Seat of government

The seat of government is (as defined by Brewer's Politics) "the building, complex of buildings or the city from which a government exercises its authority".[1]

In most countries, the nation’s capital is also seat of its government, thus that city is appropriately referred to as the national seat of government. The terms are not however, completely synonymous, as some countries' seat of government differs from the capital. The Netherlands, for example, has Amsterdam as its capital but The Hague is the seat of government; and the Philippines, with Manila as its capital but the whole Metro Manila, also designated as National Capital Region (NCR), is the seat of government.

Local seats of governmentEdit

Local and regional authorities usually have a seat, called an administrative centre, as well. Terms for seats of local government of various levels and in various countries include:

Buildings as seats of governmentEdit

Examples of seats of government include:

List of seats of state government which are not state capitalsEdit

There are several countries where, for various reasons, the official capital and de facto seat of government are separated:

States with no official capitalEdit

Historical examplesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Comfort, N. (1993) Brewer's Politics. A phrase and fable dictionary. London: Cassell.
  2. ^ "The Parliament of Swaziland" Archived 2016-03-04 at the Wayback Machine. Commonwealth Parliamentary Association. Accessed April 7, 2014.
  3. ^ "This Tanzanian city may soon be one of the world's most populous. Is it ready?". Environment. 2019-04-05. Retrieved 2020-02-11.
  4. ^ "The Administrative Capital of Sri Lanka since 1982 is Sri Jayewardenepura Kotte". Official Sri Lanka government website. Archived from the original on 2014-12-20. Retrieved 2015-01-07.
  5. ^ Leonard, T. M. (2005). Encyclopedia of the Developing World. Routledge. pp.1083. ISBN 978-1-57958-388-0
  6. ^ Jonnard, M. Jonnard Claude M.; Jonnard, Claude M. (November 2009). Islands in the Wind: The Political Economy of the English East Caribbean. iUniverse. ISBN 978-1-4401-9426-9.
  7. ^ Constituencies of Nauru (naurugov.nr)
  8. ^ "Yaren | district, Nauru". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2019-09-02.