Roman Catholic Diocese of Civita Castellana

The Diocese of Civita Castellana (Latin: Dioecesis Civitatis Castellanae) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in Latium, central Italy. It has existed in the current form since 1986, when the Diocese of Nepi e Sutri was united into the Diocese of Civita Castellana, Orte e Gallese. The diocese of Gallese had been added to the dioceses of Civita Castellana and Orte in 1805. The name of the diocese was shortened in 1991, in accordance with recently developed Vatican policies. The diocese of Civita Castellana is immediately subject to the Holy See (the Papacy).[1][2]

Diocese of Civita Castellana

Dioecesis Civitatis Castellanae
Duomo cattedrale di Civita Castellana.jpg
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provinceImmediately subject to the Holy See
Statistics
Area1,552 km2 (599 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2016)
266,014
252,000 (guess)
Parishes76
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
RiteRoman Rite
CathedralBasilica Cattedrale di S. Maria Maggiore (Civita Castellana)
Co-cathedralBasilica Concattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Orte)
Concattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Gallese)
Concattedrale di S. Maria Assunta e S. Anastasi (Nepi)
Concattedrale di S. Maria Assunta in Cielo (Sutri)
Secular priests91 (diocesan)
44 (religious Orders)
17 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopRomano Rossi
Bishops emeritusDivo Zadi
Website
www.diocesicivitacastellana.it

HistoryEdit

The earliest known bishop with his seat at Civita Castellana is Crescentius (or Crescentianus). In 998, he discovered and transported to Cività Castellana the remains of Martianus and Johannes and other deceased people. The story of these marvellous deeds was published at Rome in 1584.[3]

The Antipope Clement III (Archbishop Wibert of Ravenna) died in Civita Castellana on 8 September 1100.[4]

In 1252 the diocese of Gallese was incorporated with that of Civita Castellana. Reestablished in 1562, Gallese was again suppressed in 1573.[5] During that brief period, it had two bishops, Girolamo Garimberti of Parma (1563–1565), and Gabriel degli Alessandri of Bergamo (1566–1569).[6] The diocese of Gallese was restored on 20 December 1805, by Pope Pius VII, in the bull "Romanorum Pontificum", and the old cathedral, which had been reduced to the status of the collegiate church of S. Maria Assunta, again became a cathedral, served by twelve Canons, and headed by two dignities, the Archpriest and the Archdeacon. The diocese, however, was united to the diocese of Cività Castellana e Orte, all three dioceses having one and the same bishop, aeque personaliter.[7]

On 5 October 1437, in the bull "Sacrosancta Romana", Pope Eugenius IV united the diocese of Orte[8] with the diocese of Cività Castellana in the person of a single bishop.[9] Orte (Orta, the ancient Horta) is some fifty miles north of Rome.[10] In accordance with Pope Eugenius' decree, the bishop was required to hold his Chrism Mass (usually on Holy Thursday) and his ordinations of priests in alternate years in Orte and in Civita Castellana.

In 1748, the Chapter of the cathedral of the Annunciation in Civita Castellana was composed of one dignity and fourteen Canons. The Chapter of the cathedral of the Assumption in Orte was composed of one dignity and eighteen Canons.[11]In the mid-19th century, the cathedral of Civita Castellana was administered and serviced by a Chapter consisting of one dignity, the Archpriest, and eighteen Canons.[12]

Bishop Giovanni Tenderini (1718–1739) took the major steps to found a seminary, but it was not until 1746 that it opened. The diocesan seminary, like many ecclesioastical institutions, suffered under French invasion and occupation. After the French removal, the seminary was located in the former Franciscan convent next to S. Pietro in Civita Castellana. The convent had been emptied by the French occupation forces under Napoleon, and when they were driven out, permission to convert it to diocesan use was given by Pope Pius VII, and it opened in 1825.[13]

BishopsEdit

Diocese of Civita CastellanaEdit

...
  • Crescentianus (attested 996–1136)[14]
  • Benedictus (attested 1037–1050)[15]
  • Petrus (attested 1059–1065)[16]
  • Rogerius[17]
...
  • Joannes (c.1101)[18]
...
  • Petrus (attested 1126)[19]
...
  • Petrus (attested 1179–1183)[20]
...
  • Romanus (attested 1206–1212)[21]
  • Guilelmus (attested 1217)[22]
  • Petrus (attested 1219, 1230)[23]
  • Nicolaus (attested 1232–1233)[24]
...
  • Joannes Magnesi, O.P. (c.1270)[25]
  • Monaldus, O.Min. (1288–1307)[26]
  • Godefredus, O.Min. (1307–1324)[27]
  • Guilelmus, O.Carm. (1324–1331)[28]
  • Franciscus Osni, O.E.S.A. (1331–1348)[29]
  • Joannes (1348–1359)[30]
  • Stephanus, O.E.S.A. (1359–1367?)[31]
  • Joannes, O.P. (attested 1367–1377)[32]
  • Matthaeus (1382–1394?) Roman Obedience[33]
  • Geminus da Viterbo, O.Min. 1388–1390?) Avignon Obedience[34]
  • Antonius da Castronovo, O.P (1390– ? ) Avignon ObedienceAntonio: [35]
  • Angelo (1394– ? ) Roman Obedience[36]
  • Joannes de Arcionibus (1395–1406) Roman Obedience[37]
  • Stephanus, O.Min. 1406–1414) Roman Obedience[38]
  • Joannes Georgii (1414–1432)[39]
[Sante (Sancho)][40]
  • Joannes (attested 1435–1437 deposed)[41]

Bishops of Civita Castellana e OrteEdit

United: 5 October 1437 with the Diocese of Orte

Bishops of Civita Castellana, Orte e GalleseEdit

United: 20 December 1805 with the Diocese of Gallese

  • Fortunato Maria Ercolani, C.P. (19 Apr 1822 –1847)[70]
  • Amadio Zangari (1848–1851)[71]
  • Mattei Augusto Mengacci (1851–1872)[72]
  • Domenico Mignanti (1872–1889)[73]
  • Giovanni Battista Carnevalini (24 May 1889 – 9 Jun 1895)[74]
  • Giacomo Ghezzi, O.F.M.Obs. (1895–1920)[75]
  • Goffredo Zaccherini (8 Mar 1920 –1928)[76]
  • Santino Margaria (9 Oct 1930 – 20 Dec 1947)
  • Roberto Massimiliani (21 Jun 1948 – 19 Jun 1975)
  • Marcello Rosina (10 Apr 1976 – 11 Feb 1986, Bishop of Civita Castellana (, Orte, Gallese, Nepi e Sutri))

Diocese of Civita Castellana (Orte, Gallese, Nepi e Sutri)Edit

United: 11 February 1986 with the Diocese of Nepi e Sutri
Latin Name: Civitatis Castellanae (Hortanus, Gallesinus, Nepesinus, et Sutrinus)
Metropolitan: Diocese of Rome

  • Divo Zadi (10 Mar 1989 – 10 Dec 2007 Retired)

Diocese of Civita CastellanaEdit

Name Changed: 16 February 1991

  • Romano Rossi (10 Dec 2007 – )[77]

Co-cathedralsEdit

Co-cathedral in Nepi (left) Co-cathedral in Sutri (right)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Diocese of Civita Castellana" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016[self-published source]
  2. ^ "Diocese of Civita Castellana" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ Schwartz, p. 257.
  4. ^ Otto Köhncke (1888). Wibert von Ravenna (Papst Clemens III.): ein Beitrag zur Papstgeschichte (in German). Leipzig: Veit. p. 98.
  5. ^ Cappellettyi VI, p. 63.
  6. ^ Alessandri was appointed Vicar General of the diocese of Bressanone, where he died in September 1595, still retaining the title of Bishop of Gallese. Cappelletti VI, pp. 55-57. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica III, p. 200.
  7. ^ Cappelletti VI, p. 67.
  8. ^ Kehr II, p. 192.
  9. ^ The bull is quoted in full by Cappelletti VI, pp. 50-52.
  10. ^ Gaetano Moroni (1848). Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica da s. Pietro sino ai nostri giorni (in Italian). Vol. XLIX. Venezia: Tipografia Emiliana. pp. 182–192.
  11. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 167, note 1. Each city had about 4,000 inhabitants.
  12. ^ Cappelletti VI, p. 68.
  13. ^ Cappelletti VI, pp. 68-69.
  14. ^ Crescentianus (Crescentius) was present at the Roman synods of Pope Benedict VIII on 3 January 1015, and Pope Benedict IX on 2 November 1036. He subscribed as Episcopus Fallarensis. Schwartz, p. 257.
  15. ^ Benedictus: Ughelli I, p. 597, reports that Bishop Benedict subscribed a document as Benedictus Fallaritanae et Castellanae episcopus, and another, according to Schwartz, p. 27, as Benedictus Fallarensis.
  16. ^ Bishop Petrus attested the Roman synods of 13 April 1059, and 6 May 1065. He subscribed as Petrus Castellanus (or Petrus Castellanensis). J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XIX (Venice: A. Zatta 1774), pp. 911-912. Schwartz, p. 257.
  17. ^ Bishop Rogerius attended a consecration at Montecassino on 1 October 1071. Schwartz, p. 257.
  18. ^ Bishop Joannes was present at a memorial service, perhaps on 8 September 1101, the first anniversary of the death of Wibert of Ravenna, the Antipope Clement III, who died in Cività Castellana. Schwartz, p. 257.
  19. ^ Bishop Petrus is mentioned in a privilege of Pope Honorius II for the archbishop of Pisa. Schwartz, p. 257.
  20. ^ Bishop Petrus was present at the Third Lateran Council of Pope Alexander III in March 1179. He subscribed as Petrus civitatis Castellanensis: J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXII (Venice: A. Zatta 1778), p. 459. Ughelli I, p. 597-598.
  21. ^ Romanus: Ughelli I, p. 598.
  22. ^ Bishop Guilelmus was consecrated a bishop by Pope Honorius III during his second year in office. Cappelletti VI, p. 20. Eubel I, p. 190 with note 1.
  23. ^ Eubel I, p. 190 with note 2.
  24. ^ Nicolaus was transferred to the diocese of Viterbo by Pope Gregory IX on 6 October 1233. Ughelli I, p. 598. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 190.
  25. ^ Cappelletti VI, p. 20.
  26. ^ On the death of Bishop Joannes, there was a contested election for his successor. Both candidates, the Archpriest Jacopo of Civita Castellana and the Archpriest Angelo of Viterbo, were rejected by Pope Nicholas IV, who appointed the Franciscan Monaldus to the office. Ughelli I, p. 598. Cappelletti VI, p. 21. Eubel I, p. 190 with note 3.
  27. ^ The election of Fra Godefredus by the Archpriest, Canons and clergy of Civita Castellana, was approved, after inspection by a committee of three cardinals, by Pope Clement V on 5 June 1307. He died in 1324 (or more likely 1323). G. Mollat, ed. (1885). Regestvm Clementis papae V (in Latin). Tomus II. Rome: ex Typographia Vaticana. pp. 36, no. 1677. Eubel I, p. 190.
  28. ^ After the death of Bishop Joannes of Limasol (Cyprus), Guilelmus was elected the new bishop by the Chapter of the cathedral, and was confirmed and consecrated a bishop by the Archbishop of Nicosia, who was apparently unaware of Pope John XXII's decree reserving the appointment to all of the vacant benefices of all of the dioceses to the pope. In the meantime, the Chapter of Civita Castellana in complete discord; part requested the Pope to appoint Gregory of Rome to their bishopric, part requested Gottefridus of Civitella of the diocese of Orvieto. John XXII rejected both requests, and transferred Giulelmus from Limasol to Civitas Castellana, and reminded all concerned of his reservation of benefices, including bishoprics. Guilelmus was appointed by Pope John XXII on 21 February 1324. He was transferred to the diocese of Isernia (Campania) on 13 November 1331. Ughelli I, p. 598. G. Mollat, Jean XXII: Lettres communs Tome cinquième (Paris: Fontemoing 1909), pp. 80-81, no. 19037. Eubel I, pp. 190; 237; 367 with note 5.
  29. ^ Osni was a native of Gubbio, and a professed member of the Order of Hermits of Saint Augustine. He was appointed Bishop of Civita Castellana by Pope John XXII on 4 December 1331. He died in 1348. Ughelli I, p. 598-599. Eubel I, p. 190.
  30. ^ Joannes had previously been Archpriest of the cathedral Chapter of Viterbo. He was appointed Bishop of Civita Castellana by Pope Clement VI on 15 December 1348. He died in 1359. Ughelli, p. 599. Eubel I, p. 190.
  31. ^ A native of Viterbo, Stephanus was appointed by Pope Innocent VI on 12 July 1359. Eubel I, p. 190.
  32. ^ Joannes was appointed Bishop of Civita Castellana on 20 April 1367 by Pope Urban V. Eubel I, p. 190.
  33. ^ Matteo (or Marsilio) was provided by Urban VI during the Western Schism. Eubel I, p. 190.
  34. ^ Gemino: Eubel I, p. 190.
  35. ^ Eubel I, p. 190.
  36. ^ Angelo was provided by Boniface IX during the Western Schism: Gams, p. 685. Eubel I, p. 190.
  37. ^ Giovanni was provided on 30 April 1395 by Boniface IX. He died in 1406. Ughelli I, p. 599. Eubel I, p. 190.
  38. ^ Stephanus was appointed on 8 August 1406 by Pope Innocent VI. He died on 17 April 1414. Eubel I, p. 190.
  39. ^ Joannes was appointed by John XXIII on 19 September 1414. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 190; II, p. 130 with note 1.
  40. ^ Sancho was not a bishop of Civita Castellana. He was transferred to the diocese of Ciudad Rodrigo (Civitatenses) in Spain from the diocese of Orte in 1431. Eubel II, pp. 129; 130 note 1; 166 with note 2.
  41. ^ Joannes: Eubel II, p. 130 with note 3.
  42. ^ Valentinus held the degree of Doctor of Canon Law, and was a Canon of the cathedral of Narnia. He was bishop of Orte, in succession to Bishop Sante (Sancho); he was appointed on 19 March 1432. In 1437, Narnia was offered the bishopric of Corneto e Montefiascone, which he refused. On 5 October 1437 he accepted the addition of the diocese of Civita Castellana to his obligations. On 28 January 1442, Bishop Narnia was transferred to the diocese of Ascoli Piceno by Pope Eugenius IV. Eubel II, pp. 96, 166 with note 3.
  43. ^ Lucas de S. Vittoria was a Canon of the cathedral of Bologna. He was appointed Bishop of Civita Castellana on 28 January 1442 (not 1443, as in Eubel II, p. 166, a misprint; cf. Eubel II, p. 96). During his brief episcopate, the monastery of S. Giorgio was annexed to the diocese. He died before mid-December 1443. Cappelletti VI, pp. 52-53.
  44. ^ Antonius Pauli Stella (He is Antonius Stella on his tombstone) had been a Canon of the cathedral of Civita Castellana. He was appointed bishop by Pope Eugenius IV on 16 December 1443. He died in 1455. Ughelli I, pp. 600-601. Eubel II, p. 166.
  45. ^ Palmieri was a Sicilian, and a master of theology. He was named Bishop of Catanzaro on 21 December 1440, which he resigned in 1448. He was appointed Bishop of Civita Castellana on 20 June 1455 by Pope Calixtus III (Borgia). He died in 1467. Ughelli I, p. 601. Cappelletti VI, p. 53. Eubel II, pp. 121, 166. Abbondio Zuppante (1996). Niccolò Palmieri: umanista e vescovo di Orte dal 1455 al 1467 : Orte, 11 ottobre 1992. Atti delle giornate di studio per la storia della Tuscia (in Italian). Orte: Ente Ottava Medievale.
  46. ^ Antonius was a Canon of the cathedral of Castro (Acquapendente). He was provided as Bishop of Castro (Acquapendente) on 16 February 1463 by Pope Pius II; his bulls were furnished on 31 March 1463. He was transferred to the diocese of Orte e Civita Castellana on 30 October 1467 by Pope Paul II. He died on 18 October 1473. Eubel II, pp. 121 with note 2; 166.
  47. ^ On 4 August 1486 Ajosa was appointed Bishop of Sessa Aurunca by Pope Innocent VIII. "Bishop Pietro Ajosa" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016.[self-published source]
  48. ^ Pechinoli was a Canon of Civita Castellana, and a Doctor in utroque iure. He was also a personal friend of Pope Innocent VIII and an apostolic secretary. He was appointed Bishop of Orte and Civita Castellana on 4 August 1486, and then appointed papal Nuncio to Hungary. On his return he was named governor of Civitavecchia, where he died in October 1492. Ughelli I, p. 601. Cappelletti VI, p. 54. Eubel II, p. 166.
  49. ^ On 24 September 1498, Bruno was appointed Archbishop of Taranto by Pope Alexander VI.
  50. ^ On 16 August 1501, Maccafano was appointed Bishop of Sarno by Pope Alexander VI.
  51. ^ Ludovico: Eubel III, p. 211, note 3.
  52. ^ Burchard was a native of Strasbourg. He was Dean of the cathedral Chapter of Basel. In Rome, he was a cleric of the papal chapel, and an Abbreviator litterarum de parco minore (21 April 1506). He served for more than two decades as papal Master of Ceremonies, and left an important Diarium of his activities in that office. As a reward for his services, Pope Pius III intended to name him a bishop, but died before the documents could be signed and registered. Pope Julius II appointed him Bishop of Orte and Civita Castellana on 29 November 1503. Burchard died on 16 May 1506. Burchard, Joannes (1885). Louis Thuasne (ed.). Diarum, sive rerum urbanarum commentarii (in Latin). Tome troisième (1500-1506). Paris: E. Leroux. pp. i–xlvii. [Thuasne's biography of Burchard at pp. i-xlvii] Eubel III, p. 211 with note 4.
  53. ^ Franceschini was appointed bishop by Julius II on 17 May 1506, the day after the death of Joannes Burchard. Eubel III, p. 211 with note 5.
  54. ^ A native of Rome, Paolo Cesi was named a cardinal deacon by Pope Leo X on 1 July 1517. Cesi was appointed Administrator of the diocese of Orte e Civita Castellana on 7 April 1525. There is no evidence that he was ever consecrated a bishop. He died on 5 August 1537. Eubel III, pp. 17, no. 32; 211 with note 6.
  55. ^ A native of Rome from the Regione Monti, Pomponio Ceci de Lellis (wrongly spelled Cesi) was named Bishop of Orte e Civita Castellana on 12 August 1538. On 20 July 1539, he had still not received his bulls of institution and consecration, though he had been authorized to take possession of the diocese. On 24 November 1539, Cecci was appointed Bishop of Nepi e Sutri by Pope Paul III. In 1538 he was named papal Vicar of the city of Rome. He was named a cardinal on 2 June 1542, but died on 4 August 1542. Lorenzo Cardella (1793), Memorie storiche de' cardinali della Santa Romana Chiesa Tomo IV (Rome: Pagliarini), pp. 238-239. (in Italian) Gaetano Moroni (1860). Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica (in Italian). Venezia: Tipografia Emiliana. p. 93. Rivista arcaldica (in Italian). Roma: Presso il Collegio araldico. 1908. pp. 898–899. Eubel III, pp. 28, no. 43; 211 with note 7.
  56. ^ Bongalli was a native of Rome. He had been bishop-elect of Nepi. He was appointed to Orte e Civita Castellana on 24 November 1539, but on 17 August 1540 he had to be given a document authorizing him to take possession of the diocese. On 5 July 1548, he was ordered to have himself consecrated a bishop. On 27 June 1553, he was appointed Vice-Legate of Benevento. In 1559, he gave evidence at the inquisition of Cardinal Giovanni Morone. He was at the Council of Trent on 29 November 1561. He died in Orte on 3 August 1564. Eubel III, p. 211 with note 8.
  57. ^ Perusco was a native of Rome, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. He was a Referendary of the Tribune of the Two Signatures. He was named Bishop of Orte e Civita Castellana on 7 February 1565 by Pope Pius IV. He died in Civita Castellana on 8 February 1582, at the age of 61. Ughelli I, p. 602. Eubel III, p. 211 with note 10.
  58. ^ Longo was a native of Parma, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. He was appointed Bishop of Orte e Civita Castellana by Pope Gregory XIII on 2 April 1582, though he required a dispensation because he had been in Holy Orders for less than six months. He governed the Church of Civita Castellana for twenty five years. He died on 18 August 1607, at the age of sixty-eight. Ughelli I, p. 602. Cappelletti VI, p. 58. Eubel III, p. 211 with note 11.
  59. ^ Fabiani: Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 151 with note 2.
  60. ^ Gozzadini: Gauchat IV, p. 151 with note 3.
  61. ^ Altini: Gauchat IV, p. 151 with note 4.
  62. ^ Leoncilli: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 159 with note 3.
  63. ^ Aleotti died on 30 September 1704. Ritzler-Sefrin V, p. 159 with note 4.
  64. ^ Blasi: Ritzler-Sefrin V, p. 159 with note 5.
  65. ^ Vincenzo Osio (1817). Ristretto della vita del venerabile servo di Dio monsignor Giovan Francesco Tenderini vescovo di Civita Castellana, ed Orte (in Italian). Roma: presso Francesco Bourlie. Michele Tavani (1870). Vita del venerabile servo di Dio mons. Gio. Francesco Tenderini vescovo di Civita Castellana ed Orte (in Italian). Roma: Tipi della Civilta Cattolica. Ritzler-Sefrin V, p. 159 with note 6.
  66. ^ Vari: Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 167 with note 2.
  67. ^ Lanucci: Ritzler-Sefrin VI, p. 167 with note 3.
  68. ^ Cappelletti VI, p. 61. Ritzler-Sefrin VI, p. 167 with note 4.
  69. ^ De Dominicis: Ritzler-Sefrin VI, p. 167 with note 5.
  70. ^ Ercolani had been titular bishop of Nicopolis in Bulgaria. He died on 27 December 1847. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VII, pp. 152, 283.
  71. ^ A native of Rimini, Zangari was appointed Bishop of Civitas Castellana on 14 April 1848, by Pope Pius IX. On 5 September 1851, Zangari was appointed Bishop of Macerata e Tolentino by Pope Pius IX. He died on 31 May 1864. Ritzler Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VIII, pp. 206, 357.
  72. ^ Mengacci was born in S. Angelo in Vado in 1851. He was appointed Bishop of Civitas Castellana on 5 September 1851. He died on 20 November 1872. Ritzler Sefrin VIII, p. 206.
  73. ^ Mignanti was born at Tolfa (diocese of Tarquinia) in 1824. He was appointed Bishop of Civitas Castellana on 23 December 1872. He died on 27 April 1889. Ritzler Sefrin VIII, p. 206.
  74. ^ Carnevalini was a native of Rome. He was a doctor of philosophy and had a licenciate in theology. He was a Canon of Santa Maria in Via Lata in Rome. He was appointed bishop by Pope Leo XIII on 24 May 1889. He died on 9 June 1895, of apoplexy. Calendario ecclesiastico (in Italian). Roma: Tip. Centenari. 1890. p. 392.
  75. ^ Ghezzi was born at Castel Madama (Tivoli) in 1842, and baptized with the name Alessandro. He was named Bishop of Civitas Castellana on 29 November 1895 by Pope Leo XIII. He died on 26 January 1920. Ritzler Sefrin VIII, p. 206.
  76. ^ On 15 June 1928 Zaccherini was appointed Bishop of Jesi by Pope Benedict XV. He died on 7 December 1938. Pięta, Hierarchia catholica IX, p. 129.
  77. ^ CV of Bishop Rossi: Diocesi di Civita Castellana, "Vescovo: Mons. Romano Rossi"; retrieved: 7 May 2020. (in Italian)

BooksEdit

StudiesEdit

Coordinates: 42°17′N 12°24′E / 42.283°N 12.400°E / 42.283; 12.400