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Talk:Padua

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I hope economic description is expanded. To me putting a 13 employees artisan workshop sounds like mere advertisement and I have doubts it was posted by someone who has no interest.

i was reading this article just to see what is written about my city. the whole article is really well done. but here in the "austrian section" are described those "Clowns of Padua" and a phantomatic "Viggio". obviously nobody knows him nor them. nobody is killed or injured. this is a evident fake. just check the web: nowhere there is any infos about this. clowns and geeks? never heard.

and i have to add: Lega Nord never reached 5% of vote in Padua: so why to say they have an office?? maybe they have one in london too, so what?. And i have never heard of a single "hate crime" in my city. there was a shooting 3 years ago, no foreing involved.


I'll go on record too as saying that any hate crimes may well be justified with ideas like those of Lega Nord, but I seriously doubt that they are actually behind them in any way. People in Padova are generally distrustful of foreigners, and even Italians of other regions. As a foreigner, when I called around to rent a place, people always (rudely) asked me where I was from before telling me anything else (even though it is theoretically illegal to discriminate on the basis of national origin in Italy).


house renters are quite (in)famous. but they act in the same way to any university student. but theese are bad housing politics, not "hate crimes", isn't it? (hey: isn't just the same in the whole europe??) i'm a enemy of lega nord, but my impression is that abroad you did not get the point. actually house renters in the centre of the city are surely NOT lega nord voters... (more probably they are Berlusconi's or post-fascist Alleanza Nazionale voters, while in the most of the city voters are for centre-left parties). anyway it is difficult to state that there is any violence, compared - let's say - Liverpool, Bruxelles or Paris.

Padua linkEdit

Padua redirects here. Now, what other Padua might be the article likely to be sought by the average reader? Padua, Illinois? Padua, Minnesota? Couldn't this article be simply Padua without offending mid-America? Wikipedia tends to reveal its early bias. --Wetman 09:23, 2 January 2006 (UTC)

Pianura Padovana or Pianura Padana?Edit

I remember reading the latter more than the former. Which is commonly used today? Jorge Stolfi 18:58, 31 January 2006 (UTC)

The correct one is Pianura Padana and it indicates the whole of the Northern Italy's plane. Pianura Padovana does not exist, although the eastern part of the Pianura Padana is also called Pianura Veneta, since it includes the Veneto region.

Right, I live in Padova, and nobody knows what is "pianura padovana", but pianura padana.

Pronunciation of "Padova'Edit

In works of geographic reference (such as the maps and guides of the Touring Club of Italy), the practice is to indicate the stress accent on all placenames which do not have it on the penult (next-to-last syllable), or which end in -ia. Pàdova is a typical example. It is not incorrect to write the accent -- it is just not usually done. I suppose IPA is the other way to do it, but why not use the standard Italian convention? I won't revert this change, because I think there is room for discussion. --Macrakis 20:17, 31 January 2006 (UTC)

My worry is that Italian speakers don't need the accent, while non-speakers, who do not know that convention, may think that the accent is mandatory (as it is in some Italian words). Jorge Stolfi 08:11, 1 February 2006 (UTC)
I have written some notes on User talk:Macrakis/Italian accents (perhaps there is a better place to put this?). To answer directly here, it is not wrong to write the accent. --Macrakis 15:26, 1 February 2006 (UTC)

Capitalization of "patavium"Edit

As for the capitalization of "Patavium", yes, the Romans did not distinguish capitals and smalls, but all Roman (and for that matter Greek, Arabic, Ottoman, etc. names originally written without capital/small distinctions) names in Wikipedia are written using the modern conventions. Surely we are not going to start writing ROMA, ΑΘΗΝΑΙ, AL-QUDS, etc. I am reverting this change. --Macrakis 20:17, 31 January 2006 (UTC)

Nolo contendere, after all the word is indeed capitalized in many Latin texts. But... I think that there is a distinction between (1) the headword of an article and its variants, as it may be used in an English text about the subject; and (2) the native-language version of the headword, as it would be used in a native-language text, and which is being given only for information. In case (1) the English capitalization should certainly be used, even if the headword is an unassimilated foreign word, such as Gallia Cisalpina. In case (2) the word should be written in the native alphabet (with Latin-script transcription and/or IPA if appropriate), as it would appear in native-language texts. Methinks that in this case onse should use the native capitalization too, that's all... Jorge Stolfi 08:11, 1 February 2006 (UTC)
Can you find any scholarly articles or encyclopedias which follow this convention for Latin place-names? --Macrakis 15:13, 1 February 2006 (UTC)
OK, forget it. Peace and love, Jorge Stolfi 23:16, 1 February 2006 (UTC)


Dead linkEdit

During several automated bot runs the following external link was found to be unavailable. Please check if the link is in fact down and fix or remove it in that case!


maru (talk) contribs 04:42, 27 July 2006 (UTC)

It's Padua, not "Padua, Italy"Edit

Since in this case there isn't a US Padua at all, the sensible title is simply Padua. Would there be any reason to object? --Wetman 07:22, 28 October 2006 (UTC)

No objection! On the contrary it would restore the accuracy of the hundreds of links which are now pointing at a disambig page. —Ian Spackman 17:40, 28 October 2006 (UTC)
I agree. This is the original and most well-known Padua, and the extra ", Italy" to disambiguate is not necessary. --Schzmo 22:09, 20 December 2006 (UTC)
I tried:
(cur) (last) 22:46, 9 February 2006 Tangerine Cossack (Talk | contribs) m (moved Padua, Italy to Padua: Remove bogus disambiguation.)
but somebody moved it back. Tangerine Cossack 20:43, 23 December 2006 (UTC)
There are two places called Padua in the United States, but that doesn't mean this can't be the primary topic. Dekimasuよ! 08:08, 26 July 2007 (UTC)

A new effort for PaduaEdit

The following discussion is an archived discussion of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the proposal was move the page from Padua, Italy to Padua, per the discussion below. Dekimasuよ! 08:06, 26 July 2007 (UTC)


I'm starting a request for an administrative move for this article since the above attempts obviously didn't work out for very long.

My rationale for this move is that this city in Italy is by far the most famous use of the word and further what is most likely meant by a link to Padua. Even this very talk page is located simply at Talk:Padua. The two small American cities named Padua are listed on a disambiguation page linked to at the top of the Padua article.

This move brings the name of this article in line with other cities in Italy, such as Milan, Lucca, Venice, Rome, Parma and Florence. --Bennyfactor 20:55, 21 July 2007 (UTC)

  • Support per nomination. —  AjaxSmack  01:27, 22 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Hopeless See Talk:Syracuse, Sicily. --Wetman 06:49, 22 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Support This is in a different league altogether than the situation with Syracuse. As far as I can tell, there is nothing else on the disambiguation page that is commonly known only as "Padua" that even comes close to the Italian city (except perhaps confusion between the Province/City -- but that can be addressed in the article as it is for other such formations). olderwiser 14:18, 22 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Support per last. It is totally the primary usage. And we need to assume (as the great majority of readers will, and the tiny majority won’t be lost for long) that someone looking for Padua, Rome or Florence is looking for the city not the province. [We don’t want to have Turin, Milan, Siena, Naples and more than a hundred others as disambiguation pages or redirects. Or do we? Do we want to make life that hard for editors?] —Ian Spackman 13:53, 22 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Support, obviously. Only abismal ignorance of western culture could compare Padua, Italy (city) with any other usage of the name. --Attilios 19:14, 22 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Support. No reason not to move it. Padua already redirects to Padua, Italy. ●DanMSTalk 20:30, 22 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Support use of simple name for something that is clearly the primary topic, as evidenced by the existing redirect from the simple name. --Polaron | Talk 05:17, 24 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Support per other European primary names. For what it is worth, I also support simple Syracuse; the present placement is really annoying in writing Greek history. Septentrionalis PMAnderson 16:21, 24 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Concur; this half-and-half situation makes no sense, and the disambiguation isn't needed; retain the former as a redir to the latter. — SMcCandlish [talk] [cont] ‹(-¿-)› 23:17, 25 July 2007 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

New picturesEdit

have substituted 2 pictures. the older are: Image:Basilika des hl. Antonius.JPG Image:Padova-Basilika der hl. Justina.jpg

Wrong mapEdit

On the map of Italy is shown Rovigo not Padua.--Epavanel 11:36, 4 December 2007 (UTC)

PatronEdit

Padova has four patrons: St. Anthony (Best known) Santa Giustina (Born in Padua) San Prosdocimo (First bishop of Padua) San Daniele (Buried in Padua) --Epavanel (talk) 15:53, 19 December 2007 (UTC)

Still no citations on the Basilica di Sant'Antonio being "treated as Vatican territory"Edit

Whatever does that phrase even mean?--Levalley (talk) 04:20, 11 October 2009 (UTC)

Ancient german name: EstenEdit

Is there any source for Esten as the historical (until when?) german name of Padua? The only reference I can find with Google is de.wikipedia, itself without any external source. I am italian, I do not live in Padua but I have never heard of such a name.--Furjo (talk) 14:44, 26 December 2013 (UTC)

Climate data might need updatingEdit

After a recent wave of unusually high temperatures, climate data needs a review (at least) for record highs. 79.54.80.57 (talk) 22:24, 6 August 2017 (UTC)

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