Talk:Antihypotensive agent

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volume don't belong in this categoryEdit

I deleted the references to volume expansion (e.g. saline) as a vasopressor. Vasopressors have pharmacological activity. — Preceding unsigned comment added by DrKC MD (talkcontribs) 00:19, 7 January 2012 (UTC)

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Why does 'pressor response' redirect here?Edit

To my understanding a pressor response is an increase in blood pressure from a stimulus which is not necessarily medication, which is what this article seems to be about. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.179.182.60 (talk) 06:24, 17 September 2016 (UTC)

Mechanism of Dopamine(antihypotensive drug)Edit

Dopamine is a precursor to norepinephrine in noradrenergic nerves and is also a neurotransmitter in certain areas of the central nervous system. Dopamine produces positive chronotropic and inotropic effects on the myocardium, resulting in increased heart rate and cardiac contractility. This is accomplished directly by exerting an agonist action on beta-adrenoceptors and indirectly by causing release of norepinephrine from storage sites in sympathetic nerve endings. In the brain, dopamine actas as an agonist to the five dopamine receptor subtypes (D1, D2, D3, D4, D5). Suhail Dar (talk) 03:37, 25 October 2017 (UTC)

Action of Dopamine on The BodyEdit

Pharmacodynamics Dopamine is a natural catecholamine formed by the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). It is a precursor to norepinephrine in noradrenergic nerves and is also a neurotransmitter in certain areas of the central nervous system, especially in the nigrostriatal tract, and in a few peripheral sympathetic nerves. Dopamine produces positive chronotropic and inotropic effects on the myocardium, resulting in increased heart rate and cardiac contractility. This is accomplished directly by exerting an agonist action on beta-adrenoceptors and indirectly by causing release of norepinephrine from storage sites in sympathetic nerve endings. Suhail Dar (talk) 03:40, 25 October 2017 (UTC)