Russia men's national water polo team

The Russia men's national water polo team is the representative for Russia in international men's water polo. The team is a successor of the Soviet water polo team.

Russia
Flag of Russia.svg
FINA codeRUS
AssociationRussian Water Polo Federation
ConfederationLEN (Europe)
Head coachSergey Yevstigneyev
Asst coachMarat Zakirov
CaptainSergey Lisunov
FINA ranking (since 2008)
Current14 (as of 9 August 2021)
Olympic Games (team statistics)
Appearances3 (first in 1996)
Best result2nd place, silver medalist(s) (2000)
World Championship
Appearances8 (first in 1994)
Best result3rd place, bronze medalist(s) (1994, 2001)
World Cup
Appearances6 (first in 1993)
Best result1st place, gold medalist(s) (2002)
World League
Appearances16 (first in 2002)
Best result1st place, gold medalist(s) (2002)
European Championship
Appearances13 (first in 1993)
Best result3rd place, bronze medalist(s) (1997)
Media
Websitewaterpolo.ru
Russia men's national water polo team
Medal record
Representing  Russia
Summer Universiade
Silver medal – second place 2001 Beijing Team
Silver medal – second place 2011 Shenzhen Team
Silver medal – second place 2013 Kazan Team
Silver medal – second place 2017 Taipei Team
Logo of the Water Polo Association of Russia

HistoryEdit

In the Russian EmpireEdit

Water polo in Russia dates back to 1910, when the sport was included into the national water sports programme. The Shuvalov school was opened back then, featuring rules that differed from the international rules. In 1913, the first water polo tournament was played between the Shuvalov school and Moscow, with the first winning 3–2. The new sport progressed in Russia, as all swimming organizations included this sport into their programme. P. Erofeev and A. Shemansky further populized water polo by publishing brochures with rules and hints.[1]

In the Soviet UnionEdit

As previously, water polo was predominant in Moscow and Leningrad (formerly known as St. Petersburg). However, this changed when the water polo teams of the Black Sea Fleet, Baltic Fleet and Caspian Flotilla further spread water polo in Russia. In the early history, water polo was popular especially among sailors. The strongest teams were Delfin of Leningrad and the Moscow Life Saving Society and the Yacht-Club. Following the resolution by the organizing bureau of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1925, physical culture has been greatly propagated in Russia, stimulating water polo as well.[2]

The first championship took place in 1925. Apart from the teams of Leningrad, Moscow and Kiev, the tournament featured teams from the Caucasus, Crimea, Ural, as well as the aforementioned fleet teams. Three years later, water polo was included in the All-Union Spartakiade (sports festival). The team of Leningrad dominated in Russian water polo until 1933, as the city had winter water pools and so had more training opportunities. In 1946, the USSR Water Polo Cup was introduced. One year later, the Soviet Union was selected into the FINA. The national water polo then debuted at the 1952 Winter Olympics in Helsinki.[2]

ResultsEdit

Olympic GamesEdit

World ChampionshipEdit

World CupEdit

World LeagueEdit

  • 2002  Gold medal[3]
  • 2005 – 6th place
  • 2006 – 14th place
  • 2007 – 13th place
  • 2008 – 13th place
  • 2009 – 15th place
  • 2010 – 13th place
  • 2011 – 14th place
  • 2012 – Preliminary round
  • 2013 – 5th place
  • 2014 – Preliminary round
  • 2015 – Preliminary round
  • 2016 – Preliminary round
  • 2017 – 5th place
  • 2018 – Preliminary round
  • 2019 – Preliminary round

European ChampionshipEdit

Current squadEdit

Roster for the 2020 Men's European Water Polo Championship.[5]

Head coach: Sergey Yevstigneyev

No Name Pos. L/R Date of birth Height Weight Caps Club
1 Petr Fedotov GK R (1992-07-02) 2 July 1992 (age 30) 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 84 kg (185 lb) 40   Spartak Volgograd
2 Ivan Suchkov DF R (1995-06-15) 15 June 1995 (age 27) 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 97 kg (214 lb) 56   Dynamo Moscow
3 Ivan Vasilev W R (2000-03-25) 25 March 2000 (age 22) 1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) 80 kg (180 lb) 23   Baltika Saint-Petersburg
4 Nikita Dereviankin CF L (1994-06-21) 21 June 1994 (age 28) 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in) 109 kg (240 lb) 60   Sintez Kazan
5 Artem Ashaev FP R (1988-12-05) 5 December 1988 (age 33) 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 96 kg (212 lb) 45   Spartak Volgograd
6 Konstantin Kharkov W L (1997-02-23) 23 February 1997 (age 25) 1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) 93 kg (205 lb) 36   HAVK Mladost
7 Daniil Merkulov FP R (1997-03-03) 3 March 1997 (age 25) 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 105 kg (231 lb) 73   VK Jug
8 Ivan Nagaev W L (1993-11-30) 30 November 1993 (age 28) 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) 74   Waspo Hannover
9 Igor Bychkov CF R (1994-01-21) 21 January 1994 (age 28) 2.02 m (6 ft 8 in) 110 kg (240 lb) 45   Dynamo Moscow
10 Konstantin Kiselev DF R (1995-05-16) 16 May 1995 (age 27) 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 104 kg (229 lb) 10   Spartak Volgograd
11 Sergey Lisunov (C) CF R (1986-10-12) 12 October 1986 (age 35) 1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) 110 kg (240 lb) 253   Dynamo Moscow
12 Roman Shepelev FP R (1993-08-03) 3 August 1993 (age 28) 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 71   Dynamo Moscow
13 Vitaly Statsenko GK R (1997-07-21) 21 July 1997 (age 24) 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 95 kg (209 lb) 38   TSOP Moscow

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ РАЗВИТИЕ ВОДНОГО ПОЛО В РОССИЙСКОЙ ИМПЕРИИ
  2. ^ a b РАЗВИТИЕ ВОДНОГО ПОЛО В СССР
  3. ^ a b c d "HistoFINA – Water polo medalists and statistics" (PDF). fina.org. FINA. September 2019. pp. 4, 14, 25, 40, 48. Archived (PDF) from the original on 1 August 2021. Retrieved 6 August 2021.
  4. ^ "Press release – FINA Bureau meets, makes further decisions on Russian and Belarusian athletes and event hosting". fina.org. Retrieved 23 March 2022.
  5. ^ "2020 European Championships roster" (PDF). wp2020budapest.microplustiming.com. p. 13. Retrieved 14 January 2020.