Talk:Coleman fuel

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Fuel?Edit

Coleman fuel is simply Octane; plus possibly some Heptane or others. It is white gas--or, unleaded gasoline. Like what they sold in the 'sixties sans tetraethyl lead. Used to be big stickers warning you of it: "For use as a motor fuel only..."; etc.It is Not Naphtha; that is Lighter Fluid. At least, in the United states. What they call Naphtha or Kerosene varies from country to country. The "paraffin", for example, in British texts means Lamp Oil--Kerosene (Rock or Petroleum oil, sometimes, here), or Whale Oil, etc; not the paraffin wax as it means in the U.S. Unleaded modern gasoline will work in a Coleman stove; but the original Coleman fuel is better. It has no lead or other additives for anti-knock--that is why you shouldn't use it in internal combustion engines; not that it is "naphtha".68.231.189.108 ,talk) 15:45, 4 December 2009 (UTC)

The discussion above about the differences between the various fuels - white gas, unleaded gas, octane, naphtha and Coleman fuel - is sort of right, but also a little off the mark. It can get a little confusing because some of the terms have different usages over time and/or in different contexts.
It's correct that white gas (or "white gasoline") at one time referred to pure automobile gasoline - that is, gasoline without lead or other additives. It's not the same as unleaded gasoline sold today, which has different properties than "white gasoline" (notably a higher octane rating than "white gasoline," as well as a number of other additives). "White gas" as that term is commonly used today generally refers to naphtha or Coleman fuel.
Naphtha is a general term that covers a range of light petroleum distillates. Naphtha has a number of applications in the refining process ("light" naphtha is used as a feedstock for production of olefins, for example, and "heavy" naphtha (a low octane product) is converted into higher octane "reformates" using a catalytic reforming process). The type of naphtha typically available at the retail level is VM&P ("Varnish Makers & Painters") naphtha, which is used as a light solvent and thinner for oil-based paints. And (as noted above) naphtha is used as a lighter fluid for wick-type lighters.
Coleman fuel (CAS No. 68410-97-9) is not "simply octane," but is a blend of light petroleum distillates that includes octane, nonane, cyclohexane, pentane and heptane. Its properties (volatility, vapor density, etc.) are similar to naphtha (VM&P naphtha) and both are suitable for use in liquid fuel campstoves and lanterns. In the UK, naphtha is sold under the trade name "Panel Wipe," and is often used in campstoves due to the high cost of Coleman fuel there. Unleaded gasoline can sometimes be used in stoves and lanterns that are designed for Coleman fuel or naphtha, but not always.
Kerosene is a totally different beast from naphtha - significant differences in vapor pressure, density, boiling point, etc. It is correct that what is called "kerosene" in the US is called "paraffin" in the UK, and is not to be confused with "paraffin wax." Stoves designed for Coleman fuel generally cannot use kerosene, without modification (e.g., different burner jets). John Fogarty (talk) 17:48, 9 October 2010 (UTC)
A casuistic remark. In the 1980's I toured the United States on a motorbike that ran on regular unleaded fuel. I also had a gallon can of Coleman fuel for my stove. On two occasions I have had to use Coleman Fuel to run my bike to get to the nearest gas station. So it is possible but not very sensible (if only because Coleman fuel at that time was much more expensive than unleaded gasoline). JHvW 16:11, 22 February 2014 (UTC) To which I would like to add that the reverse is also true. If you run out of Coleman Fuel you can burn gasoline. I have since bought a 442 (Coleman Feather), which (according to Coleman) runs on both unleaded and Coleman Fuel. As Coleman Fuel is very expensive compared to gasoline or white gas, I usually prefer unleaded. Coleman has also stated that white gas (or their fuel) might actually clog up generators if not used for a long time. It seems sensible to remove whatever fuel you use from the appliance if you are not going to use it for a long time.JHvW 09:13, 24 June 2018 (UTC)

No merger with "naphtha"Edit

Coleman fuel is a specific range of hydrocarbon mixture, a "clean fuel" used around households as an emergency fuel.

Naphtha is a huge range of hydrocarbon mixtures with various impurities. To reduce confusion, avoid substitution of the wrong naphtha mixture, I strongly suggest no merger. When the lights are flickering near stores closing time in a storm, one doesn't want to wade through a refining or pedagogical article. My side of town recently spent 3-5 days without power. A specific fuel article addresses common confusions that helps prevent economic loss and safety problems. Please leave this stand alone article as is.--Incogm (talk) 22:27, 2 October 2012 (UTC)

I pulled all the merger tags. If someone proposes a merger, they need to try to make a case on this page. They didn't even try.JSR (talk) 22:39, 2 October 2012 (UTC)

inaccurate informationEdit

"Its high combustion temperature and lack of octane boosting additives like tetraethyllead will destroy engine valves"

tetraethyllead has not been used in over 40 years (its page says so) yet it is used as an example of something Coleman fuel is lacking that would prevent it from being used in a gasoline engine.

as I am not a seasoned Wikipedia contributor so I would rather point it out than attempt to fix it but not be up to editing standards

80.5.128.19 (talk) 23:43, 20 April 2014 (UTC)

Tetraethyllead is an example of an Antiknock agent; it's just used to refer to any anti-knocking agent here, as it's the best known one. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2001:8B0:9FC:739E:91EB:677A:168A:EFE3 (talk) 20:44, 14 October 2014 (UTC)

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