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West Sussex (UK Parliament constituency)

West Sussex (formally the Western division of Sussex) was a parliamentary constituency in the county of Sussex, which returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the bloc vote system.

West Sussex
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
18321885
Number of memberstwo
Replaced byChichester
Horsham
Lewes
Created fromSussex

It was created under the Great Reform Act for the 1832 general election, and abolished for the 1885 general election.

BoundariesEdit

1832-1885: The Rapes of Arundel, Bramber and Chichester.[1]

Members of ParliamentEdit

Election resultsEdit

Elections in the 1840sEdit

General election 1841: West Sussex[4][2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Gordon-Lennox Unopposed
Conservative Charles Wyndham Unopposed
Registered electors 3,618
Conservative gain from Whig
Conservative gain from Whig

Wyndham resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, causing a by-election.

By-election, 2 February 1847: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Prime Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1847: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Gordon-Lennox Unopposed
Conservative Richard Prime Unopposed
Registered electors 3,488
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1850sEdit

General election 1852: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Gordon-Lennox Unopposed
Conservative Richard Prime Unopposed
Registered electors 3,257
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Prime resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, causing a by-election.

By-election, 13 February 1854: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Henry Wyndham Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1857: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Gordon-Lennox Unopposed
Conservative Henry Wyndham Unopposed
Registered electors 2,941
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Gordon-Lennox was appointed President of the Poor Law Board, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 9 March 1859: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Gordon-Lennox Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1859: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Gordon-Lennox Unopposed
Conservative Henry Wyndham Unopposed
Registered electors 2,853
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1860sEdit

Gordon-Lennox succeeded to the peerage, becoming 6th Duke of Richmond and causing a by-election.

By-election, 27 December 1860: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Walter Barttelot Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1865: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Walter Barttelot Unopposed
Conservative Henry Wyndham Unopposed
Registered electors 2,607
Conservative hold
Conservative hold
General election 1868: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Walter Barttelot Unopposed
Conservative Henry Wyndham Unopposed
Registered electors 3,672
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Wyndham succeeded to the peerage, becoming 2nd Baron Leconfield and causing a by-election.

By-election, 17 April 1869: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Gordon-Lennox Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1870sEdit

General election 1874: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Walter Barttelot Unopposed
Conservative Charles Gordon-Lennox Unopposed
Registered electors 3,865
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1880sEdit

General election 1880: West Sussex[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Walter Barttelot Unopposed
Conservative Charles Gordon-Lennox Unopposed
Registered electors 3,886
Conservative hold
Conservative hold

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The statutes of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. 2 & 3 William IV. Cap. LXIV. An Act to settle and describe the Divisions of Counties, and the Limits of Cities and Boroughs, in England and Wales, in so far as respects the Election of Members to serve in Parliament". London: His Majesty's statute and law printers. 1832. pp. 300–383. Retrieved 2017-07-27.
  2. ^ a b c d e Stooks Smith, Henry (1845). The Parliaments of England, from 1st George I., to the Present Time. Vol II: Oxfordshire to Wales Inclusive. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. p. 75. Retrieved 3 June 2019 – via Google Books.
  3. ^ a b Churton, Edward (1836). The Assembled Commons or Parliamentary Biographer. pp. 112, 167. Retrieved 3 June 2019 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (e-book) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. pp. 472–473. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.