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United States presidential election in Kansas, 2016

The 2016 United States presidential election in Kansas was held on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 General Election in which all 50 states plus The District of Columbia participated. Kansas voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting the Republican Party's nominee, businessman Donald Trump, and running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her running mate, Virginia Senator Tim Kaine.

United States presidential election in Kansas, 2016

← 2012 November 8, 2016 2020 →
Turnout67.40% Increase
  Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Nominee Donald Trump Hillary Clinton
Party Republican Democratic
Home state New York New York
Running mate Mike Pence Tim Kaine
Electoral vote 6 0
Popular vote 671,018 427,005
Percentage 56.6% 36.0%

Kansas Presidential Election Results 2016.svg
County Results

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Donald Trump
Republican

Treemap of the popular vote by county.

On March 5, 2016, in the presidential primaries, voters expressed their preferences for the Democratic and Republican parties' respective nominees for president.

Donald Trump won the election in Kansas with 56.6% of the vote. Hillary Clinton received 36.0% of the vote.[1] Kansas was among the eleven states in which Hillary Clinton outperformed Barack Obama's margin in 2012 (though her percentage was lower than Obama's 38% of the vote), largely due to a significant shift towards Democrats in Johnson County.[2]

Contents

BackgroundEdit

The incumbent President of the United States, Barack Obama, a Democrat and former U.S. Senator from Illinois, was first elected president in the 2008 election, running with then-Senator Joe Biden of Delaware. Defeating the Republican nominee, Senator John McCain of Arizona, with 52.9% of the popular vote and 68% of the electoral vote,[3][4] Obama succeeded two-term Republican President George W. Bush, the former Governor of Texas. Obama and Biden were reelected in the 2012 presidential election, defeating former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney with 51.1% of the popular vote and 61.7% of electoral votes.[5] Although Barack Obama's approval rating in the RealClearPolitics poll tracking average remained between 40 and 50 percent for most of his second term, it has experienced a surge in early 2016 and reached its highest point since 2012 during June of that year.[6][7] Analyst Nate Cohn has noted that a strong approval rating for President Obama would equate to a strong performance for the Democratic candidate, and vice versa.[8]

Following his second term, President Obama is not eligible for another reelection. In October 2015, Obama's running-mate and two-term Vice President Biden decided not to enter the race for the Democratic presidential nomination either.[9] With their term expiring on January 20, 2017, the electorate is asked to elect a new president, the 45th president and 48th vice president of the United States, respectively.

Political landscape in KansasEdit

The state of Kansas has given its electoral votes to the Republican ticket since 1968, and only once to the Democrats (1964) since 1940. All current statewide officials are Republicans, as are all four members of the state's U.S. House delegation. Mitt Romney defeated Barack Obama by a margin of 60% to 38% in 2012. A poll conducted by John Zogby found Clinton leading Trump by 7 points in June.↵In addition, an internal poll for Representative Kevin Yoder, a Republican from Kansas' 3rd congressional district, released an internal poll showing Clinton leading Trump by 6 points in his district. This district voted for Mitt Romney by a 10-point margin in 2012 and has a PVI of R+6. This result, coupled with Clinton's gains in nationtional polls, caused Larry Sabato's Crystal Ball to move the Kansas race from "Safe Republican" to "Likely Republican" on August 18.[10]

Primary electionsEdit

Democratic caucusesEdit

 
Results of the Democratic caucuses by Congressional District
  Bernie Sanders
Kansas Democratic caucuses, March 5, 2016
Candidate District delegates Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Bernie Sanders 26,637 67.90% 23 0 23
Hillary Clinton 12,593 32.10% 10 4 14
Uncommitted N/A 0 0 0
Total 39,230 100% 33 4 37
Source: The Green Papers

Republican caucusesEdit

 
Results of the Republican caucuses by Congressional District
  Ted Cruz
Kansas Republican precinct caucuses, March 5, 2016
Candidate Votes Percentage Actual delegate count
Bound Unbound Total
  Ted Cruz 37,512 47.50% 24 0 24
Donald Trump 18,443 23.35% 9 0 9
Marco Rubio 13,295 16.83% 6 0 6
John Kasich 8,741 11.07% 1 0 1
Ben Carson (withdrawn) 582 0.74% 0 0 0
Uncommitted 279 0.35% 0 0 0
Jeb Bush (withdrawn) 84 0.11% 0 0 0
Carly Fiorina (withdrawn) 42 0.05% 0 0 0
Unprojected delegates: 0 0 0
Total: 78,978 100.00% 40 0 40
Source: The Green Papers

General electionEdit

PollingEdit

Minor candidatesEdit

The following received write-in status:[11]

  • President: Andrew D. Basiago; Vice President: Karen D. Kinnison
  • President: Darrell L Castle; Vice President: Scott N. Bradley
  • President: "Rocky" Roque De La Fuente, Vice President: Michael Steinberg
  • President: Rocky Giordani; Vice President: Farley M Anderson
  • President: James A Hedges; Vice President: Bill V Bayes
  • President: Tom Hoefling; Vice President: Steve Schulin
  • President: Lynn Kahn; Vice President: Kathy Monahan
  • President: Gloria La Riva; Vice President: Eugene Puryer
  • President: Michael S. Levinson; Vice President: Perry E. Wharton, II
  • President: Michael A Maturen; Vice President: Juan A Munoz
  • President: Evan McMullin; Vice President: Nathan D Johnson
  • President: Monica G. Moorehead; Vice President: Lamont G. Lilly
  • President: Darryl Perry; Vice President: Conan Salada
  • President: Marshall R. Schoenke; Vice President: James C. Mitchell, Jr.
  • President: Joe C Schriner; Vice President: Joe Moreaux
  • President: Mike Smith; Vice President: Daniel White

ResultsEdit

Candidate Popular vote Percentage
Donald Trump 671,018 56.65%
Hillary Clinton 427,005 36.05%
Gary Johnson 55,406 4.64%
Jill Stein 23,506 1.97%
Evan McMullin (write-in) 6,520 0.55%
Darrell Castle (write-in) 646 0.05%
Mike Maturen (write-in) 214 0.02%
Tom Hoefling (write-in) 45 <0.01%
Gloria La Riva (write-in) 7 <0.01%
Mike Smith (write-in) 6 <0.01%
Rocky De La Fuente (write-in) 3 <0.01%
James Hedges (write-in) 3 <0.01%
Lynn Kahn (write-in) 2 <0.01%
Other write-ins 10,374 0.87%
Total 1,194,755 100.00%
Source: 2016 Presidential General Election Results - Kansas

By congressional districtEdit

Trump won 3 of the 4 congressional districts.[12]

District Trump Clinton Representative
1st 69% 24% Tim Huelskamp
Roger Marshall
2nd 56% 37% Lynn Jenkins
3rd 46% 47% Kevin Yoder
4th 60% 33% Mike Pompeo

By countyEdit

County Clinton% Clinton# Trump% Trump# Others% Others# Total
Allen 26.27% 1,433 66.94% 3,651 6.78% 370 5,454
Anderson 20.06% 672 72.69% 2,435 7.25% 243 3,350
Atchison 30.25% 1,989 61.58% 4,049 8.17% 537 6,575
Barber 12.70% 286 82.15% 1,850 5.15% 116 2,252
Barton 17.91% 1,839 76.82% 7,888 5.27% 541 10,268
Bourbon 21.93% 1,336 72.61% 4,424 5.47% 333 6,093
Brown 21.38% 863 72.00% 2,906 6.62% 267 4,036
Butler 23.77% 6,573 68.96% 19,073 7.27% 2,011 27,657
Chase 23.08% 316 70.78% 969 6.14% 84 1,369
Chautauqua 13.30% 197 83.46% 1,236 3.24% 48 1,481
Cherokee 23.26% 2,005 71.72% 6,182 5.02% 433 8,620
Cheyenne 12.86% 181 83.37% 1,173 3.77% 53 1,407
Clark 11.94% 120 82.09% 825 5.97% 60 1,005
Clay 17.72% 677 75.68% 2,891 6.60% 252 3,820
Cloud 19.36% 761 74.27% 2,919 6.36% 250 3,930
Coffey 17.87% 727 74.98% 3,050 7.15% 291 4,068
Comanche 11.76% 102 82.47% 715 5.77% 50 867
Cowley 28.14% 3,551 65.53% 8,270 6.34% 800 12,621
Crawford 34.91% 5,199 57.91% 8,624 7.17% 1,068 14,891
Decatur 12.26% 178 83.33% 1,210 4.41% 64 1,452
Dickinson 19.60% 1,609 73.43% 6,029 6.97% 572 8,210
Doniphan 17.38% 587 77.15% 2,606 5.48% 185 3,378
Douglas 62.28% 31,195 29.32% 14,688 8.39% 4,204 50,087
Edwards 16.07% 212 78.62% 1,037 5.31% 70 1,319
Elk 12.71% 160 83.24% 1,048 4.05% 51 1,259
Ellis 22.95% 2,742 70.86% 8,466 6.19% 739 11,947
Ellsworth 19.45% 521 73.50% 1,969 7.05% 189 2,679
Finney 31.45% 3,195 62.51% 6,350 6.04% 614 10,159
Ford 27.84% 2,149 66.26% 5,114 5.90% 455 7,718
Franklin 26.37% 2,892 65.53% 7,185 8.10% 888 10,965
Geary 36.27% 2,722 56.96% 4,274 6.77% 508 7,504
Gove 11.09% 149 84.88% 1,140 4.02% 54 1,343
Graham 14.64% 188 79.83% 1,025 5.53% 71 1,284
Grant 18.46% 441 75.51% 1,804 6.03% 144 2,389
Gray 12.73% 263 82.19% 1,698 5.08% 105 2,066
Greeley 12.77% 83 82.15% 534 5.08% 33 650
Greenwood 17.08% 485 76.06% 2,160 6.87% 195 2,840
Hamilton 13.81% 121 80.48% 705 5.71% 50 876
Harper 15.24% 393 77.42% 1,996 7.33% 189 2,578
Harvey 33.98% 5,068 58.11% 8,668 7.91% 1,180 14,916
Haskell 18.09% 245 76.81% 1,040 5.10% 69 1,354
Hodgeman 12.19% 124 84.07% 855 3.74% 38 1,017
Jackson 25.99% 1,512 67.70% 3,939 6.31% 367 5,818
Jefferson 30.20% 2,518 62.53% 5,213 7.27% 606 8,337
Jewell 12.05% 180 81.86% 1,223 6.09% 91 1,494
Johnson 44.76% 129,852 47.40% 137,490 7.84% 22,748 290,090
Kearny 13.22% 174 81.69% 1,075 5.09% 67 1,316
Kingman 17.97% 599 75.88% 2,530 6.15% 205 3,334
Kiowa 10.57% 114 83.41% 900 6.02% 65 1,079
Labette 28.26% 2,291 65.81% 5,335 5.93% 481 8,107
Lane 12.17% 106 82.43% 718 5.40% 47 871
Leavenworth 33.69% 10,209 58.21% 17,638 8.10% 2,454 30,301
Lincoln 14.69% 215 80.53% 1,179 4.78% 70 1,464
Linn 16.63% 736 78.70% 3,484 4.68% 207 4,427
Logan 10.98% 149 83.42% 1,132 5.60% 76 1,357
Lyon 37.83% 4,649 53.32% 6,552 8.85% 1,087 12,288
Marion 21.41% 1,204 71.18% 4,003 7.41% 417 5,624
Marshall 22.94% 1,072 70.77% 3,307 6.29% 294 4,673
McPherson 25.32% 3,226 67.09% 8,549 7.59% 967 12,742
Meade 12.21% 210 82.27% 1,415 5.52% 95 1,720
Miami 26.57% 3,991 66.59% 10,003 6.84% 1,028 15,022
Mitchell 16.21% 477 78.45% 2,308 5.34% 157 2,942
Montgomery 21.97% 2,637 72.30% 8,679 5.73% 688 12,004
Morris 22.90% 601 69.36% 1,820 7.74% 203 2,624
Morton 12.33% 147 83.47% 995 4.19% 50 1,192
Nemaha 14.15% 725 80.52% 4,124 5.33% 273 5,122
Neosho 23.77% 1,501 70.18% 4,431 6.05% 382 6,314
Ness 11.14% 162 84.46% 1,228 4.40% 64 1,454
Norton 12.58% 281 82.36% 1,840 5.06% 113 2,234
Osage 24.88% 1,753 68.49% 4,826 6.63% 467 7,046
Osborne 13.03% 233 81.66% 1,460 5.31% 95 1,788
Ottawa 14.61% 424 78.64% 2,283 6.75% 196 2,903
Pawnee 21.76% 579 71.55% 1,904 6.69% 178 2,661
Phillips 11.26% 300 83.82% 2,233 4.92% 131 2,664
Pottawatomie 20.81% 2,225 71.19% 7,612 8.01% 856 10,693
Pratt 20.07% 771 73.87% 2,838 6.06% 233 3,842
Rawlins 11.07% 163 82.88% 1,220 6.05% 89 1,472
Reno 28.24% 6,837 64.08% 15,513 7.68% 1,860 24,210
Republic 14.83% 375 80.03% 2,024 5.14% 130 2,529
Rice 18.27% 695 74.58% 2,837 7.15% 272 3,804
Riley 43.38% 9,341 46.94% 10,107 9.68% 2,084 21,532
Rooks 11.37% 275 83.96% 2,031 4.67% 113 2,419
Rush 15.50% 233 79.64% 1,197 4.86% 73 1,503
Russell 14.44% 461 80.61% 2,574 4.95% 158 3,193
Saline 28.63% 6,317 62.67% 13,828 8.70% 1,919 22,064
Scott 10.72% 236 84.70% 1,865 4.59% 101 2,202
Sedgwick 36.88% 69,627 55.28% 104,353 7.84% 14,803 188,783
Seward 32.31% 1,628 62.70% 3,159 4.98% 251 5,038
Shawnee 44.99% 33,926 47.65% 35,934 7.35% 5,546 75,406
Sheridan 09.24% 127 87.12% 1,197 3.64% 50 1,374
Sherman 13.28% 347 79.98% 2,089 6.74% 176 2,612
Smith 14.54% 297 81.34% 1,661 4.11% 84 2,042
Stafford 16.03% 304 78.59% 1,490 5.38% 102 1,896
Stanton 18.05% 115 77.24% 492 4.71% 30 637
Stevens 11.63% 220 84.56% 1,599 3.81% 72 1,891
Sumner 21.35% 2,076 71.84% 6,984 6.81% 662 9,722
Thomas 13.23% 473 81.32% 2,908 5.45% 195 3,576
Trego 13.36% 198 82.79% 1,227 3.85% 57 1,482
Wabaunsee 22.96% 776 70.18% 2,372 6.86% 232 3,380
Wallace 05.76% 46 90.35% 721 3.88% 31 798
Washington 14.00% 387 79.35% 2,194 6.65% 184 2,765
Wichita 14.64% 140 80.44% 769 4.92% 47 956
Wilson 16.54% 594 77.64% 2,788 5.82% 209 3,591
Woodson 18.92% 273 74.98% 1,082 6.10% 88 1,443
Wyandotte 61.80% 30,146 32.40% 15,806 5.80% 2,829 48,781

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Kansas Election Results 2016 – The New York Times". Retrieved November 11, 2016.
  2. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/data.php?year=2016&def=swg&datatype=national&f=0&off=0&elect=0
  3. ^ "United States House of Representatives floor summary for Jan 8, 2009". Clerk.house.gov. Retrieved January 30, 2009.
  4. ^ "Federal elections 2008" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  5. ^ "President Map". The New York Times. November 29, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  6. ^ "Election Other – President Obama Job Approval". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved December 24, 2015.
  7. ^ Byrnes, Jesse (2016-06-15). "Poll: Obama approval rating highest since 2012". TheHill. Retrieved 2016-06-19.
  8. ^ Cohn, Nate (2015-01-19). "What a Rise in Obama's Approval Rating Means for 2016". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-06-19.
  9. ^ "Joe Biden Decides Not to Enter Presidential Race". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved October 21, 2015.
  10. ^ Kondik, Kyle; Sabato, Larry; Skelley, Geoffrey. "Clinton Rises to 348 Electoral Votes, Trump Drops to 190". Sabato's Crystal Ball. University of Virginia Center for Politics. Retrieved 22 August 2016.
  11. ^ http://www.sos.ks.gov/elections/16elec/2016_General_Election-Write-In_Presidential_Candidates.pdf
  12. ^ http://www.swingstateproject.com/diary/4161/

External linksEdit