third-round picks in the 2012 Draft.
  • August 4, 2011: The Liberty traded Sidney Spencer to the Phoenix Mercury in exchange for Kara Braxton.
  • February 27, 2013: The Liberty traded Kia Vaughn to the Washington Mystics in exchange for a second-round pick in the 2013 Draft.
  • March 1, 2013: The Liberty traded Janel McCarville to the Minnesota Lynx and Nicole Powell plus a third-round pick in the 2013 Draft to the Tulsa Shock. In exchange, the Liberty received Deanna Nolan, a second-round pick in the 2013 Draft, and a third-round pick in the 2013 Draft.
  • April 15, 2013: The Liberty traded Quanitra Hollingsworth to the Washington Mystics in exchange for the 25th overall pick in the 2013 Draft.
  • April 14, 2014: The Liberty traded Kelsey Bone, Alyssa Thomas, and a first-round pick in the 2015 Draft to the Connecticut Sun in exchange for Tina Charles.
  • July 9, 2014: The Liberty traded DeLisha Milton-Jones to the Atlanta Dream in exchange for Swin Cash.
  • February 16, 2015: The Liberty traded Cappie Pondexter to the Chicago Sky in exchange for Epiphanny Prince.
  • April 16, 2015: The Liberty traded Alex Montgomery to the San Antonio Stars in exchange for the 9th overall pick in the 2015 Draft. The Liberty also traded Anna Cruz and 16th and 35th overall pick to the Minnesota Lynx in exchange for the 11th, 23rd and 28th overall pick in the 2015 Draft.
  • May 2, 2016: The Liberty traded a second-round pick in the 2017 Draft to the Atlanta Dream in exchange for Shoni Schimmel.
  • May 11, 2016: The Liberty traded a first-round pick in the 2017 Draft to the Dallas Wings in exchange for Amanda Zahui B. and a second-round pick in the 2017 Draft.
  • January 30, 2017: The Liberty traded Carolyn Swords, a first-round pick in the 2017 Draft to the Seattle Storm in exchange for Kia Vaughn and Bria Hartley.
  • April 11, 2019 : The Liberty traded their second round pick in the 2020 Draft to Minnesota Lynx in exchange for Tanisha Wright.
  • April 11, 2020: The Liberty engaged in a three team trade where the team acquired the 13th pick in the 2020 Draft and sent Sugar Rodgers to Las Vegas.
  • April 17, 2020: The Liberty traded the draft rights to Erica Ogwumike to Minnesota in exchange for Stephanie Talbot.
  • April 17, 2020: The Liberty acquired the draft rights for Jocelyn Willoughby from Phoenix in exchange for Shatori Walker-Kimbrough.
  • February 10, 2021: The Liberty traded Kia Nurse and Megan Walker to Phoenix in exchange for the 6th pick in the 2021 Draft and the Mercury's first-round pick in the 2022 Draft.
  • February 10, 2021: The Liberty traded the 1st overall pick in the 2021 Draft, a second-round pick in the 2022 Draft, and their second-round 2022 Draft pick to Seattle in exchange for Natasha Howard.
  • February 10, 2021: The Liberty traded the rights to Stephanie Talbot to Seattle in exchange for Sami Whitcomb.
  • April 11, 2022: The Liberty traded their Second Round pick in the 2023 Draft to Seattle in exchange for the rights to Lorela Cubaj.
  • June 8, 2022: The Liberty traded Asia Durr to Atlanta in exchange for Megan Walker and the rights to Raquel Carrera.
  • January 16, 2023 The Liberty traded Rebecca Allen, the 6th pick in the 2023 Draft, Natasha Howard, and Crystal Dangerfield as part of a three team trade and received Jonquel Jones and Kayla Thornton.
  • February 11, 2023 The Liberty traded Michaela Onyenwere as part of a four team trade and received the rights to Leonie Fiebich, Chicago's second round pick in the 2024 Draft, and the rights to swap first-round picks in the 2025 Draft with Phoenix.

All-Stars

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  • 1999: Kym Hampton, Vickie Johnson, Rebecca Lobo, Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 2000: Tari Phillips, Teresa Weatherspoon, Sue Wicks
  • 2001: Vickie Johnson, Tari Phillips, Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 2002: Tari Phillips, Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 2003: Becky Hammon, Tari Phillips, Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 2004: Becky Hammon
  • 2005: Becky Hammon, Ann Wauters
  • 2006: None
  • 2007: None
  • 2008: No All-Star Game
  • 2009: Shameka Christon
  • 2010: Cappie Pondexter
  • 2011: Essence Carson, Cappie Pondexter
  • 2012: No All-Star Game
  • 2013: Cappie Pondexter
  • 2014: Tina Charles, Cappie Pondexter
  • 2015: Tina Charles
  • 2016: No All-Star Game
  • 2017: Tina Charles, Sugar Rodgers
  • 2018: Tina Charles
  • 2019: Tina Charles, Kia Nurse
  • 2020: No All-Star Game
  • 2021: Betnijah Laney
  • 2022: Natasha Howard, Sabrina Ionescu
  • 2023: Sabrina Ionescu, Breanna Stewart, Courtney Vandersloot

Olympians

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  • 2016: Tina Charles
  • 2020: Rebecca Allen (AUS), Han Xu (CHN), Marine Johannès (FRA)

Honors and awards

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  • 1997 All-WNBA Second Team: Rebecca Lobo
  • 1997 All-WNBA Second Team: Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 1997 Defensive Player of the Year: Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 1998 All-WNBA Second Team: Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 1998 Defensive Player of the Year: Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 1999 All-WNBA Second Team: Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 2000 All-WNBA Second Team: Teresa Weatherspoon
  • 2000 Most Improved Player: Tari Phillips
  • 2001 Kim Perrot Sportsmanship Award: Sue Wicks
  • 2002 All-WNBA Second Team: Tari Phillips
  • 2005 All-WNBA Second Team: Becky Hammon
  • 2007 Most Improved Player: Janel McCarville
  • 2007 All-Defensive Second Team: Loree Moore
  • 2010 All-WNBA First Team: Cappie Pondexter
  • 2010 Most Improved Player: Leilani Mitchell
  • 2010 All-Defensive First Team: Cappie Pondexter
  • 2010 All-Rookie Team: Kalana Greene
  • 2011 All-WNBA Second Team: Cappie Pondexter
  • 2011 Most Improved Player: Kia Vaughn
  • 2012 All-WNBA First Team: Cappie Pondexter
  • 2013 All-Rookie Team: Kelsey Bone
  • 2014 All-WNBA Second Team: Tina Charles
  • 2015 Coach of the Year: Bill Laimbeer
  • 2015 All-Rookie Team: Brittany Boyd
  • 2015 All-Rookie Team: Kiah Stokes
  • 2015 All-Defensive Second Team: Tina Charles
  • 2015 All-Defensive Second Team: Kiah Stokes
  • 2015 All-Defensive Second Team: Tanisha Wright
  • 2015 All-WNBA First Team: Tina Charles
  • 2015 All-WNBA Second Team: Epiphanny Prince
  • 2016 Peak Performer (Points): Tina Charles
  • 2016 Peak Performer (Rebounds): Tina Charles
  • 2016 All-Defensive Second Team: Tanisha Wright
  • 2017 WNBA Sixth Woman of the Year: Sugar Rodgers
  • 2020 All-Rookie Team: Jazmine Jones
  • 2021 All-Rookie Team: Michaela Onyenwere
  • 2021 All-Rookie Team: DiDi Richards
  • 2021 Rookie of the Year: Michaela Onyenwere
  • 2022 All-WNBA Second Team: Sabrina Ionescu
  • 2023 Peak Performer (Assists): Courtney Vandersloot
  • 2023 All-Defensive first team: Breanna Stewart
  • 2023 All-Defensive second team: Betnijah Laney
  • 2023 WNBA MVP: Breanna Stewart
  • 2023 All-WNBA First Team: Breanna Stewart
  • 2023 All-WNBA Second Team: Sabrina Ionescu
  • 2023 WNBA Executive of the Year: Jonathan Kolb

Media coverage

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On March 12, 2024, it was announced that Liberty games would be broadcast on WNYW and WWOR beginning with the 2024 season. [31]

On June 4, 2024, the Liberty launched their direct-to-consumer service "Liberty Live", which would be the streaming home of the New York Liberty.[32]

Previously, games had been broadcast on MSG Network and the YES Network. Broadcasters for the Liberty games are Chris Shearn and Julianne Viani.[33]

Some Liberty games are broadcast nationally on CBS, CBS Sports Network, Ion Television, ESPN, ESPN2 and ABC.[34]

Notes

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  1. ^ Two games
  2. ^ Liberty Outdoor Classic
  3. ^ Six games

References

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  1. ^ "A Closer Look Inside: NY Liberty Logo History". Liberty.WNBA.com. NBA Media Ventures, LLC. April 14, 2020. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  2. ^ "New York Liberty Reproduction Guideline Sheet". WNBA Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  3. ^ "WNBA.com: Crystal Robinson Playerfile". Archived from the original on 2014-02-01. Retrieved 2014-01-29.
  4. ^ Lena Williams (25 July 2004). "PRO BASKETBALL; Liberty Opens Big on Its Home, Er, Stage". The New York Times. Retrieved 10 November 2011.
  5. ^ "Sky send Epiphanny Prince to New York for Cappie Pondexter". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on February 16, 2015. Retrieved February 16, 2015.
  6. ^ "Liberty introduce Team President Isiah Thomas". New York Liberty.
  7. ^ Berman, Marc. "Isiah Thomas – yes, that Isiah Thomas – is Liberty's Mr. Fix-t". New York Post.
  8. ^ "New York Liberty get eliminated by Phoenix Mercury". 24 September 2016. Retrieved 1 October 2016.
  9. ^ Voepel, Mechelle (November 15, 2017). "Jim Dolan parting ways with New York Liberty was only a matter of time". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 24, 2017.
  10. ^ "MSG to Operate Liberty While Continuing to Pursue Sale, Westchester County Center to Serve as Team's Primary Home for 2018". New York Liberty. February 8, 2018.
  11. ^ Draper, Kevin (23 January 2019). "Joe Tsai Makes Purchase of the Liberty Official". The New York Times. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  12. ^ Negley, Cassandra (2023-02-09). "Liberty co-owner Clara Wu Tsai believes charter flights 'enough of a topic' within WNBA that commissioner will address it". Yahoo Sports. Retrieved 2023-10-05.
  13. ^ Streeter, Kurt (2023-05-17). "The Liberty Took a Few Jets and a Boat to Become a Superteam". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2023-10-05.
  14. ^ Kussoy, Howie (22 February 2019). "Isiah Thomas is no longer running the Liberty". New York Post. Retrieved 8 February 2023.
  15. ^ "NBA Board of Governors approves sale of Nets to Joe Tsai" (Press release). National Basketball Association. September 18, 2019. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  16. ^ "New York Liberty Announce Barclays Center as Home Venue Beginning in 2020". OurSports Central. October 17, 2019.
  17. ^ "Liberty trade Tina Charles to Mystics in 3-team deal". ESPN.com. Associated Press. April 15, 2020. Retrieved April 16, 2020.
  18. ^ "WNBA Draft '20: Draft Board". WNBA. April 17, 2020. Retrieved April 18, 2020.
  19. ^ "New York Liberty Unveil New Logo Prior to WNBA Draft". 14 April 2020.
  20. ^ Voepel, Mechelle (June 26, 2020). "New York Liberty sign seventh rookie in Joyner Holmes". ESPN.com. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  21. ^ "Liberty's Sabrina Ionescu won't need surgery on her sprained left ankle". ESPN.com. August 22, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  22. ^ "New York Liberty's Jazmine Jones named to AP's All-Rookie team". 15 September 2020.
  23. ^ "Jazmine Jones Named to WNBA's 2020 All-Rookie Team". New York Liberty.
  24. ^ "Liberty welcome WNBA champions Natasha Howard, Sami Whitcomb, trade Kia Nurse and Megan Walker in deals with Storm, Mercury". New York Daily News. 10 February 2021.
  25. ^ "New York Liberty sign 2020 Most Improved Player Betnijah Laney". Empire Sports Media. 2 February 2021.
  26. ^ "BREAKING: New York Liberty, Walt Hopkins part ways". 6 December 2021.
  27. ^ "New York Liberty to hire Sandy Brondello as new head coach (Report)". January 2022.
  28. ^ "WNBA Announces Sale of New York Liberty to Joe Tsai". wnba.com. WNBA. January 23, 2019. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  29. ^ "WNBA Announces Plan To Tip Off 2020 Season". WNBA. 2020-06-15. Retrieved 2020-06-17.
  30. ^ "WNBA announces plans for 2020 season to start late July in Florida". NBC Sports Washington. 2020-06-15. Retrieved 2020-06-15.
  31. ^ "Liberty Land New TV Deal, Games to be Broadcast on NYC Fox Affiliate". 12 March 2024.
  32. ^ "N.Y. Liberty launch DTC streaming service". 4 June 2024.
  33. ^ "YES Network becomes official regional TV partner of WNBA's New York Liberty" (Press release). Yes Network. 2019-05-22. Retrieved 2019-05-23.
  34. ^ "WNBA Extends TV Rights Deal with ESPN and ABC". Sports Business. June 18, 2007. Retrieved 2009-08-04.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
None
WNBA Eastern Conference co-champions
with Houston Comets

1997
Succeeded by
No title awarded
Preceded by
No title awarded
WNBA Eastern Conference champions
1999, 2000
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Charlotte Sting
WNBA Eastern Conference champions
2002
Succeeded by