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UCI Road World Championships – Men's time trial

The men's individual time trial event at the UCI Road World Championships is the men's world championship for the road bicycle racing discipline of time trial. Introduced in 1994 by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), the world's governing body of cycling, the event consists of a time trial covering a distance of approximately 45 kilometres (28 mi) over flat or rolling terrain.[1] Riders start separated by two-minute intervals; the one that completes the course in the shortest time is the winner, and is entitled to wear the rainbow jersey in time trial events for the forthcoming season.[2]

UCI Road World Championships – Men's time trial
Jersey rainbow chrono.svg
DateSeptember–October
DisciplineTime trial
TypeOne-day
OrganiserUnion Cycliste Internationale (UCI)
First edition1994 (1994)
Editions26 (as 2019)
First winner Chris Boardman (GBR)
Most wins
  •  Fabian Cancellara (SUI)
  •  Tony Martin (GER)

    4 times

Most recent Rohan Dennis (AUS)

Switzerland's Fabian Cancellara (2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010) and Germany's Tony Martin (2011, 2012, 2013 and 2016) have won the most competitions with four each. Australia's Michael Rogers (2003, 2004 and 2005) comes in next in terms of victories, with three wins; Rogers and Martin are the only people to take 3 wins in successive years.[3] Bradley Wiggins is the oldest winner; he was 34 years and 149 days old when he won in 2014. The youngest winner is Rogers; he was 23 years and 293 days old when he won in 2003.[4]

Germany's Michael Rich has finished second on three occasions, and is the most successful rider not to have won the event, with a total of four medals. Cancellara has the most third-place finishes, with three. German cyclists are the most successful, with seven victories; Swiss cyclists are second with five, and Australians are third with three. The current champion is Australian rider Rohan Dennis, who won the 2018 and 2019 events.[5]

HistoryEdit

Before 1994, the cyclists who performed well in the time trials during the three Grand Tours were considered the best in the world.[3] The first event, at the 1994 UCI Road World Championships in Agrigento, Italy, was won by British cyclist Chris Boardman, ahead of Italy's Andrea Chiurato. Tour de France winner Miguel Indurain won the event the following year, beating fellow Spaniard Abraham Olano by forty-nine seconds.[6] Alex Zülle, the 1996 Vuelta a España winner, won the rainbow jersey in his home country, ahead of Boardman and fellow Swiss cyclist Tony Rominger. The following year, Frenchman Laurent Jalabert beat Ukraine's Serhiy Honchar to the world title by three seconds in Valkenburg.[7] Olano won the event in 1998, beating his fellow Spaniard Melcior Mauri by thirty-seven seconds.[8]

Germany's Jan Ullrich won the event in 1999, beating Swedish rider Michael Andersson by fourteen seconds around the 50.8 kilometres (31.6 mi) course in Treviso.[9] Ullrich did not participate in the 2000 world championships in Plouay, and Honchar took the world title in his absence, beating Ullrich's countryman Michael Rich by ten seconds. The Ukrainian was happy to win the event after previous runner-up and third-place finishes: "I'm really satisfied, after the silver and bronze, I've finally got my World Championship."[10] Ullrich returned the following year and reclaimed the rainbow jersey, beating Britain's David Millar by six seconds in Lisbon.[11] Ullrich again decided against defending his title in 2002, leaving Santiago Botero to become the first Colombian to win a World Championship gold medal, as he beat Rich by eight seconds.[12] Millar won the event in 2003; however, he was stripped of the title a year later after being found guilty of doping. Second-placed Michael Rogers was subsequently awarded the victory.[13] He finished ahead of the next competitor, Uwe Peschel, by less than a second.[14]

Rogers retained the title the following two years, finishing a minute and twelve seconds ahead of Rich in 2004,[15] and twenty-three seconds ahead of Spain's Iván Gutiérrez in 2005.[16] Rogers's run came to an end the following year, as Switzerland's Fabian Cancellara secured the victory in Salzburg, one minute and eighteen seconds ahead of American rider David Zabriskie.[17] The Swiss defended his title in 2007, finishing ahead of Hungarian and Dutch cyclists László Bodrogi and Stef Clement.[18] Germany's Bert Grabsch succeeded Cancellara, who was absent from the 2008 event in Varese, winning the title ahead of Canada's Svein Tuft and Zabriskie.[19] Cancellara returned in 2009 and reclaimed the rainbow jersey after beating Sweden's Gustav Larsson and Germany's Tony Martin in Mendrisio.[20] He won the rainbow jersey for a record fourth time the following year, with Millar and Martin finishing second and third, respectively. Cancellara was unsure whether he would compete beforehand, but stated: "It's maybe the hardest of all my wins because leading up to this I wasn't sure of my condition."[21]

After two consecutive third-place finishes, Martin was victorious in 2011, beating Bradley Wiggins and defending champion Cancellara by a minute and fifteen seconds. He retained the rainbow jersey the following year; however, the margin of victory was considerably smaller as he beat the American Taylor Phinney by five seconds. In 2013, Martin won the event for a third consecutive time, again overcoming Wiggins and Cancellara. After two runner-up finishes, Wiggins prevented Martin's fourth successive win in the following season, taking the world title for the first time. Wiggins decided not to take part in 2015, focusing instead on breaking the hour record. In his absence, the winner was Belarussian cyclist Vasil Kiryienka, who came in third to Martin in 2012, beating Italy's Adriano Malori and France's Jérôme Coppel.[22]

Medal winnersEdit

Key
Year The year the competition was held
Margin The difference between the winner's time and those of the riders in second and third place
Distance The distance over which the race was held
Men's time trial medallists[23]
Year Gold Time Silver Margin Bronze Margin Distance Location Ref.
1994   Chris Boardman (GBR) 49' 34"   Andrea Chiurato (ITA) + 0' 48"   Jan Ullrich (GER) + 1' 51" 42.0 km (26.1 mi) Agrigento, Italy [24]
1995   Miguel Indurain (ESP) 55' 30"   Abraham Olano (ESP) + 0' 49"   Uwe Peschel (GER) + 2' 03" 43.0 km (26.7 mi) Duitama, Colombia [6]
1996   Alex Zülle (SUI) 48' 13"   Chris Boardman (GBR) + 0' 39"   Tony Rominger (SUI) + 0' 41" 40.4 km (25.1 mi) Lugano, Switzerland [25]
1997   Laurent Jalabert (FRA) 52' 01"   Serhiy Honchar (UKR) + 0' 03"   Chris Boardman (GBR) + 0' 20" 43.8 km (27.2 mi) San Sebastián, Spain [7]
1998   Abraham Olano (ESP) 54' 32"   Melchior Mauri (ESP) + 0' 37"   Serhiy Honchar (UKR) +0' 47" 43.5 km (27.0 mi) Valkenburg, Netherlands [8]
1999   Jan Ullrich (GER) 1h 00' 28"   Michael Andersson (SWE) + 0' 14"   Chris Boardman (GBR) + 0' 58" 50.8 km (31.6 mi) Treviso, Italy [9]
2000   Serhiy Honchar (UKR) 56' 21"   Michael Rich (GER) + 0' 10"   László Bodrogi (HUN) + 0' 24" 50.6 km (31.4 mi) Plouay, France [10]
2001   Jan Ullrich (GER) 51' 50"   David Millar (GBR) + 0' 06"   Santiago Botero (COL) + 0' 17" 38.7 km (24.0 mi) Lisbon, Portugal [11]
2002   Santiago Botero (COL) 48' 08"   Michael Rich (GER) + 0' 08"   Igor González de Galdeano (ESP) + 0' 17" 40.4 km (25.1 mi) Limburg, Belgium [12]
2003   Michael Rogers (AUS)[A] 52' 42"   Uwe Peschel (GER) + 0"[B]   Michael Rich (GER) + 0' 10" 48.3 km (30.0 mi) Hamilton, Canada [26]
2004   Michael Rogers (AUS) 57' 30"   Michael Rich (GER) + 1' 12"   Alexander Vinokourov (KAZ) + 1' 25" 46.7 km (29.0 mi) Verona, Italy [15]
2005   Michael Rogers (AUS) 53' 34"   Iván Gutiérrez (ESP) + 0' 23"   Fabian Cancellara (SUI) + 0' 23" 44.1 km (27.4 mi) Madrid, Spain [16]
2006   Fabian Cancellara (SUI) 1h 00' 11"   David Zabriskie (USA) + 1' 18"   Alexander Vinokourov (KAZ) + 1' 38" 50.8 km (31.6 mi) Salzburg, Austria [17]
2007   Fabian Cancellara (SUI) 55' 41"   László Bodrogi (HUN) + 0' 52"   Stef Clement (NED) + 0' 57" 44.9 km (27.9 mi) Stuttgart, Germany [18]
2008   Bert Grabsch (GER) 52' 01"   Svein Tuft (CAN) + 0' 42"   David Zabriskie (USA) + 0' 52" 43.7 km (27.2 mi) Varese, Italy [19]
2009   Fabian Cancellara (SUI) 57' 55"   Gustav Larsson (SWE) + 1' 27"   Tony Martin (GER) + 2' 30" 49.8 km (30.9 mi) Mendrisio, Switzerland [20]
2010   Fabian Cancellara (SUI) 58' 09"   David Millar (GBR) + 1' 02"   Tony Martin (GER) + 1' 12" 45.6 km (28.3 mi) Geelong, Australia [21]
2011   Tony Martin (GER) 53' 43"   Bradley Wiggins (GBR) + 1' 15"   Fabian Cancellara (SUI) + 1' 20" 46.4 km (28.8 mi) Copenhagen, Denmark [27]
2012   Tony Martin (GER) 58' 38"   Taylor Phinney (USA) + 0' 05"   Vasil Kiryienka (BLR) + 1' 44" 46.2 km (28.7 mi) Limburg, Netherlands [28]
2013   Tony Martin (GER) 1h 05' 36"   Bradley Wiggins (GBR) + 0' 46"   Fabian Cancellara (SUI) + 0' 48" 57.9 km (36.0 mi) Tuscany, Italy [29]
2014   Bradley Wiggins (GBR) 56' 25"   Tony Martin (GER) + 0' 26"   Tom Dumoulin (NED) + 0' 40" 47.1 km (29.3 mi) Ponferrada, Spain [30]
2015   Vasil Kiryienka (BLR) 1h 02' 29"   Adriano Malori (ITA) + 0' 09"   Jérôme Coppel (FRA) + 0' 26" 53.0 km (32.9 mi) Richmond, Virginia, United States [22]
2016   Tony Martin (GER) 44' 42"   Vasil Kiryienka (BLR) + 0' 45"   Jonathan Castroviejo (ESP) + 1' 10" 40.0 km (24.9 mi) Doha, Qatar [31]
2017   Tom Dumoulin (NED) 44' 41"   Primož Roglič (SLO) + 0' 57"   Chris Froome (GBR) + 1' 21" 31.0 km (19.3 mi) Bergen, Norway [32]
2018   Rohan Dennis (AUS) 1h 03' 45"   Tom Dumoulin (NED) + 1' 21"   Victor Campenaerts (BEL) + 1' 22" 52.2 km (32.4 mi) Innsbruck, Austria [33]
2019   Rohan Dennis (AUS) 1h 05' 05"   Remco Evenepoel (BEL) + 1' 08"   Filippo Ganna (ITA) + 1' 55" 54.0 km (33.6 mi) Yorkshire, United Kingdom [34]

Most successful cyclistsEdit

The most successful cyclists are listed below and ranked by in order gold, silver and bronze medals won.

Most successful men's time trial cyclists
Rank Cyclist Gold Silver Bronze Total
1   Tony Martin (GER) 4 1 2 7
2   Fabian Cancellara (SUI) 4 0 3 7
3   Michael Rogers (AUS) 3 0 0 3
4   Jan Ullrich (GER) 2 0 1 3
5   Rohan Dennis (AUS) 2 0 0 2
6   Bradley Wiggins (GBR) 1 2 0 3
7   Chris Boardman (GBR) 1 1 2 4
8   Serhiy Honchar (UKR) 1 1 1 3
  Vasil Kiryienka (BLR) 1 1 1 3
  Tom Dumoulin (NED) 1 1 1 3

Medallists by nationEdit

Nations are ranked in order of number of gold, silver and bronze medals won.

Men's time trial medallists by nation
Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1   Germany 7 5 5 17
2    Switzerland 5 0 4 9
3   Australia 5 0 0 5
4   Great Britain 2 5 3 10
5   Spain 2 3 2 7
6   Netherlands 1 1 2 4
7   Belarus 1 1 1 3
  Ukraine 1 1 1 3
9   Colombia 1 0 1 2
  France 1 0 1 2
11   United States 0 2 1 3
  Italy 0 2 1 3
13   Sweden 0 2 0 2
14   Belgium 0 1 1 2
  Hungary 0 1 1 2
16   Canada 0 1 0 1
  Slovenia 0 1 0 1
18   Kazakhstan 0 0 2 2

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ David Millar was the winner of the 2003 event in Hamilton, but was subsequently found to have tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs. The Court of Arbitration for Sport found him guilty of using erythropoietin during the time trial and stripped him of his title on 4 August 2004.[13]
  2. ^ Rogers finished 0' 00" 56"' ahead of Peschel.[14]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "UCI Road World Championships – Information for Organisers" (PDF). Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI). p. 8. Retrieved 17 January 2016.
  2. ^ "UCI Road World Championships – The magical rainbow jersey". Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI). 9 September 2015. Retrieved 17 January 2016.
  3. ^ a b "UCI World Championships: the experts against the clock". Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI). 15 September 2015. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
  4. ^ "Oldest winners". Pro Cycling Stats. Retrieved 9 March 2016.
  5. ^ "Road World Championships: Rohan Dennis defends time trial title". BBC Sport. 25 September 2019.
  6. ^ a b "World Championships – ITT (43km) 4 Oct 95". Cycling News. 4 October 1995. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  7. ^ a b "World Road Cycling Championships, San Sebastian". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  8. ^ a b "Elite Men's Individual Time Trial, 43.5 kms". Cycling News. 8 October 1998. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  9. ^ a b Maloney, Tim (7 October 1999). "Jan the Man comes through". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  10. ^ a b Maloney, Tim (12 October 2000). "Hontchar Honch against the watch; Olano bombs again". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  11. ^ a b Maloney, Tim (11 October 2001). "Ullrich surges to Elite TT victory". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  12. ^ a b Jones, Jeff (10 October 2002). "Botero gives Colombia its first World title". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  13. ^ a b "Millar banned for two years". BBC Sport. 4 August 2004. Retrieved 9 June 2015.
  14. ^ a b "Millar wins world title". BBC Sport. 9 October 2003. Retrieved 9 March 2016.
  15. ^ a b Maloney, Tim (29 September 2004). "Mick makes it real this time". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  16. ^ a b Stokes, Shane; Macias, Herman Alvarez (22 September 2005). "Three for Rogers". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  17. ^ a b Kröner, Hedwig (21 September 2006). "Fabian the superman". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  18. ^ a b Brown, Gregor (27 September 2007). "Cancellara reigns as World Champion". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  19. ^ a b Westemayer, Susan (25 September 2008). "Grabsch grabs title". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  20. ^ a b "Time Trial Men Elite Results". Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI). 24 September 2009. Archived from the original on 24 September 2009.
  21. ^ a b "Fabian Cancellara beats David Millar to time trial gold". BBC Sport. 30 September 2010. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  22. ^ a b "Kiryienka wins individual time trial World Championship". Cycling News. 24 September 2015. Archived from the original on 9 December 2015. Retrieved 24 December 2015.
  23. ^ "UCI Road World Championships, Men Elite – Individual time trial" (PDF). Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI). Retrieved 21 September 2015.
  24. ^ "World Championships Time Trial 1994". Pro Cycling Stats. Retrieved 13 August 2015.
  25. ^ "World Cycling Championships, Switzerland Mens ITT". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  26. ^ Zalewski, Mark (9 October 2003). "Millar realises a dream". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  27. ^ Williams, Ollie (21 September 2011). "Bradley Wiggins wins time trial silver". BBC Sport. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  28. ^ "Road World Championships: Tony Martin retains time trial title". BBC Sport. 19 September 2012. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  29. ^ Benson, Daniel (25 September 2013). "Tony Martin wins elite men's time trial world championship". Cycling News. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  30. ^ Fotheringham, William (24 September 2014). "Bradley Wiggins wins gold in time trial at Road World Championships". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 30 September 2014.
  31. ^ Farrand, Stephen (12 October 2016). "Tony Martin wins individual time trial World Championship". Cycling News. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  32. ^ Farrand, Stephen (20 September 2017). "Dumoulin makes history as first Dutch men's time trial world champion". Cycling News. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  33. ^ Ryan, Barry (26 September 2018). "Rohan Dennis wins time trial world title". Cycling News. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  34. ^ Farrand, Stephen (25 September 2019). "Dennis defends elite men's individual time trial". Cycling News. Retrieved 25 September 2019.