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Tanta (Egyptian Arabic: طنطا‎‎ Ṭanṭa  pronounced [ˈtˤɑntˤɑ], is a large city in Egypt. It is the country's fifth largest populated area, with 421,076 inhabitants as of 2006.[1] Tanta is located between Cairo and Alexandria: 94 km (58 mi) north of Cairo and 130 km (81 mi) southeast of Alexandria. The capital of Gharbia Governorate,[2] it is a center for the cotton-ginning industry.[3] One of the major railway lines goes through Tanta.[4][5] Three annual festivals are held in Tanta in honor of Ahmad al-Badawi, a revered Sufi figure of the 13th century, who founded the Badawiyya Tariqa in Egypt and is buried in the main mosque of Tanta. Tanta is known for its sweets shops and roasted chickpeas.[6]

Tanta, Egypt
طنطا
City
Tanta-0.jpg
Nickname(s): El Badawy City
Tanta, Egypt is located in Egypt
Tanta, Egypt
Tanta, Egypt
Location in Egypt
Coordinates: 30°47′N 31°0′E / 30.783°N 31.000°E / 30.783; 31.000Coordinates: 30°47′N 31°0′E / 30.783°N 31.000°E / 30.783; 31.000
Country  Egypt
Governorate Gharbia
Elevation 12 m (39 ft)
Population (2006)
 • Total 421,076
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
Area code(s) (+20) 40

Contents

OverviewEdit

 
'hubb el 'Aziz' ('seeds of the Beloved Prophet'

With its large cotton plantations, in 1856, Tanta became a stop on the railway network, primarily for the benefit of exporting its cotton to European markets.[7] Even by 1986 the area around Tanta was mostly open fields with scattered villages but by 2001, Tanta had grown into a large, busy city.[8]

Tanta is known for its sweets, eaten mostly when large numbers of Egyptians descend upon on the city, during the mulid (Arabic: المولد‎‎) festivals.[9][10]

This city comes to life in late October at the end of the cotton harvest. Three million people,[2] from around the Delta and other parts of the Arab world, come for the Moulid of Sayid Ahmed el-Badawi,[11] which is a colorful,[12] religious, eight-day celebration. The moulid is centered around the mosque and tomb of Sayid Ahmad al-Badawi.[13] He founded one of Egypt's largest Sufi orders called Ahmadiyyah or Badawiyya.[14] He was born in Morocco, but emigrated to Arabia and was sent to Tanta in 1234 as a representative of the order from Iraq. He was given permission to start a new order in Tanta and it soon flourished into "one of Egypt's largest Sufi brotherhoods".[11] During the festival many sugar-coated nuts called 'hubb el 'Aziz' ('seeds of the Beloved Prophet') are eaten. They have been considered a delicacy since the 1800s.[15]

Tanta has cotton ginning factories and textile industries,[11] and is also a university town with Tanta University since 1972.[16]

The people of Tanta are called Tantawy and enjoy leisurely walks along the streets.[17][10]

Art, and cultureEdit

What originally began in Cairo, spread to Tanta when a group of young Egyptians began showing European movie screenings at Rivoli Cinema, the oldest cinema in Tanta. Called the 8th Edition Panorama of European Films, the young media students invited a film director to speak with the audience: people were enticed and the film screenings became a huge success. The group also began the Association of Cinema and Literature Lovers Group to encourage young filmmakers in Tanta.[18]

OrganizationsEdit

Tanta Sporting Club: It is An Egyptian Sports Club Based In Tanta, Egypt. Mohamed Saied Basha Founded Tanta Sporting Club In July 1932, As A Gathering Place For Tanta 's professionals. The Club's First President was Mohamed Saied Basha. First, it named Municipality Club, In 1936 after the King Farouk visited the club, it called First Foaud King Club. After the 1952 revolution, it called Tanta Sporting Club. The Club activities include social events and sports activities. Social activities include meeting areas for all the members, playground for children, Theater, Library, and restaurant. The sports activities include soccer ball, basketball, Swimming, and Tennis.[1]

There is a Young Men's Muslim Association (YMMA) in Tanta and in 1994 had about 1000 members.[19]

Telecom Egypt, the main telephone landline Egyptian company, has one of its main centers in Tanta.[20]

SitesEdit

St. Mary Coptic Orthodox church, which is over 200 years old, is located in Tanta. Some people believe that the icon of the Virgin Mary has healing powers.[21][22] The Museum of Tanta contains items from ancient nearby sites of Sais, Naucratis, and Buto, such as pottery and statues.[23][24] El Mahallah is a large industrial town near Tanta, famous for its textile.[11]

ClimateEdit

As all of Egypt, has a hot desert climate (BWh), according to Köppen-Geiger climate classification system.

Climate data for Tanta, Egypt
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 29.2
(84.6)
32
(90)
36.8
(98.2)
41.6
(106.9)
45.3
(113.5)
44.7
(112.5)
41.5
(106.7)
42.5
(108.5)
41.2
(106.2)
38.7
(101.7)
35.6
(96.1)
28.2
(82.8)
45.3
(113.5)
Average high °C (°F) 18.7
(65.7)
19.4
(66.9)
22.1
(71.8)
27.1
(80.8)
31
(88)
33.6
(92.5)
33.1
(91.6)
32.7
(90.9)
31.6
(88.9)
29.2
(84.6)
24.2
(75.6)
20.3
(68.5)
26.9
(80.4)
Daily mean °C (°F) 12
(54)
12.8
(55)
14.5
(58.1)
18.4
(65.1)
22.1
(71.8)
25.4
(77.7)
26
(79)
25.8
(78.4)
24.2
(75.6)
21.6
(70.9)
17.5
(63.5)
13.5
(56.3)
19.5
(67.1)
Average low °C (°F) 6.5
(43.7)
6.6
(43.9)
7.8
(46)
11.2
(52.2)
14.3
(57.7)
17.3
(63.1)
19.7
(67.5)
19.7
(67.5)
17.8
(64)
15.3
(59.5)
11.5
(52.7)
8
(46)
13.0
(55.4)
Record low °C (°F) 0.2
(32.4)
0.4
(32.7)
0.8
(33.4)
4.6
(40.3)
8.3
(46.9)
12
(54)
14.8
(58.6)
16.4
(61.5)
13.7
(56.7)
9.1
(48.4)
5
(41)
1.6
(34.9)
0.2
(32.4)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 13
(0.51)
8
(0.31)
7
(0.28)
3
(0.12)
2
(0.08)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
2
(0.08)
4
(0.16)
12
(0.47)
51
(2.01)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm) 1.7 0.9 0.9 0.5 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.6 1.5 6.6
Average relative humidity (%) 72 69 68 60 57 58 66 71 69 67 70 71 66.5
Mean monthly sunshine hours 205.6 198.8 256.7 280.3 325.1 357.9 332.6 342.8 280.5 278.0 229.7 205.3 3,293.3
Source #1: NOAA[25]
Source #2: Record Meteo for record temperatures (1961–1990)[26]

Notable peopleEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ World Gazetteer. "Statistical information on Tanta, Egypt". Archived from the original on 8 December 2012. Retrieved 2016-11-14. 
  2. ^ a b Raafat, Shaimaa (October 21, 2014). "Tanta receives 3 million visitors participating in Moulid Al-Sayed Al-Badawy festival". Daily News Egypt. Archived from the original on 17 November 2016. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  3. ^ Chaichian, Mohammad A. (2009). Town and Country in the Middle East: Iran and Egypt in the Transition to Globalization, 1800-1970. Lexington Books. ISBN 9780739126776. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  4. ^ Ayyad, Mohamed (July 27, 2015). "Siemens, Egyptian Railway sign MoU to develop major lines’ sign lighting". Daily News Egypt. Archived from the original on 17 November 2016. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  5. ^ Seif, Ola R (October 12, 2015). "Train of thoughts". ahram online. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  6. ^ Dan, Richardson; Jacobs, Daniel (February 1, 2013). The Rough Guide to Egypt. Penguin. ISBN 9781409324263. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  7. ^ Chaichian, Mohammad A. (2009). Town and Country in the Middle East: Iran and Egypt in the Transition to Globalization, 1800-1970. Lexington Books. p. 131. ISBN 9780739126776. Retrieved 18 November 2016. 
  8. ^ Huston, Perdita (2001). Families as We are: Conversations from Around the World. Feminist Press at CUNY. ISBN 9781558612501. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  9. ^ Marcus, Antoine. "A Glimpse of Tanta, Egypt’s "Boss Town"". Egyptian Streets. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Elsamadouny, Zeyad. "Night Ride in Tanta". Youtube. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  11. ^ a b c d Richadson, Dan; Jacobs, Daniel (August 2, 2010). The Rough Guide to Egypt. Penguin. ISBN 9781405387736. 
  12. ^ Denny, Frederick (September 21, 2015). Introduction to Islam. Routledge. p. 245. ISBN 9781317347279. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  13. ^ Brockman, Norbert. Encyclopedia of Sacred Places, Volume 1. p. 321. ISBN 9781598846546. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  14. ^ el-Aswad, El-Sayed (July 13, 2012). Muslim Worldviews and Everyday Lives. Rowman Altamira. p. 77. ISBN 9780759121195. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  15. ^ Karl, Baedeker (1885). Egypt: Handbook for Travellers : Part First, Lower Egypt, with the Fayum and the Peninsula of Sinai. Harvard: Karl Baedeker. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  16. ^ "Tanta University History". Tanta University. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  17. ^ Marcus, Antoine. "A Glimpse of Tanta, Egypt’s "Boss Town"". Egyptian Streets. Archived from the original on 11 October 2016. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  18. ^ Nasr, Nahed (30 October 2016). "Archives: 8th Panorama out of Cairo: A dream in fulfilment". ahram online. Archived from the original on 17 November 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  19. ^ Sullivan, Denis Joseph (1994). Private Voluntary Organizations in Egypt: Islamic Development, Private Initiative, and State Control. University Press of Florida. p. 73. ISBN 9780813012902. 
  20. ^ CIA, United States. The CIA World Factbook 2010, Book 2010. Skyhorse Publishing Inc. ISBN 9781602397279. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  21. ^ "Christianity in Ebiar Village Tanta". A Sense of Belonging. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  22. ^ "St. Mary Coptic Orthodox Church Tanta". St. Mary Coptic Orthodox Church Tanta. Archived from the original on 17 November 2016. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  23. ^ "SCA Tanta Museum". Supreme Council of Antiquities. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  24. ^ Hudson, Kenneth; Nicholls, Ann (June 18, 1985). The Directory of Museums & Living Displays. Springer. p. 208. ISBN 9781349070145. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  25. ^ "Tanta Climate Normals 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved January 25, 2015. 
  26. ^ "Tanta, Egypt weather Station Record Meteo". Record Meteo. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  27. ^ "Kamal Amien Bio". Fine Art Gov Egypt. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  28. ^ "Khairy Beshara Biography". IMDB. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 14 November 2016. 
  29. ^ "‘Abduh al-Ḥāmūlī". Foundation for Arab Music Archiving & Research. Retrieved 14 November 2016. 
  30. ^ "Mahmoud Khalil Al Hussary". Assabile. Archived from the original on 19 November 2016. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  31. ^ "Mohamed Fawzy (1918 - 1966) محمد فوزي". El Cinema. Archived from the original on 16 November 2016. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  32. ^ "Naima Akef". IMDB. Archived from the original on 18 February 2017. Retrieved 14 November 2016. 
  33. ^ Smith, Bonnie G. (2008). The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History: 4 Volume Set. Oxford University Press, USA. p. 27. ISBN 9780195148909. 
  34. ^ Mahmoud, Sayed (October 24, 2011). "Hegazy, Master of Egyptian cartoons". ahram online. Archived from the original on 16 November 2016. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  35. ^ "Professor Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd". Philosophers of the Arabs. Archived from the original on 17 November 2016. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  36. ^ Yaqoob, Tahira (March 16, 2012). "Ahmed Khaled Towfik, Egypt's doctor of escapism". Archived from the original on 17 November 2016. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  37. ^ "Amina Rizk". IMDB. Archived from the original on 15 February 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  38. ^ "Sayed Nossier". SR / Olympic Sports. Archived from the original on 2015-02-20. 
  39. ^ "Patriarch Maximos V (George) Hakim †". Catholic Hierarchy. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 
  40. ^ "Dr. Nabil Farouk Biography". Rewayat Club. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  41. ^ Almazroui, Ayesha (March 8, 2015). "If we want to keep Arabic alive, don’t blame English". The National. Archived from the original on 16 November 2016. Retrieved 15 November 2016. 
  42. ^ "Bishop Paula of Tanta and Synod Member speaks to Al-Hayat TV Channel on Egyptian Copts, relations with Al-Sisi and patriotism". Middle East Monitor. June 11, 2014. Retrieved 17 November 2016. 

External linksEdit