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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Munich, Germany.

Contents

Prior to 17th centuryEdit

17th-18th centuriesEdit

19th centuryEdit

See also: Timeline of Munich/1801–1900 (in German)

20th centuryEdit

See also: Timeline of Munich/1901–2000 (in German)

1900-1945Edit

 
Sterneckerbräu, where Hitler attended his first German Workers' Party meeting on 12 September 1919 (photo 1925).[18]

1946-1990sEdit

21st centuryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Baedeker 1887.
  2. ^ a b c d e Townsend 1877.
  3. ^ Melitta Weiss Adamson (2004). "Timeline". Food in Medieval Times. Greenwood. ISBN 978-0-313-32147-4.
  4. ^ Henri Bouchot (1890). "Topographical index of the principal towns where early printing presses were established". In H. Grevel (ed.). The book: its printers, illustrators, and binders, from Gutenberg to the present time. London: H. Grevel & Co.
  5. ^ Georg Michael Pachtler (1890). "Chronologie der Stiftung von Kollegien S.J. innerhalb des alten deutschen Reiches und Belgiens (Chronology of Jesuit colleges in the old German Empire and Belgium)". Monumenta Germaniae Paedagogica (in German). 9. Berlin: A. Hofmann & Comp.
  6. ^ Overall 1870.
  7. ^ a b Claude Egerton Lowe (1896). "Chronological Summary of the Chief Events in the History of Music". Chronological Cyclopædia of Musicians and Musical Events. London: Weekes & Co.
  8. ^ a b c d Ursula Heinzelmann (2008). "Timeline". Food Culture in Germany. Greenwood Press. ISBN 978-0-313-34495-4.
  9. ^ Wadleigh 1910.
  10. ^ Alte Pinakothek (Munich, Germany) (1890), Catalogue of the paintings in the Old Pinakothek, Munich, Munich: Printed by Knorr & Hirth, OCLC 15988645
  11. ^ a b "Geschichte der Staatssammlung". München: Bayerische Staatssammlung für Paläontologie und Geologie. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  12. ^ Florence Jean Ansell (1910), The art of the Munich galleries, Boston: L.C. Page & Company
  13. ^ Georg Friedrich Kolb [de] (1862). "Deutschland: Bayern". Grundriss der Statistik der Völkerzustands- und Staatenkunde (in German). Leipzig: A. Förstnersche Buchhandlung.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  14. ^ a b c d e Brockhaus 1896.
  15. ^ Bruckmann 1914.
  16. ^ A.J. Mackintosh (1907). "Mountaineering Clubs, 1857-1907". Alpine Journal. UK (177).
  17. ^ a b Patrick Robertson (2011). Robertson's Book of Firsts. Bloomsbury. ISBN 978-1-60819-738-5.
  18. ^ David T. Zabecki (2015). "Chronology of World War II in Europe". World War II in Europe: An Encyclopedia. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-135-81242-3.
  19. ^ a b c Chris Michaelides, ed. (2007). "Chronology of the European Avant Garde, 1900─1937". Breaking the Rules: The Printed Face of the European Avant Garde 1900-1937. Online Exhibitions. British Library.
  20. ^ Munich. Schackgalerie (1911), Schack Gallery in Munich, Munich: [G. Hirth]
  21. ^ "Germany: Principal Towns". Statesman's Year-Book. London: Macmillan and Co. 1921 – via HathiTrust.
  22. ^ "Germany Profile: Timeline". BBC News. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  23. ^ Richard Overy, ed. (2013). New York Times Book of World War II 1939-1945. USA: Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers. ISBN 978-1-60376-377-6.
  24. ^ "Cases: Germany". Global Nonviolent Action Database. Pennsylvania, USA: Swarthmore College. Retrieved 3 December 2013.
  25. ^ Rosenfeld 2000.
  26. ^ Tom Dunmore (2011). "Chronology". Historical Dictionary of Soccer. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-7188-5.
  27. ^ Ossama Hegazy (2015). "Towards a German Mosque". In Erkan Toğuşlu (ed.). Everyday Life Practices of Muslims in Europe. Leuven University Press. pp. 193–216. ISBN 978-94-6270-032-1.
  28. ^ "Bisherige Gartenschauen" [Previous Garden Shows] (in German). Bonn: Deutsche Bundesgartenschau-Gesellschaft. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  29. ^ "Cincinnati USA Sister City Association". USA. Archived from the original on 19 May 2013.
  30. ^ "Landeshauptstadt München" (in German). Archived from the original on September 13, 2002 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  31. ^ "Tausende Flüchtlinge erreichen Bayern: München ist da" [Thousands of refugees reach Bavaria], Der Spiegel (in German), 1 September 2015
This article incorporates information from the German Wikipedia.

BibliographyEdit

in EnglishEdit

in GermanEdit

External linksEdit