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San Juan, Batangas

San Juan, officially the Municipality of San Juan, (Tagalog: Bayan ng San Juan), is a 1st class municipality in the province of Batangas, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 108,585 people.[3]

San Juan
Municipality of San Juan
Gen. Luna Street, the town proper's main thoroughfare
Gen. Luna Street, the town proper's main thoroughfare
Flag of San Juan
Flag
Official seal of San Juan
Seal
Motto(s): 
"Sama-sama Tayo sa Napapanahong Pagbabago"
Anthem: Bagong Araw (Himno ng San Juan)
Map of Batangas with San Juan highlighted
Map of Batangas with San Juan highlighted
San Juan is located in Philippines
San Juan
San Juan
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 13°50′N 121°24′E / 13.83°N 121.4°E / 13.83; 121.4Coordinates: 13°50′N 121°24′E / 13.83°N 121.4°E / 13.83; 121.4
Country Philippines
RegionCalabarzon (Region IV-A)
ProvinceBatangas
District4th District
FoundedDecember 12, 1848
Barangays42 (see Barangays)
Government
[1]
 • TypeSangguniang Bayan
 • MayorIldebrando "Beebong" D. Salud
 • Vice MayorOctavio Antonio L. Marasigan
 • CongressmanLianda Bolilia
 • Electorate69,027 voters (2019)
Area
[2]
 • Total273.40 km2 (105.56 sq mi)
Population
 (2015 census)[3]
 • Total108,585
 • Density400/km2 (1,000/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+8 (PST)
ZIP code
4226
PSGC
IDD:area code+63 (0)43
Climate typetropical monsoon climate
Income class1st municipal income class
Revenue (₱)251,529,798.22 (2016)
Native languagesTagalog
Feast dateMay 16
Catholic dioceseArchdiocese of Lipa
Patron saintSt. John Nepomucene
Websitewww.sanjuanbatangas.gov.ph

The town is known for its baroque church and the Pinagbayanan excavation, the most important archaeological site in the municipality.

HistoryEdit

In the years 1698 until 1836, San Juan was just a barrio of the large town of Rosario located in the eastern part of Batangas. From 1837, the government of San Juan was governed by tinientes or Deputies with term of one to two years. However, when San Juan was recognized as a separate town in 1843, the position of tinientes was replaced by Cabezas de Barangay serving one for each new barrio. It was only in 1848 when the Spanish government officially recognized the independence of San Juan from its mother town of Rosario, and was given the name San Juan de Bocboc. [4]

San Juan was headed by a Gobernadorcillo in 1864. The first Goberdanorcillo was Don Camilo Perez, a prominent citizen who initiated the separation of San Juan from Rosario. He is considered as the founder of the town, and was honored for his contribution in public works and peace and order in the newly created town.

On October 28, 1883, San Juan experienced a major disaster due to continuous winds and intense storm rain. Huge flood from the Bancoro and Bangbang Rivers hit the town resulting to the destruction of houses, drowning of livestocks and planted crops, and the devastation of the church and its convent. In 1886, the flooding become worse in the town. The parish priest had to erect a temporary church and convent in a site seven kilometers away from the town. [5]

On January 18, 1886, the officials of the town initiated the transfer of the new town to Calitcalit. The transfer of the Lumang Bayan to its present location was approved by Governor General Valeriano Weyler on December 12, 1890, during the administration of Gobernadorcillo Benedicto De Villa. San Juan de Bocboc was renamed as Bolbok by the virtue of Act No. 2390 dated February 28, 1914. [6] In the early years of 1920, Bolbok was then renamed as San Juan, in honor of San Juan Nepomuceno, the town’s patron saint.[7]

GeographyEdit

 
View of Tayabas Bay and the Lobo Mountain Range

San Juan is located at 13°50′N 121°24′E / 13.83°N 121.4°E / 13.83; 121.4, at the easternmost part of Batangas province. North of San Juan is the neighboring town of Candelaria, with Malaking Ilog River defining its geographical boundary. Tayabas Bay lies east and the hills on the eastern portion separate it from the towns of Lobo and Rosario.

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority, the municipality has a land area of 273.40 square kilometres (105.56 sq mi)[2] constituting 8.76% of the 3,119.75-square-kilometre- (1,204.54 sq mi) total area of Batangas.

BarangaysEdit

 
Political map of San Juan, showing the 42 barangays under its jurisdiction.

San Juan is politically subdivided into 42 barangays.[8]

PSGC Barangay Population ±% p.a.
2015[3] 2010[9]
041023001 Abung 2.0% 2,119 1,947 1.62%
041023002 Balagbag 2.3% 2,539 2,147 3.24%
041023003 Barualte 1.5% 1,676 1,389 3.64%
041023004 Bataan 1.8% 1,911 1,786 1.30%
041023005 Buhay na Sapa 4.7% 5,123 3,751 6.11%
041023006 Bulsa 2.0% 2,160 1,543 6.61%
041023007 Calicanto 1.8% 1,957 1,908 0.48%
041023008 Calitcalit 4.2% 4,556 4,128 1.90%
041023009 Calubcub I 2.0% 2,206 1,794 4.01%
041023010 Calubcub II 3.2% 3,529 3,360 0.94%
041023011 Catmon 1.3% 1,418 1,282 1.94%
041023012 Coloconto 0.7% 758 702 1.47%
041023013 Escribano 3.0% 3,255 2,844 2.60%
041023014 Hugom 1.5% 1,578 1,301 3.74%
041023015 Imelda (Tubog) 0.9% 959 909 1.02%
041023016 Janaojanao 1.4% 1,511 1,466 0.58%
041023017 Laiya‑Ibabao 4.1% 4,504 3,580 4.47%
041023018 Laiya‑Aplaya 5.5% 6,005 5,572 1.44%
041023019 Libato 3.8% 4,107 3,997 0.52%
041023020 Lipahan 4.0% 4,380 3,814 2.67%
041023021 Mabalanoy 3.5% 3,834 3,155 3.78%
041023022 Nagsaulay 2.4% 2,604 2,404 1.53%
041023023 Maraykit 3.3% 3,574 3,060 3.00%
041023024 Muzon 1.4% 1,539 1,497 0.53%
041023025 Palahanan I 0.8% 841 713 3.19%
041023026 Palahanan II 3.0% 3,234 2,954 1.74%
041023027 Palingowak 1.5% 1,632 1,469 2.02%
041023028 Pinagbayanan 1.4% 1,508 1,173 4.90%
041023029 Poblacion 3.0% 3,281 3,111 1.02%
041023030 Poctol 2.3% 2,548 2,216 2.69%
041023031 Pulangbato 2.5% 2,767 2,391 2.82%
041023032 Putingbuhangin 2.3% 2,491 1,872 5.59%
041023033 Quipot 3.1% 3,328 2,517 5.46%
041023034 Sampiro 2.9% 3,151 2,690 3.06%
041023035 Sapangan 2.7% 2,940 2,435 3.65%
041023036 Sico I 1.8% 1,977 1,700 2.92%
041023037 Sico II 1.0% 1,100 934 3.16%
041023038 Subukin 1.5% 1,635 1,444 2.39%
041023039 Talahiban I 2.1% 2,244 2,055 1.69%
041023040 Talahiban II 1.2% 1,301 1,261 0.60%
041023041 Ticalan 1.7% 1,830 1,486 4.04%
041023042 Tipaz 2.7% 2,975 2,534 3.10%
Total 108,585 94,291 2.72%

DemographicsEdit

YearPop.±% p.a.
1903 11,853—    
1918 13,553+0.90%
1939 24,837+2.93%
1948 28,642+1.60%
1960 36,220+1.98%
1970 47,101+2.66%
1975 52,936+2.37%
YearPop.±% p.a.
1980 59,345+2.31%
1990 67,741+1.33%
1995 71,913+1.13%
2000 78,169+1.80%
2007 87,276+1.53%
2010 94,291+2.85%
2015 108,585+2.72%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[3][9][10][11]

In the 2015 census, San Juan had a population of 108,585.[3] The population density was 400 inhabitants per square kilometre (1,000/sq mi).

EconomyEdit

San Juan is a first class municipality in the province of Batangas. It is initially identified as one of the Special Economic Zones ( ECOZONES). According to RA 7916 or the Special Economic Zone Act of 1995, ecozones are selected areas with highly developed or which have the potential to be developed into agro-industrial, industrial, tourist/recreational, commercial, banking, investment and financial centers. [12]

San Juan is a tourist destination known for its white-sand beaches. The tourism and aquaculture industries provide jobs to the town's people and income to the town economy.

Because of its fertile land, the municipality is one of the top suppliers of agricultural products in the province.

The town has also a coconut wine and pottery industry.

IncomeEdit

Here's the list of the total annual income, assets, expenses and equity of San Juan since 2015, according to the Annual Audit Reports of the Commission on Audit:

Year Total Annual Income Assets Expenses Equity
2018 [13] ₱326,581,854.00   ₱714,378,369.54   ₱290,098,959.77   ₱616,441,566.44  
2017 [14] ₱307,359,289.40   ₱631,222,065.04   ₱250,243,204.16   ₱522,162,348.18  
2016 [15] ₱258,671,588.66   ₱634,400,575.24   ₱208,687,514.58   ₱532,424,224.13 
2015 [16] ₱237,642,431.61 ₱310,971,370.24 ₱180,286,101.48 ₱232,961,446.48

GovernmentEdit

Government officialsEdit

 
Municipal hall

The 2019 local elections in San Juan was held on May 13, 2019 resulting to the election of the new municipal mayor and municipal vice mayor. Four municipal councilors, elected on May 9, 2016, were re-elected while the four others will serve their first term. The following are the elected government officials of San Juan. Their term will expire on June 30, 2022.

Municipal Government of San Juan
(2019-2022)
Mayor
Ildebrando Dañas Salud (NPC)
Vice Mayor
Octavio Antonio L. Marasigan (Nacionalista)
Sangguniang Panlungsod Members
Alvin John O. Samonte (NPC) Meynardo V. Robles (NPC)
Rowena M. Magadia (NPC) Grenalyn V. Virtusio Ll.B. (NPC)
Rodello A. De Chavez (NPC) Melchor C. Ayap (NPC)
Angelo Luis T. Marasigan (Nacionalista) Erniño A. Llana (Nacionalista)
ABC President
Wivin R. Llana (Laiya Aplaya)
SK Federation President
Joel S. Rey, Jr. (Calicanto)

List of former Municipal MayorsEdit

Order Name Years in Office Achievement
1 Don Esteban de Villa 1900-1905 Built the town's public market
2 Don Gregorio de Villa 1905-1906 Constructed the town's elementary school (Gabaldon)
3 Don Benedicto de Villa 1906-1907 Pioneered the town's sugar industry that brought prosperity to the town
4 Don Raymundo Balinos 1907-1910 Encouraged the education of the town's people
5 Don Florencio Perez 1910-1913 Built a public cemetery for the poor and the non-Catholics
6 Don Gregorio de Villa 1913-1916
7 Don Esteban de Villa 1916-1919
8 Don Juan R. Quizon 1919-1922 Constructed the municipal building and acquired the site for the town plaza
9 Don Nicolas Virrey 1922-1925
10 Don Juan R. Quizon 1925-1928
11 Don Filemon Malabanan 1928-1934 Built the water reservoir and worked for the electrification of the town
12 Don Miguel Lopez 1934-1942 Instrumental in the building of San Juan East Central School
13 Guillermo de Villa 1942-1945 Maintained peaceful relationship with the Japanese government while working secretly with the guerillas
14 Vicente Castillo 1945; 1946-1955 Built the Lawaye River Dike, and organized the town's police force
15 Jose Garcia 1956-1963 Built the Sampiro-Quipot feeder road
16 Estelito Castillo 1964-1967 Repaired municipal building, implemented the minimum wage law, and managed to acquire fire trucks from the national government
17 Vicente Lecaroz 1968-1986 Built feeder roads and bridges; responsible for the construction of additional school buildings; he also eradicated cattle-rustling
18 Abelardo de Villa 1986-1998 Electrification of barrios; built new feeder roads, new bridges and cemented road to Laiya.
19 Rodolfo H. Manalo 1998-2007 a) Carried out the Computerization of Real Property Tax Administration and Business Permit and Licensing System. b) Build Farm to Market Roads and Bridges.
20 Danilo S. Mindanao 2007-2010 Asphalting of roads; he envisioned the cityhood of San Juan
21 Rodolfo H. Manalo 2010‑2019 Establishment of 13 national high schools, opening of barangay roads and massive concreting of Farm To Market Roads, construction of hanging and foot bridge in various barangays, scholarships to indigent constituents from elementary to college, massive mangrove rehabilitation, tree planting, no to mining, no to plastics, regulated cutting of trees.
22 Ildebrando D. Salud 2019‑Present

Official sealEdit

  • Horse – The municipality is known for its horses and other farm animals like cows, pigs, and goats.
  • Tuba Container – locally known as batang, a container in which tuba is gathered from the coconut tree.
  • Fruits – Fruits such as mangoes, citrus, atis and tamarind which are grown abundantly in the town.
  • Roundels – signifies the number of barangays (42) comprising the municipality

TourismEdit

On June 29, 2010, then President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo signed the Executive Order No. 904, series of 2010 designating the Municipality of San Juan, Batangas as a priority area for Tourism Development.  [17]

 
San Juan Nepomuceno Parish Church
  • San Juan Nepomuceno Church – The church was built during the Spanish colonial period.
  • Laiya Beach – San Juan has a coastline with several beach resorts for swimming, diving and other outdoor activities
  • Mount Daguldol – The highest mountain in San Juan, 670 metres (2,200 ft) high
  • Mangrove Forest at Barangay Poctol – One of the largest mangrove areas in San Juan; located in Sitio Pontor
  • Ancestral houses – Built during Spanish and American colonial periods in the town.
  • Municipal Hall – Erected on 1928 under the administration of Juan R. Quizon, the then Presidente Municipal. It has a simple yet enticing architectural style
  • Malaking Ilog River at Barangay Poctol – This river serves as a boundary between Batangas and Quezon Province.
  • Naambon Falls - A secluded, undisturbed series of falls and small pools. It has several look-out points with views of dense forest and Tayabas Bay.[18]

EducationEdit

Private schools in town include Joseph Marello Institute, founded in 1947, and Batangas Eastern Colleges. San Juan has also a campus of Batangas State University located at Barangay Talahiban II.

Almost all barangays have their own elementary and high schools, where tuition fees are relatively low.

Despite improvements of the town's education system, parents of some students from well-off families send their children to Metro Manila for college.

Notable peopleEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Municipality". Quezon City, Philippines: Department of the Interior and Local Government. Retrieved 31 May 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Province: Batangas". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e Census of Population (2015). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
  4. ^ "A Glimpse of History". sanjuanbatangas.gov.ph.
  5. ^ "The San Juan Batangas Legacy" (PDF). Arch. Leon M. Mayo.
  6. ^ "Act No. 2390, 1914". Lawyerly.ph.
  7. ^ "A Glimpse of History". sanjuanbatangas.gov.ph.
  8. ^ "Municipal: San Juan, Batangas". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 8 January 2016.
  9. ^ a b Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  10. ^ Censuses of Population (1903–2007). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Table 1. Population Enumerated in Various Censuses by Province/Highly Urbanized City: 1903 to 2007. NSO.
  11. ^ "Province of Batangas". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved 17 December 2016.
  12. ^ "Republic Act No. 7916". Official Gazette of the Philippines.
  13. ^ "2018 COA Annual Audit Report for San Juan, Batangas". Commission on Audit.
  14. ^ "2017 COA Annual Financial Report for Local Government Unit". Commission on Audit.
  15. ^ "2016 COA Annual Financial Report for Local Government Unit". Commission on Audit.
  16. ^ "2015 COA Annual Financial Report for Local Government Unit". Commission on Audit.
  17. ^ "Executive Order No. 904 s. 2010". Official Gazette of the Philippines.
  18. ^ "San Juan Batangas". sanjuanbatangas.gov.ph. Retrieved 11 December 2016.

External linksEdit

  Media related to San Juan, Batangas at Wikimedia Commons