Talk:Pennybacker Bridge

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ClarificationEdit

The article says, "At the time of its construction, it was only the second bridge of its design in the world." There are a number of previous Compression arch suspended-deck bridges, e.g. Bayonne, Hell Gate, Sydney, Hernando de Soto etc., so this must refer to something less obvious (at least, less obvious to this reader). Can someone clarify what this means? -- Gyrofrog (talk) 00:37, 23 January 2009 (UTC)

I don't know why it says that. That sounds like something from a Highway Department brochure - bragging and inaccurate. I have noted in the article that this is a "through arch bridge" and linked that article, and listed this bridge in that article. I'd remove the "only the second bridge of its design" statement if I knew that it was false, but there are no references and there might be something unique about this bridge. 24.27.31.170 (talk) 05:08, 19 March 2012 (UTC) Eric

The article currently states that the bridge is made of 600,000,000 lbs of steel. It is likely that the bridge is composed of far less steel than that. For one, the spot price of steel is usually in the hundreds of dollars per metric ton, meaning that the cost of the steel would be in the hundreds of millions. The page lists the cost of the bridge as being $10 million. 66.112.249.122 (talk) 03:23, 1 March 2009 (UTC)

Following up on the previous comment, the first external reference lists the weight of steel at 600 tons, which is 1,200,000 lbs. of steel. This incorrect information has been quoted in numerous other articles on the bridge which sourced their material from here. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.210.43.150 (talk) 20:52, 8 August 2013 (UTC)